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Old February 17th, 2011, 10:24 AM   #121
Ashis Mitra
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Sydney has both under ground train & underground tram, both in past & present.
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Old March 2nd, 2011, 11:45 PM   #122
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COMBINATION OF OLD & NEW SYSTEM

Current route uses former Railway Square route from Central Station & Capital Square, then touches former Pyrmont terminus near John Street Square, then crosses former Rozelle route at Fish market, crosses former Glebe Point route at Glebe, the former Rozelle route at Rozelle Bay and finally touches former Lily field route at Lily field. So both Central Station & Lily field has served by old & new network, although there is some distance between old & new Lily field terminus.

The proposed extension of route 1 (current route) to Dulwich Hill Station will cross former Leichhardt route near Leichhardt North, former Haberfield route at Marion, and former Earl stone Park route at Dulwich Grove.

The proposed new route 2 to Circular Quay will touch former Railway Square route at Capitol Square, will run via former Erskine Street terminus, will pass under Harbor Bridge which has previously tram tracks on right side same like left side rail tracks and a very small part of former Circular Quay Route near Circular Quay. So Circular Quay will be again an important tram terminus.

The proposed new route 3 to Rand wick Racecourse will use former Rand wick Route from Football Stadium & Rand wick Racecourse. So Rand wick Racecourse will also be again an important tram terminus.

The proposed new route 4 to Ash field will touch former Summer hill Station terminus and Ash filed Station terminus. Ash field tram terminus was formerly not touched with the main city tram network.

How history repeats!!!

1) Current route crosses Victoria Road, Glebe Point Road and The Crescent of former network.
2) Route 1 extension will cross Norton Street, Marion Street and New Canterbury Road of former network. All these streets mentioned here served by tram before 1961.
3) New Route 2 to Circular Quay will use a very small part of Hick son Street and Alfred Street which carried formerly tram.
4) New Route 3 to Rand wick Racecourse will use Anzac Parade following former Rand wick route.

So Leichhardt, Lewis ham, Anzac Parade, Town hall, etc. will be served again by tram around next few years!!! Ooooh, I just can’t imagine.



Rozelle depot is still present and holds some old vandalized R class trams. Is it truly impossible to repair these and start a heritage tram service?


Former tram track on Glebe Point Road.



Former tram alignment in Bal moral.



Central Station terminus was also a very important terminus of old tram network. Trams then also climbed up the colonnade, but just on opposite direction.
Here we look a sign 'To Pitt & George Street'. What this means? I think it is a sign of former tram network (closed in sixties). Am I right?

Last edited by Ashis Mitra; March 3rd, 2011 at 12:01 AM.
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Old March 4th, 2011, 11:48 PM   #123
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Current Lily field tram terminus. Lily field was also served by tram previously, but the old terminus was almost 1 Km. Away from new.



Sydney tram map in 1947.

Last edited by Ashis Mitra; March 5th, 2011 at 12:41 AM.
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Old March 13th, 2011, 03:43 PM   #124
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Former tram at Sydenham rail station in 1954.


That area of Sydenham Station as today. Any time you travel along a road that has bitumen in the middle of the road and concrete at the sides, it's probably an old tram route, just like this photo. It's everywhere in Sydney's inner suburbs.


Here a single tram track runs up one side of a narrow suburban street. The tram went around the block in a loop. The track has been replaced by concrete but the curve is still quite clear. It's just off Crystal Street, Peter sham.


There used to be a large tram waiting shed at Railway Square, which is seen on the former photo, but nothing remains. It has been replaced by a weird structure that lets in the rain and the wind but looks extremely modern. The original tram shed has been lovingly re-erected at the Loft us Tram Museum.


This picture, with rails clearly showing was taken in Zetland near the Moore Park Supa Centre. There is just a single track right down the middle of the road. It was not a regular tram route, but linked two depots together, and allowed trams from the inner western suburbs to bring people over and back for the Rand wick Races, the Cricket and the Royal Easter Show.


