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View Poll Results: Should the US build or improve it's HSR network?
Yes 249 89.57%
No 29 10.43%
Voters: 278. You may not vote on this poll

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Old March 26th, 2016, 09:04 AM   #6281
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Dude that was three years ago
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Old March 26th, 2016, 06:23 PM   #6282
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Originally Posted by sdery View Post
Is the Texas Central Railway project getting closer to construction or are they still working through the planning phase? I think this project could be very successful as the construction costs should be significantly lower than the CAHSR project given the flat terrain and existing corridors. Only downside is that there are not currently planning for a downtown Houston station (at least in the first phase).
I've been following the TCR project for awhile now, and currently, the company is awaiting an Environmental Report from the Federal Railroad Commission (I believe this who's conducting it, but I'm not quite sure) so that a final approved route can be nailed down. Once this comes out (mid-summer) then TCR expects to begin construction towards the end of the year/early next year. Currently, survey crews are traveling through the state surveying the proposed route (Utility Route), while a joint venture between Archer Western Contractors and Ferrovial Agroman US Corp (Dallas to Houston Constructors) is working on engineering and pre-construction.
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Old March 26th, 2016, 07:55 PM   #6283
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Originally Posted by Yeezus2 View Post
I've been following the TCR project for awhile now, and currently, the company is awaiting an Environmental Report from the Federal Railroad Commission (I believe this who's conducting it, but I'm not quite sure) so that a final approved route can be nailed down. Once this comes out (mid-summer) then TCR expects to begin construction towards the end of the year/early next year. Currently, survey crews are traveling through the state surveying the proposed route (Utility Route), while a joint venture between Archer Western Contractors and Ferrovial Agroman US Corp (Dallas to Houston Constructors) is working on engineering and pre-construction.
Really? What about acquiring all the private property needed for construction, some no doubt via eminent domain? Surely there will be lawsuits left and right... It should be easier than in California because of terrain and no public money, but I think they are dreaming if they expect no serious opposition.
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Old March 26th, 2016, 08:16 PM   #6284
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Siemens charger locomotives


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Old March 28th, 2016, 12:15 AM   #6285
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Noice!! Hopeully Michigan can get it's Talgo Cars and the other states can get their Nippon Sharyo Bi-levels on time.
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Old March 28th, 2016, 04:36 AM   #6286
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Really? What about acquiring all the private property needed for construction, some no doubt via eminent domain? Surely there will be lawsuits left and right... It should be easier than in California because of terrain and no public money, but I think they are dreaming if they expect no serious opposition.
The can start on construction on the portions that they already own, and continue to buy the remaining areas at the same time. They do have ED authority, but as a private company, are not required to only pay market value prices, and as a private company, can pay whatever is necessary to obtain the land.
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Old March 29th, 2016, 08:28 AM   #6287
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Changes could add hundreds of millions of dollars to first 29 miles of bullet train



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The California rail authority is facing hundreds of millions of dollars in potential change orders and other prospective cost increases on the first 29 miles of the bullet train system, state and private contractor documents show.

The change orders and other claims are coming from construction firms, utilities and railroads involved in that first segment, according to the documents.

Several of the biggest claims and change orders could cost 10% to more than 30% above original estimates for the segment, which is to run between Madera and Fresno. Scores of smaller claims could mean additional spending.

Higher costs for the first construction phase of the project would carry implications for the entire $64-billion system.
http://www.latimes.com/local/califor...328-story.html
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Old March 29th, 2016, 07:04 PM   #6288
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Changes could add hundreds of millions of dollars to first 29 miles of bullet train
I realize the author of this article is known to be biased again the CAHSR project but still surprised by the facts presented.

First off, the suggestion that the change orders will add "hundreds of millions" to the cost of the first segment over looks the fact that (1) there is already a contingency factored into the budget to cover change orders and (2) many of the change orders will either be reduced or declined. How difficult could it be to create a simple table in the article showing the numbers to back up his claims?

As for some of the quotes in the article:

Quote:
A detailed analysis of the bullet train project by Elizabeth Alexis, a private investment manager and cofounder of a Bay Area group critical of the project, asserts that the Central Valley construction segment from Madera to near Bakersfield is now about $1.2 billion above the 2012 budget of $5.8 billion — a 21% jump. A spreadsheet that details the changes was submitted to the Legislature and the rail authority.

"Their plans change all the time, so it is hard to track on an apples-to-apples basis how their costs have changed," she said. "None of their documents allow this direct comparison."
So they have conducted a detailed analysis but admit they don't know how costs have changed. Add the fact that the individual is part of a group opposed to the project, it is difficult to accept their analysis as unbiased.

Quote:
"When they awarded Tutor the contract, the state owned three or four pieces of property," Lawson said. "That was pretty stupid. If they can build this for [$64 billion] like the liars say, I say build it. But when it gets to $150 billion they are going to be in deep trouble."
Since when did it become acceptable to quote people in news articles engaged in name calling and insults, "that was pretty stupid", "like the liars say"? This is the type of verbal garbage that normally fills the comments section but should not be in the article. As for the comments themselves...I believe the decision to award the contract quickly, ie before the land parcels had all been purchased, was a result of the deadline to spend the money by a certain date or risk losing the funding. To be fair, Lawson is familiar with mismanaging projects drive up costs for the state...

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Old March 29th, 2016, 07:08 PM   #6289
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...it also neglects to mention that some of the change orders involve extensions of the scope of the construction segment (CS), so I would hope they didn't actually include those costs in these estimates, since they're technically future costs that are being incurred earlier than anticipated. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
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Old March 30th, 2016, 12:59 AM   #6290
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Opposition to the CAHSR project has long been far more about scaring those already opposed into greater opposition than it has been about anything genuinely wrong with the project. Why the LA Times continues to publish a word Vartabedian writes on the subject is beyond me. I'm not an LA resident; is the LA Times known for being conservatively-skewed?
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Old March 30th, 2016, 06:00 AM   #6291
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I'm not an LA resident; is the LA Times known for being conservatively-skewed?
Not really. The Orange County Register tends to be the more right-leaning newspaper in the area.
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Old March 30th, 2016, 07:48 PM   #6292
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I'm not an LA resident; is the LA Times known for being conservatively-skewed?
No, the LA Times is one of the most left-leaning major newspapers in the country, at least according to this UCLA study:

Quote:
Of the 20 major media outlets studied, 18 scored left of center, with CBS' "Evening News," The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times ranking second, third and fourth most liberal behind the news pages of The Wall Street Journal.

http://newsroom.ucla.edu/releases/Me...inds-UCLA-6664
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Old March 30th, 2016, 08:51 PM   #6293
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So is repeatedly publishing the writings of someone with a perpetual conservative slant on this issue their version of balance?
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Old March 31st, 2016, 08:58 AM   #6294
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Siemens shows first complete Charger locomotive

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Siemens displayed its first completed Charger diesel-electric locomotive when Federal Railroad Administrator Sarah E Feinberg visited its Sacramento manufacturing plant on March 26. The states of Illinois, California, Michigan, Missouri, Washington and Maryland have ordered a total of 66 Charger locomotives which will be powered by Cummins QSK95 diesel engines. The Sacramento plant is also currently producing ACS-64 electric locomotives for Amtrak and SEPTA, passenger trainsets with Charger locomotives for All Abroad Florida’s future Brightline service, and light rail vehicles for Calgary, Denver, Minneapolis–Saint Paul and San Francisco.
The Sacramento plant has been in operation for more than 30 years and employs more than 850 people. It was recently expanded by 11 600 m2, and Siemens said it plans to create more than 200 manufacturing jobs over the next 18 months.
‘Rail is essential today but will be even more so in the future’, said Feinberg. ‘During my visit to this plant, one with a huge number of employees, I saw that Siemens is building locomotives and equipment not just for right now, but they’re also building for the future of rail travel which is a great success story.’
http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/t...ocomotive.html
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Old March 31st, 2016, 09:14 AM   #6295
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So is repeatedly publishing the writings of someone with a perpetual conservative slant on this issue their version of balance?
Aqua, the LAT is in bad financial shape, like a lot of newspapers in the US. Ralph Vartabedian is known as a kind of muckraker, with experience covering the defense industry beat back in the eighties/nineties. Given that most Southern Californians are at best indifferent to HSR, it probably helps to sell papers by having someone try to give a negative slant to the whole project.
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Old April 5th, 2016, 07:26 AM   #6296
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USA Is#19 Out Of 20 In New High-Speed Rail Ranking

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A new ranking of high-speed rail networks from GoEuro, a travel search engine, puts the U.S. 19th out of the 20 countries assessed. According to the survey, the U.S. ranks below Turkey and Uzbekistan. Like all surveys, this one may have some flaws in its methodology. It emphasizes the percentage of the population that has access to high-speed rail travel in each country, which makes sense. High-speed rail isn’t much help if most people can’t use it. By that measure, the US ranked next to last of the 20 countries in the survey. Only 3.7% of Americans have access to high-speed rail service.
But the second criteria is the maximum speed possible on a country’s trains. That factor is far less relevant than the number of trains within a country that offer high-speed rail service. Grist argues that it is far more beneficial to have 10 trains that are capable of travelling at 150 mph than one train that can go 250 mph.
By rights, the US shouldn’t have been in the survey at all. High-speed rail is defined as being capable of speeds of 150 mph or more. Only a tiny portion of the Northeast rail corridor between Boston and Washington, DC, is capable of such speeds. People in China can travel from Beijing to Shanghai — a distance of 819 miles — in 5 hours. Taking Amtrak roughly the same distance along the East Coast of the U.S. from New York to Charleston, S.C., takes more than 13 hours. That is assuming the train is on time, which it seldom is.




High-speed rail leaders Japan, South Korea, China, and France are ranked as the top four nations. Spain, which is persistently economically troubled, ranks fifth. None of these countries has as high a GDP per capita as the U.S., so the problem in America isn’t lack of resources, it’s a lack of political will.
“After a half century of neglect, America now has a railroad system that the Bolivians would be ashamed of,” wrote James Howard Kunstler, in 2006. “There isn’t another project we could do that would have a greater impact on our oil consumption than fixing our rail system and restoring passenger service.” Ten years later, little has changed. Republicans in Congress have become virulently opposed to funding high-speed rail projects, preferring to divert funds from the national treasury to help pad the pockets of their friends in the oil business and sell arms to our friends and enemies alike.
https://cleantechnica.com/2016/03/29...-rail-ranking/
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Old April 7th, 2016, 06:23 AM   #6297
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Brightline train is taking shape


https://twitter.com/GoBrightline?lang=en

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Old April 7th, 2016, 07:58 PM   #6298
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Diesel? Really?
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Old April 7th, 2016, 10:45 PM   #6299
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American freight companies are too cheap to install electrification, also it would require them to abandon current loading gauges which are specifically designed to move massive amounts of freight, which is very profitable. So yes diesel, really.
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Old April 8th, 2016, 12:32 AM   #6300
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I think those diesel loco info should be in the conventional US railway thread.
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