daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Railways

Railways (Inter)national commuter and freight trains



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


View Poll Results: Should the US build or improve it's HSR network?
Yes 249 89.57%
No 29 10.43%
Voters: 278. You may not vote on this poll

Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old January 17th, 2014, 09:22 PM   #4501
FM 2258
Registered User
 
FM 2258's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Austin
Posts: 5,438
Likes (Received): 612

Train to Mexico seems nice but hell, we need a network to connect Texas cities first.

It's very possible that the Mexico portion of the line will be completed in 2018 while the U.S. side is bogged down in route studies, environmental studies, and political bullcrap.
__________________

jonathaninATX liked this post

Last edited by FM 2258; January 17th, 2014 at 09:41 PM.
FM 2258 no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old January 18th, 2014, 05:33 AM   #4502
Innsertnamehere
insertoronto
 
Innsertnamehere's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Toronto
Posts: 3,959
Likes (Received): 680

I don't think you understand how illegal immigration works if you think HSR will bring in more illegal immigrants. not only is it hard to hide on a train, it is probably the most difficult ways to cross the border.. Most illegals simply walk across it in the middle of the desert, or hide in vehicles crossing at highway crossings. Hard to hide on a train when someone won't even let you on the train platform without checking your passport.


That said, you would think that a connection to Canada would be considered a bit more feasible, a Seattle - Vancouver link would probably work. maybe they should fix the border crossing issues AMTRAK currently has.. the Toronto-NYC service currently has a 2 hour wait at the border..
__________________

CNB30, FM 2258, cuartango, phoenixboi08 liked this post
Innsertnamehere no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 18th, 2014, 10:27 AM   #4503
Xoser_barcelona
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Barcelona
Posts: 109
Likes (Received): 47

Quote:
Originally Posted by mteregdl View Post
This comment is just as unfortunate as the one you've quoted.

It's been quite obvious that common people on US (excluding Arizona) have no longer the prejudices that existed in the past.
Mexican, Americans, Mexican Americans or whatever..who cares really. So what's happening with HSR in the US. I see a lot of text, very few photos and a lot of posing. I think I read somewhere they started earth works in California, is this true?
__________________

FM 2258 liked this post
Xoser_barcelona no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 18th, 2014, 12:12 PM   #4504
hmmwv
Registered User
 
hmmwv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Seattle
Posts: 2,391
Likes (Received): 420

HSR in the US is almost a taboo topic nowadays, that's why we don't see as many photos or news coverage in general.
__________________
The building under construction next to Shanghai Tower is Oriental Financial Center. The "plot" next to Jinmao is reserved green belt and no skyscraper will be built there.

FM 2258 liked this post
hmmwv no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 19th, 2014, 08:58 AM   #4505
GdlMty
BANNED
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Guadalajara
Posts: 1,483
Likes (Received): 8577

Monterrrey is a city of 4.4 million inhabitants, the GDP per capita is of 32,000 (similar to Montreal), thousands of people travel to San Antonio and back.

Many Americans do not know the reality of Mexico, I live in a border town and all the days are so full border bridges.

Just'm in Los Angeles and tomorrow I'm going to Ensenada.

__________________

sweet-d liked this post
GdlMty no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 19th, 2014, 02:23 PM   #4506
jonasry
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Gävle
Posts: 312
Likes (Received): 147

The border between San Diego and Tijuana seems crazy full all the time. I'm generally in favour of cheaper solutions and on that stretch there's already a fully functional railway which could be used for regional trips.
jonasry no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 19th, 2014, 05:45 PM   #4507
FM 2258
Registered User
 
FM 2258's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Austin
Posts: 5,438
Likes (Received): 612

I've been at the border between Texas and Mexico, worse than the wait is breathing in all the exhaust fumes!
__________________

SAS 16 liked this post
FM 2258 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 19th, 2014, 06:26 PM   #4508
Suburbanist
on the road
 
Suburbanist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: the rain capital of Europe
Posts: 27,525
Likes (Received): 21227

Quote:
Originally Posted by jonasry View Post
The border between San Diego and Tijuana seems crazy full all the time. I'm generally in favour of cheaper solutions and on that stretch there's already a fully functional railway which could be used for regional trips.
The traffic jams are not related to volume of highway traffic itself, but the queues for border checks.

