daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Railways

Railways (Inter)national commuter and freight trains



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


View Poll Results: Should the US build or improve it's HSR network?
Yes 249 89.57%
No 29 10.43%
Voters: 278. You may not vote on this poll

Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old April 20th, 2016, 08:30 AM   #6321
Tower Dude
Registered User
 
Tower Dude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: 76th Street Station
Posts: 1,044
Likes (Received): 593

Even though MARC is phasing out its electric locomotives?
__________________

"Make no small plans they lack the magic to stir men's blood!" - Daniel Burnham

"The scale is Roman and will have to be sustained."
- Charles Follen McKim (In a letter to a friend concerning the design of Penn Station)
Tower Dude no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old April 20th, 2016, 11:57 AM   #6322
Bulbous
Registered User
 
Bulbous's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Perth
Posts: 328
Likes (Received): 153

Quote:
Originally Posted by hammersklavier View Post
Hah I am well-versed in the story of the Milwaukee's epic mismanagement. Going from "most profitable transcon" to "bankrupt" in a decade takes more than just incompetence, it takes a sort of anti-competence where total incompetents would do a better job than you.

The argument I'm referencing is essentially that the initial electrification project in the '20s destroyed the Milwaukee's long-term capital reserves. Unlike, say, the Rock Island, which was able to keep running some 20ish years after it became functionally insolvent (it last posted a profit in the late '50s IIRC), the Milwaukee simply didn't have the reserves necessary to weather storms.
True, the story makes for a depressing read.
Bulbous no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 20th, 2016, 01:24 PM   #6323
00Zy99
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 2,980
Likes (Received): 1506

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fan Railer View Post
The NJT multilevels are NOT certified for 125. The ALP-45s are (or at least they were tested with the Amtrak Viewliners. MARC is certifying theirs now because they actually run their Penn Line trains at 125, and would like to use the MLVs on that line with the electric locomotives. When it comes time, NJT will have to run their own 125 certification tests on their MLVs.
What about the Kawasaki bilevel that was in the consist? Are they certified already?

I seem to recall that MARC already ran trains at 125, so they would have to be, right?
00Zy99 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 22nd, 2016, 02:04 AM   #6324
Nexis
Dark Wolf
 
Nexis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Along the Rails of North Jersey..
Posts: 15,684
Likes (Received): 17032

Update from Yesterday 4/20/16

Newer Catenary posts have reached Princeton JCT...


New Catenary post near Princeton JCT
by Corey Best, on Flickr


New Northeast Catenary Posts...
by Corey Best, on Flickr


New Northeast Catenary Posts...
by Corey Best, on Flickr


New Northeast Catenary Posts...
by Corey Best, on Flickr
__________________
My FLICKR Page < 54,100+ Photos of Urban Renewal , Infrastructure , Food and Nature in the Northeastern US
Visit the Reorganized New York City Section
My Photography Website
Visit the New Jersey Section

CNB30, dimlys1994, FM 2258 liked this post
Nexis no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 27th, 2016, 05:05 AM   #6325
Buffaboy
Buffalo's Idealist💡
 
Buffaboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Buffalo Southtowns, New York
Posts: 3,818
Likes (Received): 2122

Quote:
Originally Posted by fubo View Post
Hi speed rail in the works for Buffalo Rochester corridor http://www.democratandchronicle.com/...aybe/83561430/
__
Buffaboy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 27th, 2016, 06:51 AM   #6326
prageethSL
Registered User
 
prageethSL's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Tomorrowland
Posts: 1,240
Likes (Received): 3033

California High speed rail progress

Fresno river viaduct






San Joaquin Viaduct




Realign Highway 99 from Ashlan Ave. to Clinton Ave. in Fresno.






Cedar Viaduct in south Fresno.






Tuolumne Street Bridge reconstruction



CaliforniaHighSpeedRail
__________________
We are all drops of awareness, in an ocean of consciousness.
prageethSL no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 27th, 2016, 07:45 AM   #6327
Anday
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Maryland
Posts: 2,316
Likes (Received): 1049

Mr Smith goes to Washington: election lessons on the path of the 'Acela primary'


Quote:
As five north-east states prepare to vote in primaries on Tuesday, David Smith hopped on a train going from Rhode Island to Washington DC and picked people’s brains about ‘the most comical election’ some have ever seen


Quote:
Baseball fields, sweeping coastlines, highways and scrapyards, graffiti-coated concrete, rows of yellow school buses, stars and stripes flying from flagpoles, clapboard houses and deep forests as painted by Edward Hopper, boarded-up redbrick terraced houses as filmed by The Wire’s David Simon, skyscrapers in New York as framed by a million camera clicks.