Have lock Avenue at South Coo gee passes under Brook Street.
This dates from 1901 and was originally "trams only".


This bridge over peaceful Bar com Avenue in Darling hurst originally carried trams from 1916 to 1954. This tram route was called the Bellevue Hill line, and it ran through Padding ton to Bondi via Bellevue Hill. The footway on this side of the bridge is still known as the Cutler Footway. Today, the 389 bus follows much of the tram route including this bridge.


Trams ran down to Coo gee, Clovelly, Bronte and Bondi beaches. It was essential to select a gentle route that was not too steep for the packed trams to climb at the end of a day at the beach. Railway-style construction was often used in building the Sydney tram network, with cuttings through solid rock. The most famous of all is at Bronte where the tram descended to a terminus right at the beach and next to a large picnic park.


Here the bus makes a right turn, whilst the trams used to enter their own cutting for a gentle descent to Coo gee Beach. The location is at the corner of St Paul Street and Dudley Street, just down the hill from The Spot.


This is Eddy Avenue, just below Central rail station & tram terminus. Formerly trams run on this road, and another route was terminated on the above colonnade. New trams are now starting using this colonnade. Here you can see some rosettes.


Large waiting sheds were erected at many tram stops, especially where there might be a crowd of shoppers or a lot of people after a sporting event. These waiting sheds are now very rare and are items of major heritage value. They were built for trams not buses. This one is on Bondi Road near Waverley Park.
Notice the little window, so people seated on the bench inside can see if their tram is coming. In modern bus shelters, this view is blocked by an advertisement.


Gurner Street at Cascade Street, Padding ton this short piece of road was once a pair of tram tracks reserved for trams. Now there is a bus stop for the 389 bus. Around 1914, several terrace houses were demolished to build the tram tracks round a tight corner and into Hargrave Street. The house in the background is a modern replacement. Originally the trams went straight across and veered right to reach Hargrave Street.


Previously, this was Waverley Tram Depot. Trams entered and left the depot by a pair of tracks which were close against the York Road fence. The office building and the Tramways Institute building (meal rooms, staff amenities etc), both near Oxford Street, have been demolished.

Really Sydney has done a great job to construct many underground suburban rail lines, which are still a dream for us Indians.
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Old March 21st, 2011, 12:08 AM   #125
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Who will believe that this is the former place of Oceania's largest tram depot Dowling street tram depot?
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Old March 21st, 2011, 12:09 AM   #126
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Old March 31st, 2011, 07:56 PM   #127
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Please try to answer these -
1) What is the target year of extending current line to Dulwich Hill opening new routes to Circular Quay, Ashfield & Rand wick Racecourse?
2) Reserved or unreserved, - which type of track layout is common in Sydney tramway network?
3) Which is the busiest tram terminus?
4) Which termini have interchange facility with suburban rail network?
5) Where is/are the depot(s) of the tramway network?
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Old April 1st, 2011, 09:44 AM   #128
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashis Mitra View Post
Please try to answer these -
1) What is the target year of extending current line to Dulwich Hill opening new routes to Circular Quay, Ashfield & Rand wick Racecourse?
2) Reserved or unreserved, - which type of track layout is common in Sydney tramway network?
3) Which is the busiest tram terminus?
4) Which termini have interchange facility with suburban rail network?
5) Where is/are the depot(s) of the tramway network?
1) The new line will be finished in 2012.
2) Reserved.
3) Most likely Central Station.
4) At the moment, only Central Station. But when the line is extended to Dulwich Hill, there will be interchanges with the suburban rail network at Lewisham and Dulwich Hill.
5) There is a depot in Pyrmont.
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Old April 1st, 2011, 11:21 PM   #129
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Yes, I heartly support to returning tram in Sydney, and I have full support also to Sydney Metro. Such a big city should have a good network of tram, metro & train.
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Old April 2nd, 2011, 03:17 AM   #130
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I wish you were our Premier then *sigh*
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Old June 11th, 2011, 05:18 AM   #131
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Trains running a decade late Jacob Saulwick
June 11, 2011
.A 10-year-old rail report still remains the benchmark, says Jacob Saulwick.