Trains would be just stopped for couple hours until CBP agents check everyone.
__________________
YIMBY - Yes, in my backyard!
Suburbanist no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 19th, 2014, 07:02 PM   #4509
XAN_
Registered User
 
XAN_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,034
Likes (Received): 760

Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
The traffic jams are not related to volume of highway traffic itself, but the queues for border checks.

Trains would be just stopped for couple hours until CBP agents check everyone.
Actually, checks can be carried in the rolling train.
__________________
"I'm lost but still I know//There is another world"
-H. Kürsch, 1995
"Well, we all know there's no other side"
-H. Kürsch, 2002
XAN_ no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 19th, 2014, 07:31 PM   #4510
Suburbanist
on the road
 
Suburbanist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: the rain capital of Europe
Posts: 27,525
Likes (Received): 21227

Quote:
Originally Posted by XAN_ View Post
Actually, checks can be carried in the rolling train.
No way that CBP would ever agree to that.
__________________
YIMBY - Yes, in my backyard!
Suburbanist no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 19th, 2014, 08:03 PM   #4511
fskobic
jarunac
 
fskobic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Amsterdam/Zagreb
Posts: 733
Likes (Received): 213

Quote:
Originally Posted by XAN_ View Post
Actually, checks can be carried in the rolling train.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
No way that CBP would ever agree to that.
If you go for the rolling train option, the control can start long before the train reaches the border, so when it does, everyone's already cleared.

But in most cases when HSR crosses international borders, the passport check is done at the station of departure (just like with airplanes and airports). You can't even board the train if you're not cleared.
__________________

sweet-d liked this post
fskobic no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 19th, 2014, 09:25 PM   #4512
XAN_
Registered User
 
XAN_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,034
Likes (Received): 760

Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
No way that CBP would ever agree to that.
Why?
__________________
"I'm lost but still I know//There is another world"
-H. Kürsch, 1995
"Well, we all know there's no other side"
-H. Kürsch, 2002
XAN_ no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 19th, 2014, 09:52 PM   #4513
Suburbanist
on the road
 
Suburbanist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: the rain capital of Europe
Posts: 27,525
Likes (Received): 21227

Quote:
Originally Posted by fskobic View Post
If you go for the rolling train option, the control can start long before the train reaches the border, so when it does, everyone's already cleared.
The Mexican-American border is one of the most dangerous in the World, they need heavy-armed law enforcement and I don't think Mexico would be willing to deputize CBP agents to operate within its territory or US doing the same for the Policia Federal de Mexico.


Quote:
But in most cases when HSR crosses international borders, the passport check is done at the station of departure (just like with airplanes and airports). You can't even board the train if you're not cleared.
AFAIK, there is just one HSR route crossing borders that are regularly checked - the Eurostar from London to France.
__________________
YIMBY - Yes, in my backyard!
Suburbanist no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 20th, 2014, 01:07 AM   #4514
fskobic
jarunac
 
fskobic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Amsterdam/Zagreb
Posts: 733
Likes (Received): 213

Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
AFAIK, there is just one HSR route crossing borders that are regularly checked - the Eurostar from London to France.
Yeah, I took the Eurostar a few times, and I think that's the most efficient way to deal with border control in HSR. If the US-Mexico HSR ever happens, I'm guessing they'll use this setup.
__________________

CNB30, FM 2258 liked this post
fskobic no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 20th, 2014, 02:15 PM   #4515
jonasry
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Gävle
Posts: 312
Likes (Received): 147

Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
The traffic jams are not related to volume of highway traffic itself, but the queues for border checks.

Trains would be just stopped for couple hours until CBP agents check everyone.
According to Wikipedia 300,000 persons crosses the border daily. That's a fairly large amount of highway traffic! And it's not impossible to simplify border crossings, look for example at the border between Finland and Russia which is a high-security border but when on the high-speed trains passports, luggage and visas are checked onboard.
jonasry no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 20th, 2014, 11:36 PM   #4516
skyscraperhighrise
Registered User
 
skyscraperhighrise's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Posts: 1,267
Likes (Received): 1084

Quote:
Originally Posted by Innsertnamehere View Post
I don't think you understand how illegal immigration works if you think HSR will bring in more illegal immigrants. not only is it hard to hide on a train, it is probably the most difficult ways to cross the border.. Most illegals simply walk across it in the middle of the desert, or hide in vehicles crossing at highway crossings. Hard to hide on a train when someone won't even let you on the train platform without checking your passport
and we need to fix our borders first.
__________________
Left/Right it doesn't matter anymore, you still get bigger government, no matter who's in power.

Democrips and rebloodlicans aka democrats and republicans, two wings of the same bird of prey

thankfully i'm a libertarian constitutionalist.

#standwithrand

R.I.P. QuantumX, you will never be forgotten.
skyscraperhighrise no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 21st, 2014, 06:06 AM   #4517
sacto7654
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Sacramento
Posts: 796
Likes (Received): 283

I think one of the first American HSR projects that could start construction fairly soon is the Texas Central Railway project, which will initially link Houston with the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

Here's why it could happen pretty fast once the approval is given:

1. A major partner in this project is the Central Japan Railway Company (JR Central), the company that operates the Tokaidō Shinkansen between Tokyo and Shin-Osaka stations. JR Central proposes a modified N700A trainset in an 8- to 10-car trainset configuration, with a top speed of 330 km/h (205 mph), the so-called N700-I trainset. This means huge savings, because we don't have to develop a new trainset design from scratch and the companies in Japan that are building the N700A trainsets now (Hitachi and Nippon Sharyo) could start building the N700-I almost immediately for the TCR project.

2. The topography of the land between Dallas and Houston is relatively flat, which means rail line construction costs will be fairly reasonable, since the rail line does not need long mountain tunnels or earthquake effect mitigation like the California HSR system requires.
__________________

desertpunk, FM 2258 liked this post
sacto7654 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 21st, 2014, 06:10 AM   #4518
sombra2
ちょっと!
 
sombra2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: UAE
Posts: 24
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
No way that CBP would ever agree to that.
Why not? this happens on hundreds of trains all around the world...
sombra2 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 21st, 2014, 06:32 AM   #4519
CNB30
centralnatbankbuildingrva
 
CNB30's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: New York (Brooklyn)/Richmond/Philadelphia
Posts: 2,575
Likes (Received): 805

I also Imagine the NE HSR Idea will be put into Place as there is already great demand for HSR in the area, and I would Imagine that (considering trains in the area run profitably), we could get support from a number of fiscal conservatives when acquiring funding, overcoming roadblocks, etc.
__________________
High speed rail=real energy independence!

A developed country is not a place where the poor have cars. It’s where the rich use public transportation

Feel The Bern #2016

FM 2258 liked this post
CNB30 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 21st, 2014, 06:52 AM   #4520
FM 2258
Registered User
 
FM 2258's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Austin
Posts: 5,438
Likes (Received): 612

Quote:
Originally Posted by sacto7654 View Post
I think one of the first American HSR projects that could start construction fairly soon is the Texas Central Railway project, which will initially link Houston with the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

Here's why it could happen pretty fast once the approval is given:

1. A major partner in this project is the Central Japan Railway Company (JR Central), the company that operates the Tokaidō Shinkansen between Tokyo and Shin-Osaka stations. JR Central proposes a modified N700A trainset in an 8- to 10-car trainset configuration, with a top speed of 330 km/h (205 mph), the so-called N700-I trainset. This means huge savings, because we don't have to develop a new trainset design from scratch and the companies in Japan that are building the N700A trainsets now (Hitachi and Nippon Sharyo) could start building the N700-I almost immediately for the TCR project.

2. The topography of the land between Dallas and Houston is relatively flat, which means rail line construction costs will be fairly reasonable, since the rail line does not need long mountain tunnels or earthquake effect mitigation like the California HSR system requires.
A link between Houston and Dallas would do wonders for people who hate the long drive on Interstate 45. Austin to San Antonio is another great line to build. I think if these two lines are built first, they could really make money and provide a great example for how high speed rail (unlike current Acela) will be beneficial in other places.
FM 2258 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
amtrak, desertxpress, fly california, high speed rail, northeast corridor, texas triangle, united states

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 10:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium