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View Poll Results: Should the US build or improve it's HSR network?
Yes 249 89.57%
No 29 10.43%
Voters: 278. You may not vote on this poll

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Old August 21st, 2013, 02:13 PM   #4281
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I think you'll be massively disappointed. The ACS-64 will only do marginally better then the HHP8. Their tractive effort ratings are comparable and the difference in power rating is only 400 kW and will only show at speeds over about 50 mph. Compared to an AEM7 it will be faster. The only advantage the ACS-64 will have over it's predecessors is it's more advanced control systems, but again the HHP8 isn't exactly old fashioned there either.
I wouldn't say "massively disappointed." I realize the specs for the ACS-64, so it's not like I'm expecting it to rocket out of the station faster than that Acela did or anything. It'll just be nice to see and hear new power on the NEC.
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Old September 7th, 2013, 05:29 AM   #4282
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This guy did a pretty decent job on this.
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Old September 7th, 2013, 01:38 PM   #4283
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I'm actually pretty surprised that that is a high school production.
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Old October 4th, 2013, 02:56 AM   #4284
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Bullet train bound for Fort Worth, officials learn details




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Zipping from Fort Worth to Dallas in 12 minutes – without speeding tickets – could become reality if high-speed rail plans reach fruition.

Speaking at the Tarrant Regional Transportation Coalition’s Oct. 2 monthly meeting, rail proponent Robert Eckels outlined plans not only to link North Texas’ most populated cities, but also establish passage from Dallas to Houston. “The run [from Fort Worth] to Dallas nonstop is 12 minutes,” said Eckels, a former Harris County judge now serving as president of Texas Central High-Speed Railway, a private company joining forces with Central Japan Railway Co. to bring a 205 mph bullet train between Houston to Dallas.

After evaluating 97 U.S. “pair cities” – geographic corridors with two major municipalities – the Japanese firm chose North Texas and its proximity to Houston. “They ultimately decided that a Houston-DFW connection was the most innately financeable project in the U.S.,” Eckels said. Plans call for rail stations in Fort Worth, Arlington and Dallas, from which passengers could travel to Houston. Specific station locations have not been decided. More cities statewide could be added to the rail line after the initial route is established, Eckels said.

Environmental impact studies are expected to begin in early 2014, with construction tentatively slated to begin in 2016 and trains possibly reaching operation by 2020 or 2021. “That’s an aggressive schedule, but not an undoable schedule,” Eckels said.
read more at http://fwbusinesspress.com/fwbp/arti...n-details.aspx
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Old October 4th, 2013, 03:29 AM   #4285
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I do not understand these looooooong environmental impact studies and lengthy costly "evaluations." 2021? Just throw up a long ass bridge, slap rails on it and run the train. I know it's not that easy but I cannot help being frustrated seeing how China can open 155mph-217mph lines every few months while in the U.S. we still have nothing. I seriously would want a Chinese firm to come in and build rail in Texas. They seem to know what they're doing.

Anyway, I hope this gets built sooner than later. This post is probably an exact repeat of my last few posts.
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Old October 4th, 2013, 06:24 AM   #4286
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I kinda like the fact that it's a Japanese company helping out in Texas though they know their stuff. I also second i'm frustrated at the extra long environmental impact study but I guess it can't be helped any way. I hope I'm not the only one who wants it to be called the Texas Shinkasen though.
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Old October 4th, 2013, 10:46 AM   #4287
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The plans have to pass environmental review, no matter the national origin of the builders (i.e. it's the U.S. system that makes things slow). Even if the Chinese were to build this, they will still use American workers and have to follow U.S. and state laws- I have a feeling their cost advantage which comes in play in places like Africa (along with a good helping of good 'ol bribery and corruption) would evaporate.
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Old October 4th, 2013, 11:20 AM   #4288
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweet-d View Post
I kinda like the fact that it's a Japanese company helping out in Texas though they know their stuff. I also second i'm frustrated at the extra long environmental impact study but I guess it can't be helped any way. I hope I'm not the only one who wants it to be called the Texas Shinkasen though.
The name would be great, but in order to make it seem appealing to Americans and more precisely, Texans, I'm sure they're going to use some ludicrous think tank approved name.

My bet is on: Super Freedom Speed Eagle Transport Liberator. (Or at least something along those lines)
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Old October 4th, 2013, 11:25 PM   #4289
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Originally Posted by Sopomon View Post
The name would be great, but in order to make it seem appealing to Americans and more precisely, Texans, I'm sure they're going to use some ludicrous think tank approved name.

My bet is on: Super Freedom Speed Eagle Transport Liberator. (Or at least something along those lines)
more likely a silly portmanteau
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Old October 4th, 2013, 11:38 PM   #4290
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http://ict.uiuc.edu/railroad/IDOT220...e%20Report.pdf THe University of Illinois published a study on a Chicago-St Louis and Indianapolis route. The cost estimates are quite high but state are on par with other HSR projects.
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Old October 5th, 2013, 01:40 AM   #4291
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sopomon View Post
The name would be great, but in order to make it seem appealing to Americans and more precisely, Texans, I'm sure they're going to use some ludicrous think tank approved name.

My bet is on: Super Freedom Speed Eagle Transport Liberator. (Or at least something along those lines)
I thought they'd just slap "Amtrak" on the side and start running it.

