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View Poll Results: Should the US build or improve it's HSR network?
Yes 249 89.57%
No 29 10.43%
Voters: 278. You may not vote on this poll

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Old May 14th, 2016, 05:03 AM   #6361
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anday View Post
Hyperloop Technologies becomes Hyperloop One, pulls in $80 million and announces global partners






http://techcrunch.com/2016/05/10/hyp...obal-partners/

http://www.treehugger.com/public-tra...ne-second.html
This is one of the most encouraging photo of the project. Like those private space program, they seem to do their PR well.

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Old May 15th, 2016, 02:40 PM   #6362
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Have any physicists or transport engineers ever positively critiqued this concept? I have not heard of anyone reviewing the white paper from Elon Musk exhaustively. But somehow a lot of young engineers and graduate students are attracted to it.
Alon Levy, a professional mathematician, has a couple of major critiques of it:

https://pedestrianobservations.wordp...-entrepreneur/

https://pedestrianobservations.wordp...perloop-costs/
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Old May 16th, 2016, 12:24 PM   #6363
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Originally Posted by 00Zy99 View Post
In what?

Hyperloop?

Texas HSR?

California?

The NEC?

Minnesota?
Apologies, Hyperloop. I can't find the link in my history for some reason, so can't vouch for the credibility of the article or website. I'm assuming SNCF is still fully focused on developing high speed rail to even faster speeds and anything else is for an even longer term vision. But I'm surprised they wouldn't look more at Maglev for that vision.
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Old May 19th, 2016, 06:38 AM   #6364
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Japanese bullet train operator opening office in Dallas to assist Texas high-speed rail

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The operator of a Japanese high-speed train line plans to open a Dallas office to support a local company’s plans for a controversial bullet train connecting North Texas and Houston.
The Dallas Regional Chamber announced Thursday afternoon that Central Japan Railway Co. will station about 20 employees in Dallas.
The company’s technical and operations experts will help privately-backed Texas Central Partners with the development of what could be America’s first high-speed rail line. Texas Central plans to use the same train and rail technology that Central Japan uses on its Tokaido Shinkansen line that connects Tokyo, Nagoya and Osaka.
“This new train service will drive continued economic growth across Texas, relieve congestion along Interstate 45, and connect our business community with the Houston market in a highly efficient manner,” Dallas chamber president and CEO Dale Petroskey said in a prepared statement.
Plans for a Dallas-Houston bullet train have drawn cheers from federal officials and the state’s two largest urban areas. But it’s fiercely opposed in the rural counties that sit between the two regions.
The Dallas station is planned to be near or atop Interstate 30, just south of downtown. That station and development around it are seen as a way to reconnect downtown to the burgeoning Cedars neighborhood.
North Texas leaders expect the line to dramatically increase the number of passengers on Dallas Area Rapid Transit’s light-rail system, whose four lines all converge downtown. That projected ridership increase is a driving force behind DART pushing for a second set of light-rail tracks downtown amid landowners’ assertions that any street-level route will negatively impact several current and planned developments in the city’s urban core.
Meanwhile, the high-speed train line’s southern terminus currently isn’t expected to reach downtown Houston. That city doesn’t have any local rail lines that reach a proposed Houston bullet train station. But city officials in recent weeks have begun exploring possible options for bringing the high-speed station into downtown.
Construction could begin as soon as next year.
“Having this office in Dallas will help ensure that the project will meet all milestones, partnering with Texans in a transformational project for our nation, our state and the region,” Texas Central CEO Tim Keith said in a written statement.
The railway company joins other Japan-based companies, including Toyota and Kubota, that have selected North Texas for U.S.-based operations.
“As we build on our recent successes in economic development, we will focus on ways to raise our international profile even further and to create new business opportunities that will benefit the entire Dallas regional economy for generations to come,” said Petroskey.
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Old May 19th, 2016, 03:45 PM   #6365
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California High-speed rail gets a four-year delay

http://www.politico.com/agenda/story...r-delay-000123

The first segment of California’s first-in-the-nation bullet-train project, currently scheduled for completion in 2018, will not be done until the end of 2022, according to a contract revision the Obama administration quietly approved this morning. That initial 119-mile segment through the relatively flat and empty Central Valley was considered the easiest-to-build stretch of a planned $64 billion line, which is eventually supposed to zip passengers between San Francisco and Los Angeles in under three hours. So the four-year delay is sure to spark new doubts about whether the state’s—and perhaps the nation’s—most controversial and expensive infrastructure project will ever reach its destination.
......