Ten years ago, the NSW Co-ordinator General of Rail, Ron Christie, presented his transport minister with a long document explaining what needed to happen to Sydney's rail system. Its contents were explicit.

The report was for the eyes of Carl Scully and the Bob Carr cabinet, and not meant to be released to the public. (In the way of these things, it ended up all over the Herald less than a year later.)

Fresh from the successful operation of rail transport during the 2000 Olympics, Christie and his planning team warned against letting the longer-term neglect of the train system go unchecked.

Advertisement: Story continues below The report lamented a lack of maintenance spending which had degraded service quality. It said the old trick of introducing double-decked trains to cram more passengers onto the tracks had been exhausted. ''The system is rapidly approaching gridlock,'' Christie asserted in 2001. ''This is already manifest in the extreme day-to-day sensitivity of CityRail services to even the most minor of disruptive incidents.''

Without substantial investment, the report argued, rail lines would start to choke by 2011. Even with that investment program, 2011 marked the date a state government needed to begin building another line across Sydney Harbour and through the central business district.

While the report was heavy on warnings, its flipside was ambition. The future of Sydney's rail network could be secured, if its constraints were tackled systematically.

Ten years on, and in the wake of a second Christie report, prepared last year for the Herald, what has been done to improve CityRail, or at least ensure services have not gone backwards? What has been neglected? And how will new Transport Minister Gladys Berejiklian tackle the situation?

Where are we now?

When Christie talked about gridlock on Sydney's train system, he was not talking about the morning crush familiar to commuters. Rather, Sydney's tracks themselves were becoming overcrowded.

Unlike the bumper-to-bumper snarls on the roads, track congestion was not visible. But trains need to keep a safe distance from each other and it was fast becoming impossible to accommodate more services. ''This problem reflects the fact that, in the last 50 years, there have been almost no track amplifications - the equivalent of road widenings to provide extra traffic lanes - on the metropolitan network,'' the report said.

The remedy was to start immediately on several small but important improvements to pinchpoints in the existing network. These should take precedence over larger, and more politically impressive, rail extensions to new areas.

The improvements would provide more tracks to serve as overtaking lanes, allowing express services to pass all-stations services, and allow more space for trains to turn round without disrupting other services. Train maintenance and cleaning would be nearer to the city.

The measures were not formally adopted as policy in 2001. But three years later, under Michael Costa as transport minister, they were picked up and given a new name - Clearways - to cement the road analogy.

Whatever reliability the system displays in 2011 owes much to the fact that about half the projects recommended by Christie have been completed.

There are now more tracks to Cronulla. At Bondi Junction, Revesby, Hornsby, Lidcombe and Homebush, trains have more room to turn round. At Macdonaldtown, there is a new stabling yard. And a whole train line - from Epping to Chatswood - has been built.

But much of Christie's agenda is unfulfilled.

One crucial project - more tracks between Sydenham and Erskineville - has been quietly put to one side. A project to add tracks between Chatswood and St Leonards has also been mothballed.

There has been no duplication of the Illawarra Line at Mortdale, no turnback at Macarthur, no upgrade to Erskineville Junction, no flyover at Wolli Creek, no upgrade at Town Hall, no new stations at the University of Western Sydney, or Georges River.

The Christie report depicted these projects as necessary adjustments to help the city tread water just until 2011, by which time a growing population would demand major new rail capacity.

''Between about 2011 and about 2015, the relief provided by these corridor-based enhancements will be effectively exhausted and a new rail route through the inner city and the CBD, between Eveleigh and St Leonards, will be essential,'' Christie wrote. The new transport minister has promised extra train lines extending to the city's southwest and northwest. But she has not explained how she will fit the new services onto the crowded network.

Where will trains fit?

This week, one of the consultants who helped Christie prepare his 2001 report, Sandy Thomas, wrote an appraisal of the new government's progress for the industry journal Rail Express.