If not 205 mph train I know a 125mph train would be better than any other option we have here in Texas in terms of efficient, cheaper long distance public transportation. MegaBus seems to be the best but it's limited to 75mph.
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Old October 6th, 2013, 05:51 AM   #4292
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The whole point of HSR is to attract plane and car users, not just to put bus companies out of business.
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Old October 6th, 2013, 06:47 AM   #4293
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I understand, I'm pointing out that bus is the only "affordable" as well as feasible long distance public transportation option available in Texas. There is Amtrak yet the service is slow. I took Amtrak from Dallas to Austin earlier this year, took 6 hours to make the trip.
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Old October 6th, 2013, 05:30 PM   #4294
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I understand, I'm pointing out that bus is the only "affordable" as well as feasible long distance public transportation option available in Texas. There is Amtrak yet the service is slow. I took Amtrak from Dallas to Austin earlier this year, took 6 hours to make the trip.
Right. Which is why I'm baffled when people insinuate that there's only a strong business case for improving service in the Northeast Corridor...

Actually, I feel this would be moving far more quickly if people realized how much this could improve efficiency in air travel. It's expensive to run these smaller shuttles between hubs. It's far cheaper to connect pairs of cities that already have large amounts of air traffic. It's not just about how close the cities are, it's about where people are traveling to.
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Old October 6th, 2013, 06:06 PM   #4295
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I'm so happy that this is spreading around the internet

http://www.upworthy.com/this-future-...of-the-u?c=bl3
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Old October 7th, 2013, 05:39 AM   #4296
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No offense, but that's actually quite old and not very helpful. There's no way HSR is feasible along a lot of those routes (distances, passengers served, terrain issues), and it only makes it look as though HSR bumpers are looking to create a literally national network which couldn't possibly compete with air travel along a lot of its networks, and therefore would require subsidies, be a "boondoggle" (that word still makes me gag; so overused in this context), etc., etc.
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Old October 7th, 2013, 06:44 PM   #4297
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Originally Posted by aquaticko View Post
No offense, but that's actually quite old and not very helpful. There's no way HSR is feasible along a lot of those routes (distances, passengers served, terrain issues), and it only makes it look as though HSR bumpers are looking to create a literally national network which couldn't possibly compete with air travel along a lot of its networks, and therefore would require subsidies, be a "boondoggle" (that word still makes me gag; so overused in this context), etc., etc.
That line of reasoning is a bit over-used, no?

True, very few people are going to take a train from Chicago to LA; however, that isn't the point of having a network. If that were the case, my city (in Southern Alabama, on the Gulf Coast), wouldn't have an airport: it barely makes any money and flights to anywhere are expensive because it doesn't serve many markets (i.e. just connects you to hubs). However, the need to travel supersedes that inconvenience.
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Old October 7th, 2013, 07:00 PM   #4298
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Originally Posted by phoenixboi08 View Post
That line of reasoning is a bit over-used, no?

True, very few people are going to take a train from Chicago to LA; however, that isn't the point of having a network. If that were the case, my city (in Southern Alabama, on the Gulf Coast), wouldn't have an airport: it barely makes any money and flights to anywhere are expensive because it doesn't serve many markets (i.e. just connects you to hubs). However, the need to travel supersedes that inconvenience.
I think the the link between Omaha and Salt Lake City, Between Denver & El-Paso and between San-Antonio & Tucson seem outrageous at this time. But the rest seem all seem to be feasible. When the more feasible lines get built the unconnected cities like Denver or Salt lake city will clamor for HSR connections.
On the same note was it or is it feasible to build/maintain interstates to connect to outlying cities/towns in Kansas, Colorado, Utah, Wyoming or Montana e.t.c?
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Old October 7th, 2013, 07:13 PM   #4299
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No offense, but that's actually quite old and not very helpful. There's no way HSR is feasible along a lot of those routes (distances, passengers served, terrain issues), and it only makes it look as though HSR bumpers are looking to create a literally national network which couldn't possibly compete with air travel along a lot of its networks, and therefore would require subsidies, be a "boondoggle" (that word still makes me gag; so overused in this context), etc., etc.
The immediate point of such a network is not the termini of the lines, but rather the intermediate and interchange stations in the middle; in other words, this will give the American Midwest the boost that it never really got.

If anyone hasn't noticed, the most crowded subway and metro rail stations are the interchange stations in the middle of the line, not the terminus stations. The NY-LA HSR route isn't so much about travelling from East Coast to West Coast; it's more about connecting New York to Chicago, Denver to Las Vegas, or Denver to Chicago--any city that is connected to an HSR line is suddenly part of a much larger group of cities. Going by that, the middle cities stand much more to benefit than the cities at the endpoints; HSR will invert the Midwest's curse of "having no access to either the East Coast or the West Coast" to suddenly "having access to the East Coast and the West Coast".

Right now, automobile-centric development is mostly radial; while HSR is certainly expensive, there is almost no research on the unlimited economic potential of large-scale axial growth, which is what any region newly connected by HSR can expect.
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Old October 8th, 2013, 12:09 AM   #4300
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That's all fair, but my criticism was really only aimed at those Western lines crossing vast distances that don't have a large population or substantial intra-regional travel, such that they'd be better served by simply upgrading currently-existing lines, as opposed to the new lines that'd have to be built to satisfy demand in most other parts of the country (both coasts, Midwest, Texas). And again, considering the Rocky Mts. which divide the western half of the country, the terrain works against the network pictured, too. I just shudder to think of giving any more reason for libertarians to rail against government spending on what is basically necessary infrastructure.

I've heard it said before that, essentially, everything east of the Mississippi River, Texas, and the West Coast should (save CA north of SF and southern Oregon) should have HSR service; that sounds about right to me.
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