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View Poll Results: Should the US build or improve it's HSR network?
Yes 249 89.57%
No 29 10.43%
Voters: 278. You may not vote on this poll

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Old February 4th, 2010, 12:31 PM   #1221
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
You have a point on regulatory constrained urban housing supply. However, in other places where pro-suburban development never got the same traction and extent they've got in US, suburban housing, far from central locations, are usually less expensive per area unit.
Which shows that there is demand is higher to closer you get to a central location.

I'm househunting in Switzerland at the moment, and it is striking how much cheaper houses become once you are no longer at walking distance from a train station. A clear indicator of the value people put on good pubic transit...
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Old February 4th, 2010, 02:23 PM   #1222
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Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
However, the bottom line is that a transportation system should be planned for the "average" guy.
I had a response but I've withdrawn it.

In place I'm just going to yawn.

Last edited by makita09; February 4th, 2010 at 02:34 PM.
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Old February 6th, 2010, 01:37 AM   #1223
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I think we should put some thread about these kinds of debates somewhere in the forum because they really are taking over the topic. I want to read more about potential developments (after all, some if not enough money was promised to at least bring the fundamentals recently) of the planned HSR networks but instead we dither on ideological issues that theoretically can apply anywhere on this forum.
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Old February 6th, 2010, 04:37 AM   #1224
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totally agree, this has gone on for far too many pages. I think everyone's viewpoint has been made already.
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Old February 10th, 2010, 09:23 PM   #1225
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USPIRG synopsis of Rail Plan

Below you will find a link to a synopsis of the new US Rail plan. It by far, the most informed and accurate summation of the US rail plan. Disregard any of the quick news headline stories that have appeared elswhere and are nothing more than regurgitated, uniformed and unefforted reports.

This documents breaks down plans by region; bothers to delineate the difference between HSR & Intercity rail and itemizes long vs. short range plans. Any one who wants to have a semi informed opinion of the passenger rail topic should at least read this document.

http://cdn.publicinterestnetwork.org...-Track-vUS.pdf

And the main website;
http://www.uspirg.org/home/reports/r...em-for-america

Last edited by jpIllInoIs; February 10th, 2010 at 09:28 PM.
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Old February 13th, 2010, 12:07 AM   #1226
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Finally, main stream media starts paying attention at HSR.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/13/bu...agewanted=1&hp
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Old February 13th, 2010, 04:04 AM   #1227
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We just wait several years, then the plan come ture. HSR is a new technical revelation in Europe & E.Asia, I don't know it wether or not fit for the auto and air country like U.S., people change their travel behavior are needed.
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Old February 13th, 2010, 06:35 AM   #1228
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very nice to see US has a good plan of highspeed trains.
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Old February 13th, 2010, 09:01 PM   #1229
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wayneyoung View Post
We just wait several years, then the plan come ture. HSR is a new technical revelation in Europe & E.Asia, I don't know it wether or not fit for the auto and air country like U.S., people change their travel behavior are needed.
I'm not quite sure that's how it works. Here in France where I live (and I would like to repeat the point that, no, I'm not French....) absoLUTEly nobody travelled by train between Paris and Lyon in the 1970s. Then the government invested large sums of money in a highspeed track between those two cities, and suddenly EVERYBODY travelled by train.

Young Wayne, it's a little bit too glib for my taste to speak of people "changing their travel behaviour if needed". Sometimes individuals react to centrally created inducements. - And, sometimes, are happy foreever after. The government is not always good, but it's sometimes a positive factor.
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Old February 14th, 2010, 05:36 AM   #1230
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This found in news today:
http://www.burbankleader.com/article...rail021310.txt

Quote:
High-speed rail system: Leaders mull benefits, fears

Federal grant makes project more likely to happen, they say.
By Zain Shauk
Published: Last Updated Friday, February 12, 2010 10:07 PM PST
I see several good points within.

Quote:
...but city officials say they are leery of the potential impacts.

Existing rail corridors would have to be expanded, cutting into surrounding properties and infrastructure; raised tracks would have to be built to avoid clashing with road crossings; Glendale’s historic train station would have to be moved to accommodate a closer railroad right-of-way; Bob Hope Airport could be isolated from the line; and Burbank’s Metrolink station could be relocated, altering city plans crafted around the current site.

At the same time, the benefits of the plan could be extensive for the region, including tens of thousands of new jobs associated with the system’s construction. The proposed 800-mile project would be capable of whisking passengers from Los Angeles to San Francisco in 2 hours and 38 minutes, according to the California High Speed Rail Authority. A station planned for Burbank could also attract new businesses and commuter residents, officials and economists say.
Quote:
Still, concerns about high-speed trains are already presenting an array of difficult considerations for local authorities, even before rail representatives have completed a draft report on possible options for the area.

Increased traffic congestion and construction to accommodate the new rail system could dramatically affect surrounding property, infrastructure and communities, city officials say.
Quote:
That would create problems with existing traffic infrastructure that abuts the route, as well as surrounding properties, proposed developments, planned freeway expansion and Glendale’s historic Amtrak/Metrolink station.

When Glendale City Council members raised concerns about the potential demolition of the commuter station, built in a Spanish colonial revival style in 1923, authority representatives responded with a possible compromise.

“You won’t lose that,” said Steven Ortmann, station planning manager for the authority. “Just move it.”
Quote:
Airport disconnection

And despite an emphasis on connecting commuters to high-speed public transit, the trains would zip past Bob Hope Airport, leaving it isolated from riders who might want to use the rail line to travel from other parts of California and catch flights.

Area leaders and stakeholders have frequently raised concerns about that aspect of the proposed path, asking that it instead be diverted from the San Fernando Road corridor to connect with the airport, but rail representatives have contended the detour would slow the system down.

The high-speed line could accommodate a light-rail-based connection to the airport, but the authority would not fund or develop the link, which could cost between $200 million and $400 million, depending on the location of the stop, said Dan Feger, executive director of the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority.

A connection to the airport could not only help with increasing its accessibility, but also offer rail passengers options for rental car, taxi, bus and light rail services as part of a proposed $100-million regional transportation center at Bob Hope Airport, Feger said.

“It provides a whole suite of options of ‘What do you do once you get off the high-speed rail,’ which they’re not thinking about,” he said.
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Old February 14th, 2010, 05:38 AM   #1231
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Something in my mind apart from the article is that to make room for HSR in a developed area is that something someone owns somewhere is going to have to be bulldozed out of the way.

Who is willing to lose their stuff?
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Old February 14th, 2010, 07:34 AM   #1232
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*sigh* Short sightetness of congestion this and that. That is why we need to change the way we develop the country to an urban village instead of suburb upon suburb. That way, congestion can be managed by walkable living areas.
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Old February 14th, 2010, 08:12 PM   #1233
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100% agreed. Some suburbs in Seattle area are in process to become urban villages as well. That is good thing. I hope more US cities will follow that.
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Old February 15th, 2010, 08:31 PM   #1234
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Quote:
Originally Posted by G5man View Post
That way, congestion can be managed by walkable living areas.
Amen to that
A couple years ago moved to small town after decades in major metropolitan area.
Bit of an adjustment, but I like much better.
Feel healthier too. And something kind of like "less compressed". Can't define why, but I just do.
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Old February 15th, 2010, 10:46 PM   #1235
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Quote:
Originally Posted by G5man View Post
*sigh* Short sightetness of congestion this and that. That is why we need to change the way we develop the country to an urban village instead of suburb upon suburb. That way, congestion can be managed by walkable living areas.
I think people will be happier for it aswell. Sometimes taking the air outside really is good, even on a very hot day!
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Old February 16th, 2010, 09:53 AM   #1236
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Some people will like villages, others will like exurbs. Let the market provide housing for everyone's taste.
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Old February 16th, 2010, 10:51 AM   #1237
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southwestforests View Post
Something in my mind apart from the article is that to make room for HSR in a developed area is that something someone owns somewhere is going to have to be bulldozed out of the way.

Who is willing to lose their stuff?
Hence the reason why any new Shinkansen systems are built deep (40m+) underground in urban areas
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Old February 16th, 2010, 07:18 PM   #1238
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Hence the reason why any new Shinkansen systems are built deep (40m+) underground in urban areas
Not only that. Legally speaking the land can be compulsory purchased, but paying for such large areas at market prices adds up, and coupled with the political pressure, it is easier and perhaps faster to use expensive underground methods.
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Old February 16th, 2010, 10:02 PM   #1239
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Quote:
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Some people will like villages, others will like exurbs. Let the market provide housing for everyone's taste.
As long as living in the middle of nowhere is not subsidized indirectly or directly and as long as zoning laws are not biased towards them. I can live with that. Soaring energy costs of the near future will do their job. (once the economic crises is over again)
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Old February 17th, 2010, 05:53 PM   #1240
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ternarydaemon View Post
Not only that. Legally speaking the land can be compulsory purchased, but paying for such large areas at market prices adds up, and coupled with the political pressure, it is easier and perhaps faster to use expensive underground methods.
Even so, it may still be better to exercise eminent domain because if construction occurs under private property, whoever is doing the construction must still purchase or negotiate an easement through the property. Hence why most underground construction is under roads since they are public property.
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