''If there's one single factor, above all others, that's blighted attempts to extend and improve Sydney's passenger rail network over the last 10 to 15 years, it's been the repeated tendency to rush in and 'do the engineering' before properly thinking through what's required,'' Thomas wrote.

His concern is with the government's plan for the North West Rail Link, the 23-kilometre line from Epping to Rouse Hill.

Tender documents show the government has locked in behind a route that would force all trains from the North West into the City via Epping and Chatswood, rather than allowing some trains to travel to the CBD via Epping and Strathfield.

On RailCorp's own numbers, it will struggle to accommodate new services from the north west onto the north shore and through the city.

Thomas foresees this scenario for north-west trains: ''Along with any new Epping-Chatswood train services catering for the forecast rapid growth in demand from the Central Coast, they will have to stop and turn back once they reach Chatswood, disgorging their passengers well short of North Sydney and the CBD and leaving them to squeeze onto a probably reduced number of already crowded trains from the North Shore suburbs.

''The design will now quite likely dictate the services - and without a second harbour crossing, they could well be very much poorer than the politicians and the public have been led to believe,'' he wrote.

Berejiklian has not explained why this won't be the case.

What about the CBD?

A good part of the reason the previous Labor government lost its way on rail planning was its infatuation with metros. The twin appeals of the North West Metro and then the more modest CBD Metro was that they could be built independently of RailCorp, and that they obviated the need for a second harbour crossing.

But the new government has staked its transport credentials on improving the CityRail system. According to the Christie report, the biggest bottleneck to improving CityRail is the lack of another route through the city.

''This project is regarded as being of the highest priority. Without it, the metropolitan rail system will face strangulation and progressive operational collapse - and the solutions … will all have very long lead times,'' the report said.

That was the prognosis a decade ago. It has become more pronounced. O'Farrell and Berejiklian have not explained how they will deal with it.

The Christie report has never been adopted wholesale by any government. But in putting forward a clear path for improving Sydney's rail system, it remains compelling reading.

''Ten years on it is not meant to be taken literally, because things have changed, but it is an excellent place to formulate the right plans and process to building the correct long-term transport plan for Sydney which is much needed,'' says John Lee, a former director general of Transport in NSW and current head of the industry group Tourism and Transport Forum.

In the absence of any alternative plan for Sydney's rail system, the report is a sharp reminder of what might have been and what may yet be.


Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/trains-run...#ixzz1Ovhoijb9
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Old September 12th, 2011, 10:46 AM   #132
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Drilling along the route of the North West Rail Link began today in Castle Hill

Rhys Haynes
From: The Daily Telegraph
September 07, 2011 10:01AM
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GEOTECHNICAL drilling along the route of the North West Rail Link began today in Castle Hil,l a day after more than $300 million was allocated to the project this year.

NSW Premier Barry O'Farrell, Transport Minister Gladys Berejiklian and Treasurer Mike Baird were on site today as drilling work began at Old Northern Road above what will be the new Castle Hill train station.

The work will help determine the exact underground conditions for construction for Australia's longest rail tunnels.

The 2011-12 budget yesterday allocated $314 million to the project with a provisional allocation of $2.5 billion over four years.

"The budget delivers on our commitment to the people of the north west and greater Sydney to build this long overdue rail link,'' Mr O'Farrell said.

Ms Berejiklian said the start of drilling along the 23-kilometre route was a significant milestone.

"This is an important part of the design work currently underway for the project and will help produce a very detailed picture of what the tunnelling contractors will encounter as they build the tunnels,'' Ms Berjiklian said.

There will be 150 boreholes with a diameter of 15 centimetres drilled at various locations along the proposed route between Rouse Hill and Epping. They will be drilled of up to depths of 75 metres.
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Old September 12th, 2011, 10:54 AM   #133
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Some propaganda to go with that...