Federal Railroad Administration officials assigned much of the blame for the lags to the project’s vociferous critics, who have tied it up with a tangle of lawsuits, administrative challenges, and other red tape. They complained that the opponents, especially Central Valley farmers and other not-in-my-back-yard landowners, have gotten far more traction against the railway than they would have against a highway, reflecting a cultural and political bias in favor of traditional asphalt infrastructure. But while they described today’s agreement as a routine bureaucratic clarification, they said they expect an explosive reaction from opponents looking to score political points in Sacramento and Washington.
.......

Concerns about the project’s viability, however, extend well beyond NIMBY-ism and car-bias. The estimated price tag is now equivalent to 35 times the annual federal subsidy for Amtrak. The state’s voters approved $9 billion in bonds for high-speed rail, and Brown has diverted some revenue from California’s carbon trading program to the project, but Republicans shut off the federal spigot when they took back the House of Representatives in 2010. So while Morales says there’s enough money to extend the railway north to San Jose, there’s not yet a long-term funding source to finish the entire job. There is some optimism that private firms can help finance construction in anticipation of profits from running the line, but there is also widespread skepticism about the state’s rosy ridership forecasts.
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Old May 19th, 2016, 03:47 PM   #6366
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Salif View Post
Apologies, Hyperloop. I can't find the link in my history for some reason, so can't vouch for the credibility of the article or website. I'm assuming SNCF is still fully focused on developing high speed rail to even faster speeds and anything else is for an even longer term vision. But I'm surprised they wouldn't look more at Maglev for that vision.
If the costs are not much higher than conventional HSR with dedicated ROW, USA might consider experiment with Hyperloop.

Last edited by mrsmartman; May 19th, 2016 at 05:59 PM.
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Old May 19th, 2016, 04:23 PM   #6367
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35 times Amtrak's annual subsidy is still just a drop in the bucket.
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Old May 24th, 2016, 10:50 AM   #6368
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Texas high speed rail is ready to use eminent domain.

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In the four years Texas Central Railway unveiled plans to link Dallas and Houston with the country's first bullet train, officials with the private company have talked a lot about how quickly the line will whisk travelers between two of the country's largest, fastest-growing urban areas, about how darn Texan the early investors are, about the stellar safety record of the Japanese rail technology they'll be using.

By contrast, the company has talked very little about its planned use of eminent domain, which is the legal term for when a government, or frequently a private company that has the government's endorsement, takes someone's land. When the topic has come up, the company has typically responded by stressing its strong preference for negotiating with landowners to find a mutually agreeable price for their land.
The problem with that response is that it fails to acknowledge some fundamental truths about human beings in general and landowners in the rural areas along the bullet train's proposed route in particular. People, as a rule, don't like having their property sliced in two by large infrastructure projects. People in places like Ellis and Grimes counties really, really don't like having their property sliced in two by a private, Japanese-backed venture whose only benefit for them will be the privilege of marveling at the wondrous bullet-train technology as it zooms by atop a 14-foot berm. If the line is ever going to get built, Texas Central will have to use eminent domain against hundreds, maybe thousands, of landowners.
Texas Central now admits as much. In filings last month with the federal Surface Transportation Board, which regulates the operations of the freight and passenger rail market, the company indicated that it's ready to start acquiring right-of-way for its track.


"In many cases, that involves negotiating agreements with landowners who are willing sellers," the company wrote. "Texas Central is already beginning those negotiations. Inevitably, however, some landowners along the route will not be willing to sell, or even negotiate. If some of those negotiations reach an impasse, Texas Central plans to use its statutory eminent domain powers to establish the properties' condemnation value."
In the weeks since the filling, the Surface Transportation Board has become the site of a pitched battle between Texas Central and its opponents, with powerful surrogates on both sides. Several members of Texas' congressional delegation, and about a dozen state legislators, have waded into the debate. Congressmen Joe Barton of Ennis and Kevin Brady of suburban Houston have filed letters opposing Texas Central while Dallas' Eddie Bernice Johnson and Corpus Christi's Blake Farenthold offering statements of support.
The stakes are high. Texas Central says it needs Surface Transportation Board approval in order to begin using eminent domain under Texas law, an obvious prerequisite for actually building and operating a railroad.That means the Surface Transportation Board represents a regulatory choke point, a rare point where opponents can conceivably derail the project in one fell swoop.


The fight is coming to a head quickly, because Texas Central is in a tremendous hurry. It plans to begin construction next year, with service projected to begin in late 2021. To meet those goals, and to meet timelines agreed to by the company's private backers, Texas Central needs to begin acquiring property "as soon as possible." Which is why, in addition to asking the Surface Transportation Board for authority to construct an operate a railroad, it's also asking for the body's permission to begin eminent domain proceedings — to begin acting like a real, live railroad — well before it is officially designated as a railroad.
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Old May 25th, 2016, 12:48 AM   #6369
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Let's get it done!
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Old May 26th, 2016, 02:13 PM   #6370
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I think that only reasonable route is Boston-Washington.
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Old May 26th, 2016, 04:37 PM   #6371
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I think that only reasonable route is Boston-Washington.
Tell that to Texas, California, Florida, Nevada, and the Midwest.
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Old May 27th, 2016, 02:26 AM   #6372
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I think that only reasonable route is Boston-Washington.
There are reasonable routes in all regions of the USA. It is also reasonable to have lines linking these different regions together. The way I see The interstate highways along the coasts and some other key interstate highways connecting the coasts to the midwest, southeast and southwest regions can be gradually paralleled by HSR lines over the next 2-3 decades.
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Old May 27th, 2016, 10:00 PM   #6373
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True, the roads are getting ridiculously broad (and thus gradually less efficient) at many points in the US, so having a good alternative would be in everyone's interest.
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Old May 29th, 2016, 07:04 AM   #6374
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http://www.corsicanadailysun.com/new...251e1eb61.html
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Old May 29th, 2016, 07:49 AM   #6375
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Thanks for the article. For some reason I expect this line to be on mostly bridges like they do in China. That should ensure the least amount of disruption to the land.
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Old May 29th, 2016, 10:08 AM   #6376
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why should they build it on bridges? That would make the whole thing just prohibitively expensive. The route will be mostly on flat land with insignificant population density. Ideal to keep the cost/km down.
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Old May 29th, 2016, 12:54 PM   #6377
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why should they build it on bridges? That would make the whole thing just prohibitively expensive. The route will be mostly on flat land with insignificant population density. Ideal to keep the cost/km down.
I believe FM 2258 is talking about viaducts in which they probably would since it would eliminate at level crossing which is a fundamental requirement for true HSR.
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Old May 29th, 2016, 01:09 PM   #6378
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I believe most of it will be on berms, where possible...
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Old May 30th, 2016, 04:59 PM   #6379
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In the long term it should cover Houston-New York
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Old May 31st, 2016, 10:09 PM   #6380
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why should they build it on bridges? That would make the whole thing just prohibitively expensive. The route will be mostly on flat land with insignificant population density. Ideal to keep the cost/km down.
It depends on what kind of geography (both topographical, social, and political) the railway is cutting through. Elevating the railway line does increase base construction costs, but given that the railway is cutting through many conservative rural communities that are afraid that the train will bisect townships and neighborhoods, elevating the tracks helps offset those costs by leaving them in place.
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