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Old October 29th, 2007, 03:36 PM   #21
RawLee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ssiguy2 View Post
It's great that Phoneix is building the LRT but those frequencies are just horrid. How is it going to be rapid transit if you have to wait that long for a train?

Also.............26,000 passengers a day? That is dreadful. Calgary a city of one million CTrain LRT is 40km long but carries a whopping 240,000 a day.
240000?is that a metro? The busiest traditional city tram line in the world is route 4-6 in Budapest, Hungary, where 50-meter long trams run at 60 to 90 second intervals at peak time and are usually packed with people(200000 daily passengers).
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Old October 29th, 2007, 04:31 PM   #22
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Quote:
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Metropolitan - as in municipal, not "subway" as in French
No, you're wrong. It's some fraction of a municipality taking itself (uhm) to be shirking its suburban constitution. Une autre chose mon ami(e)? The Metropolitain started out English, and, all on its own, it started all that metropolitainy stuff I presume you yourself are drawn toward.

Metro's turning out to have been the predominant term these many past years, gradually replacing tube, underground, and your "subway". By grafting that term onto in-street-running trams tells me that the corresponding hometowns yield little worthwhile checking out.....
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Old October 29th, 2007, 04:38 PM   #23
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Anyone have a map of the phoenix metro line?
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Old October 29th, 2007, 06:55 PM   #24
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metro this, light rail that

^ who cares what this is called - i think that its great that phoenix is getting any form of rail at all.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaeus View Post
Anyone have a map of the phoenix metro line?
no, but valley metro does:
http://www.valleymetro.org/METRO_lig...arter-line.pdf
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Old October 30th, 2007, 03:11 AM   #25
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Calgary's CTrain is LRT like Phoniex.
It runs ever 6 minutes during the day, everyy 4 minutes in rush-hour.
It is, by far, the most successful LRT in NA and one of the most heavily used in the world especially when considering Calgary only has 1 million , 1.2 mil in metro.
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Old November 10th, 2007, 08:19 PM   #26
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Updated pix (Tempe East/ASU)

More photo - this section is Apache in Tempe and east/north of Arizona State University. For the most part, everything is complete (including landscaping) and ready for start of service at the end of next year.

image hosted on flickr


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Old November 10th, 2007, 08:35 PM   #27
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Can you make some photos from the top of those parking lots?
image hosted on flickr

I bet the tracks look awesome from above.
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Old November 11th, 2007, 07:08 AM   #28
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Better still, I'll climb the mountain on the right of the picture - it's a good place for approach shots to the airport.
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Old November 13th, 2007, 11:26 PM   #29
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What is the rationale of encasing the rails in concrete along the median as opposed to having fully exposed rails and ties? I advocate neither method necessarily, I'm just wondering.

Also, when I was first looking at these pictures and you noted that the landscaping was done too, I thought to myself, "where's the grass?" Then I realized that this is Phoenix, not Seattle (where I'm from) and it's in the middle of a desert. Grass isn't practical.

Perhaps a reason the ridership estimates are so low is because Phoenix isn't a very dense city, and thus the demand isn't there (yet).
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Old November 14th, 2007, 08:08 AM   #30
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Quote:
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What is the rationale of encasing the rails in concrete along the median as opposed to having fully exposed rails and ties? I advocate neither method necessarily, I'm just wondering.
We pave it so that emergency vehicles can use it,especially when there is a traffic jam. Buses also can use it,if the tramline is closed.
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Old November 27th, 2007, 05:12 AM   #31
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Update 11/26: Washington Street, Margaret Hance Park

A cloudy day in Phoenix. These shots are on Washington /Jefferson street between 7th avenue and 44th avenue.

Also, a section under construction on Central near McDowell Road.

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Old July 11th, 2008, 08:43 AM   #32
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First light rail train pulls into Phoenix station
10 July 2008

PHOENIX (AP) - Chirping its tinny electric horn, Phoenix's first light rail train parted traffic and cruised into its new downtown station Thursday as officials hoped to erase the long-standing stigma of being one of the last major cities in the West without a commuter train.

The $1.4 billion, taxpayer-supported METRO light rail stretches 20 miles through Phoenix, Tempe and Mesa and promises to have a train at each of its 24 stations every 10 minutes during peak times. It officially opens in December.

"Isn't it beautiful?" Mayor Phil Gordon said as the gray and turquoise air-conditioned train stopped at the Washington Street/Central Avenue station. "This is not like the old Chicago Els. This is not dirty. This is moving people efficiently and effectively."

Gordon and other city leaders expect the trains to transform Phoenix's slumbering downtown area, ferrying thousands of pedestrians onto city sidewalks. They say it will lure new shops to the area and turn rows of shuttered buildings into prime real estate.

"Look around you, it's already transformed downtown Phoenix," Gordon said. "There are couples out here with their children, people jogging, new bars and restaurants and taverns and boutiques."

Getting here wasn't easy.

For decades, proposals to invest in mass transit stalled in city boardrooms. Residents fretted about rail stations near their homes. Others wondered if it was smart to spend billions of dollars to lay train tracks through Arizona's sprawling communities.

While Denver, Salt Lake City, Dallas and other Western cities planned and installed commuter rail lines, Phoenix residents said their city was meant for cars.

In 2000, voters in Phoenix finally approved a sales tax increase for light rail and other transportation projects. METRO, which is run by a transportation agency that's funded by cities in the Phoenix area, has spent the past several years designing the cars and weaving train tracks through city streets.

Officials expect 26,000 boardings per day in the first year. Passengers will pay $1.25 per trip, the same as they would for a bus.

One of the first changes people will notice when the trains start running later this year is reduced traffic during major sporting events, METRO CEO Rick Simonetta said.

"We can put three cars together to carry as many as 600 people," Simonetta said.

"When you think about a ball game ending, or a (Phoenix) Suns game ending, or something down at Sun Devil Stadium in Tempe, we'll have the ability to really move a lot of people," he said.

METRO officials will spend the next few months testing the light rail tracks and getting them ready for commuter use. They also plan to expand the track to surrounding communities during the next two decades.

Glenn Darby, 25, joined a crowd of residents and city workers to watch the sleek light rail car arrive for the first time. Darby, who lives in a condo in downtown Phoenix, said the train will make life a lot easier.

"We don't have a grocery store downtown, and it makes it rough for people to try to move here," Darby said. "It's really kind of dead out here. If you need a late night snack, there's nowhere to go."

John Vandercook, 24, agreed. Vandercook, a hotel concierge who lives downtown, said he'll park his Mini Cooper and save on gas money when the train comes in.

"Finally, Phoenix will be a real city. You won't have to drive everywhere, not have to wait 30 minutes in the heat for a bus," Vandercook said.

"This is something that's going to change life for a lot of people."
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Old July 11th, 2008, 09:31 AM   #33
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They'll have to speed up extension plans, because Phoenix is extremely vulnerable to the coming energy crunch.

'specially thanks to the permanent need for air conditioning.
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Old July 11th, 2008, 01:59 PM   #34
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Old July 11th, 2008, 06:46 PM   #35
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Nice. But at least in the outskirts I would prefer "grass tracks" instead of these ugly concrete corridors.
Maybe in Phoenix it's too dry/hot for that, but in general it looks better.
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Old July 11th, 2008, 07:08 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thun View Post
Nice. But at least in the outskirts I would prefer "grass tracks" instead of these ugly concrete corridors.
Maybe in Phoenix it's too dry/hot for that, but in general it looks better.
Phoenix is in a Desert and it would be a waist of water in an already water starved enviroment.
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Old December 28th, 2008, 08:56 AM   #37
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PHOENIX | LRT

The Phoenix valley in Arizona is the most recent light rail to open in the United States. The light rail system here, constructed for $1.4 billion, opened on Saturday, December 27th, 2008, to anxious crowds waiting to board for the grand opening experience. Almost 100,000 visitors waited to board the first trains of the Valley Metro Light Rail.

I was on vacation for the holidays and visiting my dad and his wife in Mesa, Arizona. My trip perfectly coincided with the grand opening so I attended, taking for you all of these beautiful pictures.

The light rail connects the northwest area of Phoenix to major points of interest in downtown Phoenix, then to downtown Tempe (home of Arizona State University and a lot of shopping, commercial and residential development) and finally to the western edge of Mesa. Expansion plans and designs are already underway.

image hosted on flickr

Two trains pass each other in downtown Tempe.

image hosted on flickr

An eastbound train turns onto Apache Boulevard from Terrace Road.

image hosted on flickr

A westbound train turns northwest onto Terrace Road from Apache Boulevard.

I took over 250 photos. They're still uploading here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jamesbondsv/
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Old December 28th, 2008, 09:29 AM   #38
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Looks great!

$1.4B seems quite expensive - how long is the line exactly?

Well done Phoenix. Maybe the expansions you mentioned could be funded by Obama's stimulus package?
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Old December 28th, 2008, 11:09 AM   #39
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cool looks nice

i read the line is 20 miles
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Old December 28th, 2008, 11:16 AM   #40
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Great news. And the trains look pretty sleek, IMO.

The coverage, for the opening looks pretty decent...like the stations as well.

Hopefully this encourages more denser TOD development. No offense, but I don't think the "anti-highrise, anti-urban" movement is stronger in any metro in the US than Phoenix. And now, it has rail again since Amtrak left it a while ago.
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