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Old September 12th, 2011, 10:59 AM   #134
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Old October 6th, 2011, 02:26 AM   #135
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Paris-style train plan for city
Jacob Saulwick
October 6, 2011

RAIL services on the north shore, inner west, Bankstown, Hurstville and north west lines would operate as single-deck, high-frequency metros under a plan being drawn up by Transport NSW.

The plan would convert about a third of the CityRail network to metro-style trains such as in Paris or London. They would have far fewer seats than they have now but offer greater frequency.

An assessment by Transport NSW of Sydney's long-term rail strategy, obtained by the Herald, reveals that seven options are being prepared as part of the state's next transport masterplan, due next year.

But planners are pushing a so-called three-tier strategy, which would replace large tracts of the rail network with high-frequency metro trains.

The proposal argues that more modern rolling stock and signalling equipment would allow up to 28 trains an hour to cross the Harbour Bridge, avoiding the need for an expensive second crossing on what is the rail network's main choking point.

At present, 20 trains an hour can cross the bridge. Eighteen trains an hour already cross it during the morning peak, meaning it is approaching capacity.

The document, Long Term Rail Strategy Phase 5 Assessment, marked ''cabinet in confidence'' and dated August 2011, also reveals that:

rail planners expect that so much money and expertise will be tied up building the north-west rail link until about 2019 that another big project is not considered possible until then;

the Epping to Parramatta line is being planned as a shuttle between the two stations but is not expected to operate until 2036;

if the government does not build extra capacity through the city, or deliver a significant upgrade to rail technology, it would ensure the perverse result that services would need to be cut because passengers would take so long to disembark from carriages.

Shifting to a metro-style network would be expensive - and intensely controversial. On the plans obtained by the Herald, commuters travelling to the city from Rouse Hill and Cabramatta would most likely need to stand.

The assessment does not specify how much extra capacity would be added on the bridge if 20 double-decked trains were replaced by 18 single-decked trains. And it does not reveal how much it would cost to upgrade the signalling and rolling stock needed for the conversion to metros.

But the report suggests the government faces a choice between two ''service philosophies'' - suburban and three-tier or some sort of hybrid - in deciding on a future for the network.

The present suburban system offers double-decked trains with lots of seats, which means they are preferred for longer trips. But the heavier and faster suburban trains need to run with at least three-minute gaps between them, limiting them to 20 services an hour.

The ''three-tier'' philosophy would add metro trains to the present ''two-tier'' mix of suburban trains and express services from outer areas such as Newcastle, the south coast and the Blue Mountains.

The metro trains would run over the bridge. But to facilitate the shift, the report says a ''relief'' line would be needed between Redfern and Wynyard to allow non-metro trains from the west into the city.

The Keneally government promised to build this line but never explained that the reason for it was in part to enable the ''three-tier'' network.

The main alternative to shifting to metros is to build another harbour crossing for the existing network, as promised by Labor in 2005.

Through a spokesman, the Transport Minister, Gladys Berejiklian, said the government would consult industry and the community to develop a masterplan.

The report says that the consultant MTR, which operates the train network in Melbourne, will review work by other consultants on Sydney's future rail needs.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/parisstyle...#ixzz1ZuhieQ24
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Old October 6th, 2011, 02:27 AM   #136
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Commuters kept in the dark for too long
Jacob Saulwick
October 6, 2011

FOR commuters, the attraction of metros is that they come frequently. For governments the attraction of metros is that they are easy to run. And because they are typically built as stand-alone lines, governments are also attracted to the idea of bypassing RailCorp and the unions and maybe even privatising the lines or contracting them out.

Plans for the conversion of part of the CityRail network from suburban to metro-style operations began well before Barry O'Farrell and his Transport Minister, Gladys Berejiklian, came to office. But if O'Farrell and Berejiklian approve the concepts being drawn up inside Transport NSW, and they have given no indication yet they even agree with them, they will be signing off on something more radical and risky than their bumbling predecessors ever managed.

The then premier, Morris Iemma, signalled his enthusiasm for metros in 2006, only a year after Bob Carr announced the expansion of the heavy rail network to the north-west and south-west, connected by another harbour crossing.