I grew up in Britain but such is America’s cultural reach: these images have always felt familiar. On Thursday I saw them all, and many more, from that seemingly most un-American means of transport, in the land where car is king: the train.
http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2...d-pennsylvania
__________________

dimlys1994 liked this post
Anday no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 27th, 2016, 07:46 AM   #6328
Anday
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Maryland
Posts: 2,316
Likes (Received): 1049

Who is going to pay for the bullet train to L.A.?



Quote:
The California High Speed Rail Authority's newly revised business plan faces up to a hard truth: Money is tight. If the agency is going to complete the first leg of a commercially viable bullet train on time and on budget, it has to build the first segment in Northern California and postpone the more difficult route over the Tehachapi Mountains to Los Angeles. That may be a reasonable shift given the funding constraints. But left unsaid in the draft 2016 business plan is how exactly the authority will get the money to build the bullet train to Southern California.

That is a big worry. High-speed rail is supposed to be the backbone of a faster, cleaner, more modern transportation system that connects the state's major population centers. The new plan, however, provides a clear path to building the line just from downtown San Jose to the Central Valley, which it says it will complete by 2025. In fact, the authority hasn't secured the money to build the route between two sizable cities; instead, the funds and the rail line would peter out in some farmland near Shafter, about 20 miles north of Bakersfield. The authority is trying to get another $3billion from the federal government to extend the first segment to San Francisco and Bakersfield, which would boost ridership and make the line more appealing to private investors.
http://www.latimes.com/opinion/edito...418-story.html
__________________

dimlys1994 liked this post
Anday no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 27th, 2016, 07:49 AM   #6329
Anday
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Maryland
Posts: 2,316
Likes (Received): 1049

High-speed rail is just part of a bigger role for trains in California's transit future


Quote:
California is the most car-crazed state in the nation and Orange County is adjacent to its sclerotic, freeway-choked heart.

But Darrell Johnson, CEO of the Orange County Transportation Authority, believes high-speed rail in the state is making a mistake by selling itself as a fast way to get from the Bay Area to LA when it ought to be seen as a key element of a statewide public transit network with a large rail component that can be cleaner and equally as convenient a travel option as the automobile.
http://www.bizjournals.com/sanjose/n...-role-for.html
__________________

dimlys1994 liked this post
Anday no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2016, 08:44 PM   #6330
Gusiluz
Jaén (Spain)
 
Gusiluz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 6,578
Likes (Received): 10868

Number of high-speed passenger

Passengers in Acela HS trains (millions)
2001:
2002: 3,214
2003: 2,363
2004: 2,569
2005: 1,773
2006: 2,668
2007: 3,191
2008: 3,399
2009: 3,020
2010: 3,219
2011: 3,379
2012: 3,395
2013: 3,343
2014: 3,545
2015:
TOTAL: 39,079

Source: 2003/2012 Intercity Passenger Rail Productivity in the Northeast Corridor. Page 119
2014 y 2013 Amtrak-FY2014
Acela 2002 includes Metroliner.

Passengers-km (or miles) data would be appreciated

Passengers and Passengers-kilometers world data, and explanation of the fact that the operators and the UIC count -in some cases- the number of passengers on high-speed trains, not on high-speed lines.
Gusiluz no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2016, 11:21 PM   #6331
Anday
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Maryland
Posts: 2,316
Likes (Received): 1049

For faster train travel, Amtrak wants to fix railway bottlenecks in Maryland



Quote:
As Amtrak trains whisk passengers hundreds of miles along the East Coast between Boston and Washington, they're forced to slow down at four pinch points in Maryland, where ancient railroad infrastructure can't accommodate the high speeds and capacity of modern train technology.

Officials have begun planning to fix two of the bottlenecks, the Susquehanna River Rail Bridge, which opened 110 years ago, and the even older Baltimore and Potomac Tunnel, built under the city in the decade after the Civil War.

Eliminating those choke points would speed up travel along the Northeast Corridor, officials say, bringing Amtrak closer to its goal: a two-hour trip between New York and Washington.

Paying for it, however, is another issue.

While Congress has funded the relatively inexpensive planning studies, replacing the Susquehanna River Rail Bridge project could take up to a decade and cost between $800 million and $1 billion, according to Amtrak estimates. The B&P Tunnel is a $4 billion project. Neither has been funded for construction.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/mar...502-story.html
Anday no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2016, 11:25 PM   #6332
Anday
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Maryland
Posts: 2,316
Likes (Received): 1049

High Speed Rail Proposed Between Rochester & Buffalo

Quote:
There's talk about high speed rail again in Upstate New York, but this time in a more limited fashion.

Congresswoman Louise Slaughter has been a big proponent of improving passenger rail service in the upstate area for some time now, including trying to get state and federal funding to explore the possibility of high speed rail.

But now she's talking about a shorter stretch of track for that kind of service, between Buffalo and Rochester, and the Fairport Democrat is working with Buffalo area Congressman Brian Higgins to try and accomplish that.

Slaughter says cutting the travel time between the two cities would allow people to commute more easily to take advantage of growing technology jobs, such as the SolarCity project in Buffalo and AIM Photonics in Rochester.

“There would be people who could move back and forth in half an hour on some high speed rail and the workforce could move from one place to the other depending on their skills without having to move from where they live,” Slaughter told WXXI News.

New York's upstate congressional delegates have pushed for years for a high-speed rail system linking the region's largest cities with New York City. Higgins says refocusing the effort on the 70-mile stretch between upstate New York's two largest cities would be far less costly.
http://wxxinews.org/post/high-speed-...hester-buffalo
__________________

mrsmartman liked this post
Anday no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2016, 11:30 PM   #6333
Anday
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Maryland
Posts: 2,316
Likes (Received): 1049

Texas Central Railroad, High Speed Rail will require local dirt, gravel and sand to build a 25 foot high and 100 foot wide earthen berm


Quote:
Texas Central (TCR) High Speed Rail claims in their recent ad in numerous local newspapers that “Even before the trains start running, the communities along the route will begin to reap the economic benefits.” The arrogance of TCR to think that the citizenry is that ignorant to not see the truth! The real truth is the opposite. The lands where the rails are to be laid the property owners are currently losing values. And with no train station how can there be any economic benefit, except lost revenue and taxes from destroyed businesses and agricultural land.

The latest news is the Texas Central Railroad, High Speed Rail will require local dirt, gravel and sand to build a 25 foot high and 100 foot wide earthen berm. We have been informed that TCR will legally have a 4 mile wide construction path to condemn local land owners property then take the earthen berm materials , which for Ellis County requires a minimum of 17.6 Million Cubic Yards.

“Texas Transportation Code § 112.053. § 112.053. Condemnation of Property: When Railroad Company and Owner Disagree. (b) A railroad company may not, under this section, condemn property that is located more than two miles from the company’s right of way.” That is 2 miles on either side of the rail corridor.

Visualize the four mile wide construction site with large heavy equipment, trucks, and vehicles moving local fill dirt and railroad material as needed. Then add the alignment of city and county roads to achieve fewer underpasses resulting in more private land taken by eminent domain, including the high speed rail (HSR) path requires an access road (more private property taken) to be added alongside the 100 foot wide rail line. Further, include the easement rights on private land to accommodate new power lines (every so many miles from the Electric Utility Corridor to the HSR) for the electric run trains, then add construction equipment and thousands of workers.

Finally all the land that has been ravaged by construction equipment taking dirt, gravel and sand from local property, and you have an economic and environmental disaster that is almost beyond comprehension. This path of destruction would make an F- 5 tornado path look like a bike trail in comparison. That scenario could dramatically reduce the economy for each county affected by estimates of up to 25% or higher.

To clarify, the viaducts that TCR has advertised are elevated with concrete pillars (as seen in others countries) are very expensive to construct and are only required for wetlands or environment protected land not for rolling or flat farm land.This HSR is an environmental disaster that will destroy the economies, communities and rural family lifestyle that are the heart of Texas.

Add the loss of revenue from business and agricultural, including the loss of property values and lost taxes, etc. Schools, emergency services, county taxes, to name a few will suffer greatly. Every HSR in the world is subsidized except in Greater Tokyo, that means no tax revenue or any funds for Texas communities.

