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View Poll Results: Should the US build or improve it's HSR network?
Yes 249 89.57%
No 29 10.43%
Voters: 278. You may not vote on this poll

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Old October 8th, 2013, 01:03 AM   #4301
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I think it would be ideal to start off with main urban centers, and then slowly over the years, and decades, expand the system everywhere if it grows in popularity.
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Old October 8th, 2013, 10:37 PM   #4302
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I think we should just give up, accept the fact that it's not gonna happen in the next two decade. It's actually kinda sad to see this thread.
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Old October 9th, 2013, 05:57 AM   #4303
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hmmwv View Post
I think we should just give up, accept the fact that it's not gonna happen in the next two decade. It's actually kinda sad to see this thread.
You're forgetting that that was around the time that it took Japan to completely pull off what it pulled off (excluding the Tokaido Shinkansen), and that construction for Japan's maglev also (nearly) exceeds our lifetime.

Don't give up. If we do, you're letting the Tea Party win, because that's exactly what they're trying to do--wear you down until you give up and say, "see, it's not that important after all!"
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Old October 17th, 2013, 10:51 PM   #4304
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I was a bit bored today so I made a US high speed map akin to the European and Asian one on Wikipedia. I can see why nobody made on earlier. It is kinda empty... So I added a 'higher-speed' tier (110 mph/177 km/h). There are probally some errors in there So any corrections and suggestions to make it better are welcome.
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Old October 18th, 2013, 01:39 AM   #4305
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Nice map it was time! thanks for your contribution
Besides comparing to the rest of maps its like
but its great to see some projects are going on!
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Old October 18th, 2013, 03:18 AM   #4306
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Nice to see somewhat of a map
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Old October 18th, 2013, 08:15 AM   #4307
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Yes
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Old October 18th, 2013, 08:29 AM   #4308
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Great map! Now it's time to get some purple lines on that map.
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Old October 18th, 2013, 02:56 PM   #4309
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Maybe it's wise to mark "planed" and "u\c" differently?
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Old October 18th, 2013, 04:10 PM   #4310
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Well it was a bit difficult to decided how to include those lines. They are all pretty close to going under construction (or already are), or at least have a firm commitment (i.e. money assigned). In California, for example, the first construction contracts have been signed, but construction is yet to begin. And the part which is going to be constructed, is but a tiny part of the system (30 miles?) and wont see such high operating speeds for years after completion.

The only one which is really borderline included is the Florida proposal. They are still working out the financing, and there is no a definite construction date, but on the other hand, some land acquisition has taken place.

I agree it should perhaps be clearer, but I haven't figured out how to do it yet.


In the mean time I updated the map a bit:

*changed the 110 mph section around Albany to better correspond to the real situation.
*Included the New Haven-Springfield line as 110 mph under construction.
*Included the Black Hawk service (Amtrak: Chicago-Duburque)
*Changed the legend to correspond better to the European map and FRA speed tiers (probally also made it clearer)

And for fun I made a map which includes a few more or less serious proposals for high speed rail:


btw, the line from Raleigh to Richmond could probally also be included on the other map. Anyone have any good info on it?
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Old October 18th, 2013, 07:10 PM   #4311
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crownsteler View Post
I was a bit bored today so I made a US high speed map akin to the European and Asian one on Wikipedia. I can see why nobody made on earlier. It is kinda empty... So I added a 'higher-speed' tier (110 mph/177 km/h). There are probally some errors in there So any corrections and suggestions to make it better are welcome.
An important development would be to make all the brown lines capable of 110 mph, double tracked to the minimum and electrified. This will help in running more passenger trains and create a good foundation for passenger rail. HSR tracks can be laid down parallel to some routes where there is more demand.
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Old October 18th, 2013, 10:51 PM   #4312
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I'm not sure about the case of other city pairs but the current Austin to Ft. Worth/Dallas line for Amtrak takes 6 hours travel time. The way the line is currently set up it doesn't look feasible to get trains running 110mph unless the route between the cities is drastically changed. With all the construction they're doing on Interstate 35 I don't see why they could find a little right of way to add a good high speed line. It baffles me why we cannot just put High Speed rail in the wide medians of the current Interstate systems between cities that need it most. If the median is filled in then do it Chinese style and put up long bridges...that's my idea/opinion.
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Old October 18th, 2013, 11:00 PM   #4313
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FM 2258 View Post
It baffles me why we cannot just put High Speed rail in the wide medians of the current Interstate systems between cities that need it most.
Except for long straight sectors, the curve radii of the best designed freeways cannot cope with minimum radii necessary for operation of high speed trains on 200mph or more.
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Old October 19th, 2013, 02:22 AM   #4314
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FM 2258 View Post


I'm not sure about the case of other city pairs but the current Austin to Ft. Worth/Dallas line for Amtrak takes 6 hours travel time. The way the line is currently set up it doesn't look feasible to get trains running 110mph unless the route between the cities is drastically changed. With all the construction they're doing on Interstate 35 I don't see why they could find a little right of way to add a good high speed line. It baffles me why we cannot just put High Speed rail in the wide medians of the current Interstate systems between cities that need it most. If the median is filled in then do it Chinese style and put up long bridges...that's my idea/opinion.
I don't think it is that bad. Baring some small towns wherein the track may take 90 degree curves, much of the track is reasonably straight. The bottleneck points which are only a handful can be avoided by building underpasses/underground tunnels. Much of the route may just need upgradation of tracks and track-bed, eliminating some level crossings, improving signaling e.t.c. I feel this approach is better than directly building HSR tracks. I also feel HSR lines when built should run roughly parallel to these existing upgraded routes with an arrangement to to exchange trains with those lines near important towns. This way smaller towns can also be served by a few high speed services and some services can extend onto branch lines.
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Old October 20th, 2013, 08:13 PM   #4315
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Work begins on Calif. bullet train, locals angry



Quote:
FRESNO, Calif. (AP) -- Trucks loaded with tomatoes, milk and almonds clog the two main highways that bisect California's farm heartland, carrying goods to millions along the Pacific Coast and beyond. This dusty stretch of land is the starting point for one of the nation's most expensive public infrastructure projects: a $68 billion high-speed rail system that would span the state, linking the people of America's salad bowl to more jobs, opportunity and buyers.

Five years ago, California voters overwhelmingly approved the idea of bringing a bullet train to the nation's most populous state. It would be America's first high-speed rail system, sold to the public as a way to improve access to good-paying jobs, cut pollution from smog-filled roadways and reduce time wasted sitting in traffic while providing an alternative to high fuel prices.

Now, engineering work has finally begun on the first 30-mile segment of track here in Fresno, a city of a half-million people with soaring unemployment and a withering downtown core littered with abandoned factories and shuttered stores.

Rail is meant to help this place, with construction jobs now and improved access to economic opportunity once the job is complete. But the region that could benefit most from the project is also where opposition to it has grown most fierce.

"I just wish it would go away, this high-speed rail. I just wish it would go away," says Gary Lanfranco, whose restaurant in downtown Fresno is slated to be demolished to make way for rerouted traffic.

Such sentiments can be heard throughout the Central Valley, where roads are dotted with signs such as: "HERE COMES HIGH SPEED RAIL There goes the farm." Growers complain of misplaced priorities, and residents wonder if their tax money is being squandered.

Aaron Fukuda, a civil engineer whose house in the dairy town of Hanford lies directly in one of the possible train routes, says: "People are worn out, tired, frustrated."

Voters in 2008 approved $10 billion in bonds to start construction on an 800-mile rail line to ferry passengers between San Francisco and Los Angeles in 2 hours and 40 minutes, compared with 6 hours by car now during good traffic. Since then, the housing market collapsed, multibillion-dollar budget deficits followed, and the price tag has fluctuated wildly - from $45 billion in 2008 to more than $100 billion in 2011 and, now, $68 billion.

Political and financial compromises led officials to scale back plans that now mean trains will be forced to slow down and share tracks in major cities, leading critics to question whether it will truly be the 220-mph "high-speed rail" voters were promised.

Construction has been postponed repeatedly, and a court victory this summer by opponents threatens further delays; a Sacramento County Superior Court judge said the state rail authority's plan goes against the promise made to voters to identify all the funding for the first segment before starting construction.

Even the former chairman of the California High-Speed Rail Authority, Quentin Kopp, has turned against the current project, saying in court papers that it "is no longer a genuine high speed rail system."


[...]
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Old October 20th, 2013, 08:44 PM   #4316
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crownsteler View Post
I was a bit bored today so I made a US high speed map akin to the European and Asian one on Wikipedia. I can see why nobody made on earlier. It is kinda empty... So I added a 'higher-speed' tier (110 mph/177 km/h). There are probally some errors in there So any corrections and suggestions to make it better are welcome.
Nice map, but the average speeds on the Northeast corridor is below what's listed on the map unfortunately. The average speed between Philly and NYC for example is 76 mph or 123 kmh.
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Old October 20th, 2013, 08:47 PM   #4317
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The map shows not average, but the maxim allowed service speed, I suppose.
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Old October 20th, 2013, 09:41 PM   #4318
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There are quite a few city pairs in US where HSR would make perfect sense. I think you just need to build one full new route to a high standard and then it will become sufficiently popular that there will be a momentum on constructing more. Kind of like the new boom of constructing light rail in various American cities.
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Old October 20th, 2013, 09:44 PM   #4319
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desertpunk View Post
Why they can't build this line on bridges like they do in China? From what I see most of this line will be built at ground level. I'm glad this line is actually going forward....is it actually or are there going to be 20 more years of hurdles?
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Old October 20th, 2013, 09:50 PM   #4320
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I guess, It is more expensive to build the line on the bridges.
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