By March 2008, Iemma was scrapping plans for the north-west link and the second harbour crossing, replacing them (as concepts at least) with the vision of a new ''euro-style'' metro to the north-west.

By the end of that year the north-west concept had been winnowed back to a CBD metro and by 2010, the CBD metro was dead as well.

But inside the bureaucracy, and within consultancies, some transport planners remained as keen as ever to shift Sydney transport away from its focus on RailCorp-controlled heavy rail and on to what is seen as a more modern form of transport.

In December 2008 the transport consultant MTR, which runs Hong Kong's metro system, told the state it should think about moving to a single-deck, high-frequency operation.

In 2009 a former chief executive of State Rail, Simon Lane, signed off on a report to the government advocating the conversion of inner-city parts of the rail network to metro-style operations by 2040.

And from then on, work continued inside Transport NSW on how to make this happen. The key difference with earlier proposals, however, is rather than build new metro lines to complement Sydney's network, metro trains would take the place of parts of it. Those plans have continued apace under the Coalition.

There are some people who will love the idea of converting part of the CityRail network to metros. And there are people who will say it just will not work.

Among those are the planners who prepared the Herald's Independent Transport Inquiry, who argued in favour of expanding the heavy rail network and in the long term complementing it with independent metro lines.

But this debate should be aired in public, and fostered by the government. Sydney residents would be better off if they were treated like adults, and allowed to consider the various options for improving the city's transport system, instead of being fed another plan.

One lesson the O'Farrell government might draw from the transport failures of Labor is to avoid scratching up ideas behind closed doors, announcing them with a flourish, and then getting forced into defending their flaws.

That didn't work so well.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/politi...#ixzz1Zui1bYiy
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Old October 24th, 2011, 11:32 AM   #137
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Bus operators fail to hit targets but say it's not their fault
Jacob Saulwick
October 24, 2011

Clogged up ... the busy afternoon traffic of Sydney's streets and freeways. Photo: Quentin Jones

THE majority of bus operators across Sydney are failing to meet targets for on-time running, according to new analysis from the state government.

Bus services in the Hills District, north shore, and Fairfield and Cabramatta regions are most likely to be running late, the analysis shows. Operators in only three out of the city's 15 contract regions have met the 95 per cent target for on-time running since February last year. Private bus operators, which are more likely to offer late running services than the government-owned State Transit, attribute the problem to congestion on the road network that is not their fault.

The issue has also not been helped by only patchy implementation of a multimillion-dollar technology system that is designed to give buses priority if they are running late and also to help government transport planners track the best way to move buses through the roads. The Department of Transport, which is scheduled to start renegotiating contracts worth more than $600 million a year with private bus companies, was the subject of a damning audit office report last year into how well it monitored the previous contract round.
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The office found the department largely relied on bus companies self-reporting financial information and performance figures. Subsequent inquiries by the Herald revealed the department had never penalised a contractor for poor performance since the previous contracts were signed in 2005.

To lift the level of performance reporting when new contracts are entered into, for the past 20 months Transport NSW has been employing people to monitor on-time-running at selected points on the road network.

The figures show that on average 92.5 per cent of buses were running on time between February and August 2010. This is below the government's 95 per cent target. Previously the government had recorded on-time running from when buses left the depots.

The four inner-city regions that are operated by State Transit all recorded below 95 per cent on-time running, though they rated higher than private operators running bus services in south-west Sydney, the Hills, and around Chatswood and Terrey Hills.

But the inner-city regions have been the beneficiaries of the government's Public Transport Information and Priority System, which tracks buses using GPS technology and, in theory, should allow bus planners to more efficiently move them through clogged roads.

But the system has not been fully extended to private bus operators, despite those operators moving buses through some of the most congested arteries in Sydney, such as along the M2 to the city.

''The recent on-time running figures released highlighted the need for electronic ticketing and GPS as supported by the Auditor-General,'' said Darryl Mellish, the executive director of BusNSW, which represents private bus companies.

''I expect the areas where OTR figures are lower will be because of the congestion the buses encounter in those regions,'' Mr Mellish said.

The Department of Transport has been extending private bus operator contracts by a year to give it more time to finalise its negotiating stance. It is yet to make a decision on whether to negotiate with existing operators or throw contracts open to tender.

It is also yet to make a decision on how to treat the depots owned by bus companies. Under the previous government the department had wanted to include a provision that would enable them to compulsorily acquire depots, as this would have made it easier for new entrants to compete in the market.

However the industry has resisted this. The Transport Minister, Gladys Berejiklian, has not signalled her stance on the issue.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/bus-operat...#ixzz1bgbBL587
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Old November 13th, 2011, 02:45 AM   #138
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Some pictures from around the network. Taken 6 November 2011.

image hosted on flickr

Rush Hour by Icy Chev, on Flickr
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Docking by Icy Chev, on Flickr
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CityRail train by Icy Chev, on Flickr
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Wharf 4 Crowds by Icy Chev, on Flickr
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SDC12818 by Icy Chev, on Flickr
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Watsons Bay Bus Stop by Icy Chev, on Flickr
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On The 380 by Icy Chev, on Flickr
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Martin Place Station by Icy Chev, on Flickr
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X81 by Icy Chev, on Flickr
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Crowded Bus, Sydney by Icy Chev, on Flickr
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Bondi from the bus by Icy Chev, on Flickr
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Old January 24th, 2012, 12:42 PM   #139
NotTarts
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SYDNEY | Heavy Rail

Sydney has the largest rail network in Australia, with over 1600km of track and 307 stations. Around 360 million trips are made each year, coming to an average patronage of about 1 million per day for rail alone. However, there is no dedicated metro system, with suburban trains instead operating within metro-style underground stations in some areas of the city.

Services are operated and provided by CityRail, a brand of RailCorp, the government corporation tasked with managing rail services throughout New South Wales. The CityRail network also extends to the neighbouring cities of Newcastle and Wollongong.

CityRail Network Map (click to expand)



Fleet
Sydney's network is unique in that every electric multiple unit is bilevel/double-deck. This allows each train to carry around 900 seated passengers.

The fleet consists of 10 train classes - 8 EMUs and 2 DMUs. I've listed the major types here; you can see the rest on CityRail's website .

Suburban
Waratah/A Set (constructed 2010-2014)
Number of cars: 626 (replacing L, R & S sets)
Capacity: 896 seated (8 car set)


Tangara/T and G sets (constructed 1988-1994)
Number of cars: 447
Capacity: 840 seated (8 car set)


L, R and S sets (constructed 1972-1980)
Number of cars: 349 (being replaced by A set)
Capacity: 968 seated (8 car set)


Interurban/Intercity
OSCAR/H set (constructed 2006-present)
Number of cars: 220
Capacity: 432 seated (4 car set)


"InterCity"/V set (constructed 1970-1989)
Number of cars: 225
Capacity: 416 seated (4 car set)


Regional
Hunter railcar (constructed 2006-2007)
Number of cars: 14
Capacity: 146 seated (2 car set)


Endeavour railcar (constructed 1994-1996)
Number of cars: 28
Capacity: 190 seated (2 car set)



Last edited by NotTarts; January 28th, 2012 at 04:41 AM.
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Old January 24th, 2012, 02:30 PM   #140
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Who are those phantom passengers? According to the NSW Railcorp annual report 2010-2011 Cityrail moved 294.5 million passengers. On-time running has been achieved by slowing down the trains so that most services are slower than they were in the 1930s and it is now possibly one of the slowest electric train systems in the world. It barely copes with its task of serving a conurbation of 5 million people, a quarter of the population of Australia.

It is significant that it manages to do what it does but it's nowhere near enough. Underinvestment has been the main problem over the years. This is probably the best summary of the operation:

http://schwandl.blogspot.com/2011/03...-cityrail.html
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