TCR is hiding behind the protective claim of a private company to deny open records by the public, while receiving public funds and government assistance and recently asking for state and federal government guarantee loans. They even refuse to release their ridership analysis. TCR had their legal team conceal documents that appear to tell a different story then what the public is being told, that is why the recent law suit by Texans Against HSR request to have the records opened for public access. TCR is in partnership with a foreign company who is a major stakeholder in the HSR and will have eminent domain rights over Texas property owners. Why is the environmental friendly main stream media silent, even in the face of growing strong public opposition to the HSR?
http://localnewsonly.com/2016/04/tex...-earthen-berm/
__________________

mrsmartman liked this post
Anday no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2016, 11:37 PM   #6334
Anday
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Maryland
Posts: 2,316
Likes (Received): 1049

​California bullet train project gets key approval


Quote:
The board that oversees California's high-speed rail project approved a revised $64 billion plan Thursday that calls for the train to go from the Central Valley to the San Jose area before it heads to Southern California, acknowledging the political reality that federal and private financing has fallen far short of what backers had hoped.

The board gave its approved at a brief meeting in Sacramento, a week after postponing a planned vote to make changes to the revised business plan.

Central Valley lawmakers and activists complained vocally after a planned stop in Merced already under construction was left out of the most recent proposal for the bullet train released this winter, prompting officials to reverse course again last week and restore the stop.

Rail board Chairman Dan Richard stressed Thursday that high-speed rail officials heard the complaints of Madera and Merced officials who were outraged when they learned plans called for their cities to be cut out of the first phase of work.

"What came out was a really vital sense of how important this connection was for including those regions," he said.

High-speed rail CEO Jeff Morales told the board last week that the state will spend $4 billion in Southern California to prepare for the bullet train, seeking to reassure worried officials that a recent change in plans calling for the train to head first to San Jose might mean the train never makes it to the Los Angeles area.

Richard added Thursday: "While San Jose may get trains first, you're likely to see dollars first in Los Angeles County and in Anaheim."

Rail officials have pitched the first segment between the Central Valley and San Jose for $21 billion as the only way to ensure a useable segment gets built with the existing funding available.

The changes also include adding a station in Wasco, near Bakersfield.

The new plan avoids the expensive and tricky engineering work required to tunnel through the Tehachapi mountains in Southern California delaying those residents' complaints for a while.

The first stretch would begin operating in 2025, three years later and 50 miles shorter than the original planned route that would have first connected to the San Fernando Valley.

The authority is required by law to update its business plan every two years and proposals and funding projects for the system have frequently changed, leading to criticism that the latest proposal is no more likely to become reality than any of the others.

Gov. Jerry Brown has remained a supporter of the project, which he maintains will help cut carbon emissions.
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/californ...-key-approval/
__________________

mrsmartman liked this post
Anday no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2016, 11:39 PM   #6335
Anday
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Maryland
Posts: 2,316
Likes (Received): 1049

MADERA COUNTY SELECTED FOR HIGH-SPEED RAIL DROP-OFF POINT


Quote:
Madera County has been selected by the California High-Speed Rail Authority for a drop-off point.

The proposed high-speed rail stop would not be a full-service station just a stop where passengers could get off to catch a connecting Amtrak train.

A high-speed rail bridge over the Fresno River in Madera County continues to take shape.

Crews have been busy on the 25-foot high viaduct next to the Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroad tracks. Several columns are in place ready to support the 1500-foot bridge which should be finished this summer.

"It's a seed being planted and it's going to grow. That's what we want," District 4 Supervisor Max Rodriguez. "You can see the atmosphere of excitement here because they see things are going to happen."

The High-Speed Rail Authority has proposed the Amtrak station on Road 26 in Madera serve as a strategic stop. There, passengers would be able to get off a high-speed rail train for an Amtrak connection or vice-versa.

"I know that having an enhanced, vibrant, accessible modern transportation system coupled with increased job opportunity and housing choice help us attract and retain our young people," council member Will Oliver said.

City and council officials were all looking to the future. They believe the intermodal facility connecting high-speed rail and a commuter train would give Madera County a boost when it comes to economic development.

"It allows our residents to have new connections to educational institutions that they didn't have before, job opportunities elsewhere," District 1 Supervisor Brett Frazier said.

At this point, the Madera stop is the valley's only planned joint station connecting both high-speed rail and Amtrak.
http://abc30.com/news/madera-county-...point/1319186/
Anday no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 10th, 2016, 05:03 AM   #6336
Anday
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Maryland
Posts: 2,316
Likes (Received): 1049

City Of Houston Wants To Study Feasibility Of High-Speed Rail Terminal Downtown


Quote:
Would it make sense to have the proposed Texas high-speed rail line end in downtown Houston? Or should the final stop be further out?
Quote:
The city of Houston is requesting applications from companies to conduct a feasibility study on the proposed high-speed rail line between Houston and Dallas.

Council member Larry Green, who chairs the council’s transportation committee, said based on the study’s results the city wants to determine whether it makes sense for the rail to go to downtown, “and that we’ve made sure that the city has done its due diligence with regard to looking at all possibilities in making that happen.”

The company Texas Central Partners is developing the rail line project. Its current plan envisions the Houston station to be at the Northwest Mall on the corner of the 610 Loop and US-290.


https://www.houstonpublicmedia.org/a...inal-downtown/
Anday no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 10th, 2016, 05:04 AM   #6337
Anday
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Maryland
Posts: 2,316
Likes (Received): 1049

US bullet train plans, learning from California, favor private cash over public funds


Quote:
It took years of lawsuits and political battles for California to finally break ground last year on the nation’s first bullet train, which aims to connect San Francisco to Los Angeles by 2029.

High-speed rail advocates had hoped the line, supported by more than $13 billion in state and federal money, would inspire similar government-financed projects. Instead, its many delays have left rail groups wary of accepting public funds for projects they are proposing in three other states.

Companies in Texas, Minnesota and Nevada all plan to tap private cash from investors globally, with help from foreign train makers and governments eager to export train technology. The projects would rely on partnerships with Japanese or Chinese firms that face saturated train markets at home.

“The United States is the Holy Grail of deployment for Japan, China, France, Germany and Spain,” said Tim Keith, Texas Central CEO.

California’s example shows that taking taxpayer money opens the door to political and legal challenges that can drag out planning, bidding and approvals for years, private rail advocates said. Companies now see a quicker — even cheaper — path by largely avoiding such headaches.

“All the rules relating to public engagement start the day you take public funding,” said Wendy Meadley, chief strategy officer for North American High Speed Rail Group’s project in Minnesota. With private financing, she said, opponents “can’t make thousands of public records requests and run the project over.”

The company said last year it would seek money from Chinese investors. Now, it said it is considering two foreign partners for the $4.2 billion project, which seeks to connect the twin cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul to Rochester, Minnesota, by 2022.

Texas Central is paying for engineering studies with $75 million from Texas investors, $40 million from a state-backed Japanese development fund and about $130 million in design work from two firms. The Dallas-to-Houston rail line is projected to cost $12 billion and be completed by 2021.

In Nevada, privately financed XpressWest plans to link Las Vegas to Southern California. Started by Las Vegas developer Marnell Companies, the company formed a joint venture last fall with a consortium of Chinese firms, infusing $100 million into the project expected to break ground as soon as this year.

XpressWest officials declined to comment.
http://www.reviewjournal.com/news/na...r-public-funds
Anday no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 10th, 2016, 08:48 AM   #6338
FM 2258
Registered User
 
FM 2258's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Austin
Posts: 5,438
Likes (Received): 612

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anday View Post
City Of Houston Wants To Study Feasibility Of High-Speed Rail Terminal Downtown








https://www.houstonpublicmedia.org/a...inal-downtown/
If there could be a stop at IAH and downtown that would make a perfect city to airport link by default.
FM 2258 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 10th, 2016, 10:41 AM   #6339
jonasry
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Gävle
Posts: 312
Likes (Received): 147

Well, if they're spending billions on high-speed rail and want it to go downtown. Why not bring back the Houston Intermodal Transit Center that was cancelled in 2010?



__________________
jonasry no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 10th, 2016, 07:36 PM   #6340
Smooth Indian
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 812
Likes (Received): 241

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anday View Post
US bullet train plans, learning from California, favor private cash over public funds




http://www.reviewjournal.com/news/na...r-public-funds
California would have been tougher even for private parties. Land acquisition, environmental clearances, NIMBYs, special interests are not going to disappear if the funding is private. There were however overseas interests (chinese/japanese) who showed some interest in the funding. The other way to look at it is that private interests were simply not enthused because of the challenges facing CaHSR and hence the only a govt body (CHRSA) could endure so long. TCR and Xpresswest have fewer obstacles hence even though the respective state govts may not be so interested private parties can still hope to do it themselves.
__________________

zaphod, fskobic liked this post
Smooth Indian no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
amtrak, desertxpress, fly california, high speed rail, northeast corridor, texas triangle, united states

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:52 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium