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Old January 23rd, 2011, 03:36 AM   #81
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Originally Posted by Woonsocket54 View Post
If the problem in Miami is "it's not the heat, it's the humidity" then shaded platforms aren't really the solution.

Valley Metro probably could provide more shade from the hot Arizona sun, but would that even matter? John McCain got skin cancer, and I don't even think he rides light rail.
At least it rains in Miami.
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Old January 23rd, 2011, 05:22 AM   #82
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Originally Posted by Woonsocket54 View Post
If the problem in Miami is "it's not the heat, it's the humidity" then shaded platforms aren't really the solution.

Valley Metro probably could provide more shade from the hot Arizona sun, but would that even matter? John McCain got skin cancer, and I don't even think he rides light rail.
Well the headway for Metrorail trains during rush hour is about 7 &1/2 to 10 minutes only so that's not too long to wait. After the rush hours, service is every 15 minutes. Miami isn't the only city that suffers from humudity though.
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Old January 23rd, 2011, 09:12 AM   #83
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Southeast Phoenix metro is rolling out BRT early next week.


source: http://www.cptdb.ca/index.php?showto...0&#entry466657

"The LINK" is in Mesa and Chandler, exurban Arizona. The bus line connects to the Sycamore light-rail station.

East Valley Tribune
http://www.eastvalleytribune.com/loc...tml?mode=story

Quote:
Two new bus lines to debut in East Valley
Posted: Thursday, January 20, 2011 4:43 pm | Updated: 9:45 pm, Fri Jan 21, 2011.

By Garin Groff, Tribune

Two new bus lines debut in the East Valley Monday morning, each providing some firsts for commuters.

For riders who take the new LINK route on Arizona Avenue in Chandler, the line provides the city's first limited-stop service to the Metro light-rail station in Mesa.

And an extended Power Road line gives commuters their first access to the burgeoning Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport and the Red Mountain campus of Mesa Community College.

Both cities have fought for years to get the routes in service because of their importance to economic development, tourism and daily commuting.

The Power route fills a big gap, as the Gateway airport's nearly 1 million annual passengers have no transit service. Mesa doesn't have ridership projections, but Mesa Councilman Scott Somers predicted commuters will use one of the few transit routes in east Mesa.

"That is going to be one of the more popular and utilized routes in the East Valley," Somers said. "The connections to educational institutions, job centers, shopping, a major reliever airport - I can't think of any route, save just a handful in downtown Phoenix to the airport, that touch so many economically important areas."

The MCC branch campus has been the source of complaints from students who can take a bus to the Dobson High campus but not the Red Mountain one, said Mike James, Mesa's assistant transportation director.

The new route had minimal costs, as the city is only installing signs at the stops and a small number of benches, James said. The route features 30-minute service through the day and every 15 minutes during the morning and afternoon peak periods.

The Arizona Avenue line passes through Mesa, Chandler and the edge of Gilbert at a cost of $11.1 million. The line was to be funded through the Proposition 400 transportation fund, but the recession knocked the project off the list. Instead, it was funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

The line is called LINK, as it links commuters from as far as a park-and-ride lot near Arizona Avenue and Germann Road to the Metro station in west Mesa. Because of the tie-in, bus interiors resemble light-rail trains and the stations mimic those of Metro. The stations display when the next bus will arrive and sell boarding passes. Valley Metro expects more than 1,300 riders a day.

The line runs on Gilbert's edge, where town officials hope to boost transit use, Gilbert Vice Mayor Les Presmyk said. The town recently added sidewalks and bike lanes, he said, to the Fiesta Tech business park that borders Gilbert's new station.

While the line makes it easier for Gilbert residents to reach downtown Phoenix, Presmyk said he wants the new line to encourage commuters to discover his community's downtown.

Chandler expects the LINK to spur denser development along a transit corridor that could eventually include light-rail. The service will run as late as 1 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, mirroring light-rail hours and making it easier for East Valley residents to access the nightlife in Tempe and Phoenix.

"This is a milestone day for transit in the East Valley," Chandler Mayor Jay Tibshraeny said.

The line also passes through the new plaza at City Hall and a revamped streetscape in downtown. The LINK should boost downtown's appeal, said Dale Steiner, a dentist whose office has been just north of downtown for 20 years.

He attended a ribbon-cutting this week to show his support for the line, saying he expects to use it often to volunteer in downtown Phoenix and to see Arizona Diamondbacks games. He anticipates the growing number of downtown restaurants will draw more visitors via the transit line, which he expects to help the entire community's image.

"If you have a thriving downtown, it's viewed as a thriving city."


Tim Hacker. A Valley Metro bus station on the corner of Arizona Avenue and Chandler Boulevard, shown Thursday, Jan. 20, 2011 in Chandler. Two new transit lines begin service Monday, with a LINK route running along Arizona Ave/ Country Club Drive from Germann to McKellips.
Arizona Republic
http://www.azcentral.com/community/m...big-steps.html

Quote:
Southeast Valley transit system to take 2 big steps Monday

by Gary Nelson - Jan. 20, 2011 01:38 PM
The Arizona Republic

The Southeast Valley's public transit system is poised to take two giant steps into the future.

Beginning Monday:

• The Link, an express bus service with limited stops, will run from downtown Chandler up Arizona Avenue and Country Club Drive to Main Street in Mesa, then westward to the Sycamore light-rail station. It will be the most direct connection yet for Chandler and Gilbert residents to the light-rail line.

Route 184 will run north-south on Power Road from Mesa Community College's Red Mountain campus to Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport.

The Power Road bus line is both a product and, officials hope, an engine of growing economic and educational clout in east Mesa and Gilbert.

"The Power Road route is really a big deal for the East Valley because it connects so many employment centers," said Councilman Scott Somers, who represents southeast Mesa.

Gilbert Councilman Les Presmyk hailed the Link route as "a responsible and convenient transportation mode, enhancing our environmentally-friendly options and making travel to and from Gilbert dramatically easier."

He said its link to the light-rail system "means the ability to travel to downtown Phoenix and back with minimal time behind the wheel" and "a safe and relaxing ride on a night out between Gilbert, Tempe. Mesa and Phoenix and inexpensive travel for our students between ASU's downtown campus and the colleges we enjoy here in Gilbert."

Presmyk also noted that Gilbert's neighbors can travel to the town. "As we continue to grow as a destination point," he said, "it is vital we embrace today's innovative transportation options."

He said, "The Fiesta Tech industrial corridor, which includes Costco, Earnhardt's and Orbital Sciences, in northwest Gilbert, has gained new sidewalks and bike lanes in addition to this new link to light rail. This will allow their employees new and alternative ways to travel to and from work."

The Power Road line will take passengers to numerous high-profile destinations: Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport, Chandler-Gilbert Community College, Arizona State University's Polytechnic campus, the House of Refuge shelter, the East Valley Institute of Technology campus under construction, Gilbert Hospital, Superstition Springs Center, Banner Baywood Medical Center, and MCC's Red Mountain campus.

Town spokeswoman Beth Lucas said the Power Road route "dramatically enhances" travel to and from southeast Gilbert.

"We are talking about a direct connection to our thriving community airport here, and to the local colleges and schools," she said. "This new route connects us along the Power Knowledge Corridor to a major shopping center, hotels and our hospitals. The importance of this corridor for our future economic success cannot be underscored enough."

The Power Road route also will take people to the transit center at Power Road and U.S. 60, where they can board local buses, express buses to Phoenix and the Link, which runs directly to the Sycamore light-rail station.

"There's a pretty star-studded list of destinations along that corridor," said Susan Tierney, spokeswoman for Valley Metro, which runs the buses and trains.

"It's been a partnership between Gilbert and Mesa and us to get this route developed and initiated," Tierney said.

Somers said, "It was a battle to get the route, to convince people of its need. It was a battle to get the funding and keep the funding."

The federal stimulus program paid for the Link extension; operating costs will come from the countywide Proposition 400 transportation sales tax. The Power Road line is being funded by Prop. 400 and a federal grant.

North-south service on Power Road will be a godsend for House of Refuge clients, Executive Director Nancy Marion said. The center helps about 350 previously homeless people a year find permanent housing.

Until now, the shelter has been served by an east-west route along Williams Field Road, but that didn't connect with child-care facilities - one of the crucial needs for financially struggling families.

The Power Road route will take people to child care and to retail employment opportunities and bus connections to the rest of the Valley.

Somers said the Southeast Valley faces other key transportation decisions.

Mesa is trying to get the light-rail line funded to Gilbert Road, from where it could either continue east on Main Street, or south on Gilbert to U.S. 60 and beyond. "That's going to be for another generation of politicians to decide," he said.

Even bigger than that would be creation of a commuter rail system, perhaps from the San Tan Valley area into the heart of the metro area. That idea is only in preliminary discussions.

Tierney said ridership on the first Link line in Mesa has not increased since it opened two years ago, suggesting the area's high unemployment might have played a part in that.

"Things may change if we get $5 a gallon gas," she said, noting that some economists are expecting that in the near future and that transit ridership jumped when gas prices hit $4 two summers ago.

All 20 stations along the Arizona Avenue route are designed to allow breeze and shade in the summer yet provide warmth from winter sun.

Bus-arrival information at each station gives real-time information to waiting passengers; those with impaired vision can push a button to hear that information. Tierney said the service is testing an online bus tracking system for mobile users that will show bus locations in real time. The service also is trying to lure new passengers with a "how to ride" feature on the website.

Some things won't be in place when buses start running Monday. The fare-vending machines planned for 12 of the 20 stations won't be installed until April, Tierney said. Until then, the more economical advance tickets must be purchased at participating retailers, colleges and utility outlets.

Republic staff writer Edythe Jensen contributed to this report.
And because Arizona is the self-proclaimed "Mecca for Prejudice and Bigotry," let's pull a comment from the Arizona Republic website, typical of the local response to bus routes:

Quote:
Being from the Northeast originally and having public transit for a much longer time I can tell you this.
Public transportation is only good for mostly low income people. It promotes moving low income people into going into the nicer communities which there by brings more crime.

So you can say what you want but in the end Public transportation is nothing but a drain on the tax payers to start with and eventually it will bring more crime our way. When the low income people have no cars, they take public transportaion to get to the places that have nice homes, cars etc and they like to take them for themselves.
Wait and see !!!

Last edited by Woonsocket54; January 23rd, 2011 at 09:33 AM.
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Old January 25th, 2011, 06:19 AM   #84
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wow

Ok east coast ignorant doughbag

What about our kids and students that cant afford cars yet

or people that crashed their cars!!!???

or people that have a suspended lisence do to speeding tickets?

are those people criminals also???

Get a life and see the real world
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Old January 25th, 2011, 06:28 AM   #85
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AMAZING SUGGESTION!!!!! PLEASE READ!!!!

So I get off the bus on main street and Greenfield
I live on Greenfield and brown in east mesa
I get off the bus at 6:30 and start walking the 2 1/2 mile walk home
Within the hour or so i see six NOT IN SERVICE BUSSES PASS!!!! SIX!!!!
My guess is that there is a bus garage somewhere near by
My suggestion is that while these multiple busses pass by empty they should stop wasting their gas and pick up passengers on the way!!!
SUGGESTING A BUS LINE ON GREENFIELD ROAD PLEASE!!!!!!!!!
It is much needed
thank you for your time
SimplySensible <3

ps. how do i write to city council and get my point across so i can see change??????
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Old January 25th, 2011, 07:58 AM   #86
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I get off the bus at 6:30 and start walking the 2 1/2 mile walk home
SimplySensible, you're a brave soul, especially when you're doing that in summer.

*better to not react too much to the newspaper reader comments section- it's the repository of a lot of lexical diarrhea, and makes the comments of typical SSC trolls seem measured and reasonable in comparison...
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Old January 25th, 2011, 06:20 PM   #87
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Quote:
"Being from the Northeast originally and having public transit for a much longer time I can tell you this. Public transportation is only good for mostly low income people. It promotes moving low income people into going into the nicer communities which there by brings more crime.

So you can say what you want but in the end Public transportation is nothing but a drain on the tax payers to start with and eventually it will bring more crime our way. When the low income people have no cars, they take public transportaion to get to the places that have nice homes, cars etc and they like to take them for themselves.
Wait and see !!!"
Idiotic claptrap. Glad he doesn't live in the Northeast anymore. But... this is an all too common idea trotted out--that somehow, mass transit will allow "undesireables" (use your imagination here) to invade "nice" communities.

His last sentence is kind of confusing. Is he saying that low-income people are going to use Valley Metro for the purpose of stealing cars (owned by 'nice' people, presumably) and to look for houses to 'squat' in?

This type of resistance to mass transit seems largely confined to the U.S. In Italy, for example, neighborhoods are more likely to complain that they're being bypassed by a new rail line than to complain a new station or extension will destroy "their neighborhood's unique character" or whatever.
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Old January 26th, 2011, 12:18 AM   #88
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I agree, but it's not as bad as it used to be. When my state(Maryland) start building the light rail in the late 80's, everybody feared crime will go up because the undesirables will move in and commit crimes in their "utopian" neighborhoods and destroy property values.
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Old January 26th, 2011, 05:23 AM   #89
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I never could understand the mentality of those people who say mass transit brings an increase in crime. Criminals also have cars as well or if they don't they can always carjack someone or steal a car to gain some wheels. Case in point look at Arlington, TX or Clayton County, Georgia which has plenty of run down areas despite *gasp* no mass transit.
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Old January 26th, 2011, 07:55 AM   #90
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Probably people who never used transit and/or have been brainwashed by anti-mass transit propaganda. These same people are probably racist too.
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Old January 26th, 2011, 09:05 AM   #91
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan78 View Post
This type of resistance to mass transit seems largely confined to the U.S. In Italy, for example, neighborhoods are more likely to complain that they're being bypassed by a new rail line than to complain a new station or extension will destroy "their neighborhood's unique character" or whatever.
I'd not jump into the bandwagon so fast... First, "new rail lines" (regional ones, not mere tramways that mix with traffic) haven't been built in a while in Italy, save for cases of rectification and, of course, high-speed rail lines (which is a totally different issue).

Second, trams and subways sometimes do get fiercely opposed by residents of more upscale areas, for reasons slightly different than those from US, but not much. Milano3 (an upscale neighborhood built as planned community in 1972) is an example of that, among many others. There, in Italy, concerns usually range on the place being made accessible for non-standard-households (meaning: students, young couples, immigrant families etc).

In any case, I guess the opposition is less about mass transit itself, but about perspectives that the neighborhood could change not only demographically (living in a place unaccessible for transit is a good hedge against massive influx of illegal immigrants as, AFAIK, it's been increasingly difficult for illegals to get driver's license) but also in terms of zoning. Once there is light-rail or tramway going into your are, developers could start pressing for multi-story buildings to be allowed along the transit corridor, and for residential streets/avenues where transit goes through to be rezoned to allow commercial activity.

Even if the opposition is "coded" in the form of "let's stop crime", it usually is about changing the neighborhood character.

As much as I usually oppose transit on moral grounds (it promotes a less individualistic lifestyle), I also oppose this manipulation of data or irrational fears to promote NIMBY-ism, as no neighborhood has any inherited "right" to keep its demographic profile intact and ban everybody else. The second part of the argument should not justify opposition to transit either: "pressure" from developers should be kept at bay by keeping the zoning and not changing it.

I am more sympathetic to anti-transit opposition when it comes already tied with rezoning as a way to promote the money needed to fund the project. I can understand the use of eminent domain to build transit, but it is hard to accept the idea of a local government rezoning an area around a transit corridor just to capitalize on future development taxes.
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Old January 26th, 2011, 03:27 PM   #92
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Point conceded. I was making a more general observation based on my own experiences, but I'm sure counterexamples exist.

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Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
As much as I usually oppose transit on moral grounds (it promotes a less individualistic lifestyle).
Does it? And if so, why is an individualistic lifestyle inherently better? I take it from your name and sig that you're a proponent of American-style, low density sprawl.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
I am more sympathetic to anti-transit opposition when it comes already tied with rezoning as a way to promote the money needed to fund the project. I can understand the use of eminent domain to build transit, but it is hard to accept the idea of a local government rezoning an area around a transit corridor just to capitalize on future development taxes.
Zoning and covenants have been ways the U.S. government has historically promoted low-density greenfield development. Removing them simply allows market forces to build what was artificially blocked--medium to high-density, mixed use development.
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Old January 26th, 2011, 08:56 PM   #93
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I, for the life of me, can't comprehend of anyone opposing public transit on moral grounds. It's just so illogical.
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Old January 27th, 2011, 05:07 AM   #94
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Does anyone know what it the expected farebox recovery rate for this new Phoenix project?
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Old January 29th, 2011, 02:14 AM   #95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SimplySensible View Post
So I get off the bus on main street and Greenfield
I live on Greenfield and brown in east mesa
I get off the bus at 6:30 and start walking the 2 1/2 mile walk home
Within the hour or so i see six NOT IN SERVICE BUSSES PASS!!!! SIX!!!!
My guess is that there is a bus garage somewhere near by
My suggestion is that while these multiple busses pass by empty they should stop wasting their gas and pick up passengers on the way!!!
SUGGESTING A BUS LINE ON GREENFIELD ROAD PLEASE!!!!!!!!!
It is much needed
thank you for your time
SimplySensible <3

ps. how do i write to city council and get my point across so i can see change??????
SimplySensible, yes the RPTA bus depot is on Greenfield, about a half mile south of the Loop 202 Red Mountain.

Secondly, a bus on Greenfield (probably to be named Route 160) is planned. But according to the 2010 Update of the Regional Transportation Plan, that route is expected to start service sometime between 2021 and 2025. And that is only if funding is available. And then when Proposition 400 ends (in 2025) a new transportation tax will need to be approved or the City of Mesa will have to take over the funding.

Third, Route 136 provides service on Brown during weekday rush hours (although only four trips are provided per direction - two in the morning and two in the afternoon). I am not sure if the timetable fits with your own schedule or it it takes you where you need to go (or at least to another route where you can connect to get to your destination). But I thought I should inform you of this alternative.
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Old January 29th, 2011, 04:14 AM   #96
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The Arizona Republic
http://www.azcentral.com/community/m...rvice0126.html

Quote:


Brian Sexton

Bus service to Gateway along Power Road launched
Route 184 runs along Power, links northeast Mesa, southeast Gilbert

by Art Thomason - Jan. 26, 2011 10:46 AM
The Arizona Republic

The first-ever bus service to Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport was launched this week amid fanfare and gloom.

Public officials hailed the new Valley Metro route as an essential link to college campuses, shopping and hospitals, but they also cautioned that rising gasoline prices are expected to create additional demand for transit as revenue to support it shrinks drastically.

Mesa Mayor Scott Smith and Gilbert Vice Mayor Les Presmyk hailed Route 184 as a vital connection for the two communities plus Arizona State University Polytechnic and Chandler-Gilbert Community College that contributed to the reliever airport's rapid growth.

The new bus line will also provide transportation to and from jobs for residents of the area who cannot afford vehicles, said Nancy Marion, executive director of House of Refuge, a transitional residence near the airport for homeless families.

"This is a way of connecting our families to a vein of self-sufficiency," she said.

The new route along Power Road from Mesa Community College's Red Mountain Campus at McKellips Road to the airport's Charles L. Williams Passenger Terminal, had been scheduled to begin last June but was delayed until Monday.

The service is considered to be a critical element of Mesa's and Gilbert's overall transportation plans, which call for linking regions with light-rail service.

But for all its salutations during Monday's ribbon-cutting ceremony at the passenger terminal, there were sobering reminders of what's in store for Valley transit services.

The bus service is part of a 20-year, Valley-wide transportation plan approved by voters in 2004 and funded with a half-cent sales-tax increase.

However, the recessionary economy dragged sales-tax revenue woefully short of projections and delivered a Valley-wide transit funding shortfall that now stands at $2 billion, said Bryan Jungwirth, Valley Metro's chief of staff.

Those losses are exacerbated by the state Legislature's decision last year to eliminate a program that poured $22 million a year from the state Lottery into local transportation.

Mesa's Mayor Smith said that while effective, multimodal transit services are vital to strengthen the economy, cutbacks are "a change in reality" to which everyone will have to adjust.

"It will not have the resources to serve everybody," he said. "We can't tax our way out of this, and that's not a political statement - it's a mathematical one."

Scott Somers, a member of the Regional Public Transportation Authority and councilman from Mesa's 6th District, which includes the airport, said he will ask the authority to consider consolidating or eliminating bus routes, including two in Mesa, that are redundant.

Passengers may have to walk farther to a bus stop in some cases, he said.

The Power Road bus to the airport was launched as new Arizona Avenue buses started service to give Chandler and Gilbert their long-awaited connection to the light-rail line.

Valley Metro spokeswoman Susan Tierney said bus ridership is expected to increase, especially as gasoline prices soar above $3 a gallon.

Last year, bus service, which is the Valley's most extensive mode of public transit, lost 10 million Valley Metro fares as bus riders returned to their cars or found other forms of transportation as gasoline prices declined.

The drop was part of a nationwide downturn of 4 percent in bus ridership during the first quarter of 2010, according to the American Public Transportation Association.

Transit officials attributed the Valley-wide drop to high unemployment, a fare increase, adjusted schedules that produce longer waits at some bus stops, and gas prices staying below $3 a gallon since October 2008.

Somers said Route 184 is expected to attract substantial ridership from airport employees, university and college students, nearby Gilbert and Queen Creek residents and airport passengers.

"The options for traveling to and from Gilbert take off with this new bus route," Presmyk said. "Our new route connects southeast Gilbert to the rest of our town and the entire region and opens new opportunities for passengers to travel to school, work, shops and our airport along the Power knowledge corridor."

Smith said a federal grant provides funds to provide 15-minute frequency service during peak weekday hours.

"I hope 184 is the beginning of a transition in this area," he said.

Last edited by Woonsocket54; January 29th, 2011 at 04:27 AM.
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Old January 29th, 2011, 04:18 PM   #97
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Some article on how areas near the Phoenix light rail line are being revitalized.

Quote:
Light rail brings renewed vigor to older Tempe neighborhoods
Dianna M. Náñez - Feb. 28, 2009 07:30 AM
http://www.azcentral.com/12news/news...do0228-CP.html
The Arizona Republic

A 1950s Tempe apartment complex is getting a second life as a posh condo development.

The outside of Lemon Street's Regency Condos still resembles the scores of weathered-brick apartments that span the campus neighborhood.

But the inside of the studios and one-bedrooms were given a face lift that includes chocolate-colored Italian cabinets, stone countertops, built-in modern furniture and stainless-steel appliances.

Located along the light-rail line, blocks from Arizona State University and a light-rail station, Regency developer Miravista Holdings saw a smart investment in the mid-century complex.

Joe Bushong, a sales agent for the condos, said Miravista staked a claim to the project two years ago when light rail was still under construction.

"They saw the potential in an old apartment complex that had fallen into disrepair," he said.

Regency hosted its grand opening Thursdayand has started taking sale reservations on the condos.


Building along the tracks

Miravista's Regency venture is reflective of the billions of dollars light rail has spurred in public and private investments along the 20-mile track weaving through Phoenix, Tempe and Mesa.

Hillary Foose, a Metro light-rail spokeswoman, said that that Metro has tracked those investments.

Metro estimates that since 2004 $7.4 billion in planned, under construction or completed construction is targeted along the rail line.

That development money dwarfs the $1.4 billion price tag to build light rail. Metro recently published a brochure highlighting economic development along light rail. Those projects include Phoenix's Tapestry residential project on Central Avenue and Tempe's Grigio Metro apartment homes on McClintock Drive.


Affordability matters

Bushong said Miravista has helped develop several Tempe projects.

Redeveloping in the older Tempe neighborhood east of ASU offered Miravista a chance to build affordable condos near campus, Bushong said. Regency's studios start at $179,000 and one-bedroom units start at $197,000.

"There's . . . (few homes) in the Tempe area that are under $200,000, particularly not right by campus," he said.

The marketing plan for Regency in a difficult real-estate market is to focus on the benefits of buying compared to renting.

"It's hard to beat the affordability of these condos when compared to rent or a dorm," he said. "A lot of one-bedroom apartments within walking distance of ASU start at $1,000 (a month). You pay less per month in our condos and you have an investment when your kid graduates."

For many out-of-state students who do not own a car, it's hard to beat the convenience of living blocks from a light-rail station, Bushong said. Students with classes at ASU's downtown campus can hop on a train, get off on Central Avenue and walk to class. Light rail also makes it easy to get to and from Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport.
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Old January 30th, 2012, 02:52 AM   #98
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Phoenix East Valley light rail


http://www.hdrinc.com/portfolio/cent...t-rail-transit


http://www.hdrinc.com/portfolio/cent...t-rail-transit


http://www.hdrinc.com/portfolio/cent...t-rail-transit
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Old May 30th, 2012, 08:14 PM   #99
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East Valley Tribune
http://www.eastvalleytribune.com/mon...9bb2963f4.html

Quote:
Posted: Monday, May 28, 2012 7:14 am | Updated: 9:25 am, Tue May 29, 2012.

Metro breaks ground Wednesday on Mesa light rail segment
By Garin Groff, Tribune East Valley Tribune

Metro will hold a groundbreaking Wednesday to celebrate a new light rail segment that will link downtown Mesa to Tempe and Phoenix.

The 3.1-mile, $200 million extension will be the first new segment since Metro opened the 20-mile system in December 2008. While the transit system is seen as a catalyst for downtown Mesa, Metro anticipates Wednesday’s kickoff will draw people from across the Valley.

Train aficionados have already shown interest, but Metro spokeswoman Hillary Foose said a broader range of people are welcome.

“We want the community — residents, business owners, young people — to all be a part of the history of our project and the history of transit in the Valley,” Foose said.

Actual construction will begin within a few weeks. The extension along Main Street will shift the system’s end-point from Sycamore to just east of Mesa Drive and add four stations.

With construction will come a campaign to encourage people to patronize businesses in the construction zone.

Metro will play a role by holding events for other milestones, Foose said. That could include something when the first track is installed, as transit stations rise from the ground and when art is installed. Also, Metro is working with the city and Downtown Mesa Association on ideas like temporary art made by children so visitors would see more than a construction zone, Foose said. The plans are still in development.

“We want to make sure we keep this project, and more importantly the business community, top of mind,” Foose said.

Metro expects the Mesa segment will open in 2015. Metro has decided to hold more celebratory events during this project than during construction of the original segment, Foose said.

Metro will issue commemorative post cards at milestone events, the first of which is Wednesday’s groundbreaking.

DMA executive director David Short said some events on Main Street will have to make some changes or even shift to a side street. The DMA hasn’t finalized its event plans yet because the construction schedule hasn’t been finalized yet. That should happen soon, Short said.

However, the DMA is making the case that the public will barely notice the construction because businesses along Main Street in the downtown have rear entrances. While events can boost interest in downtown, Short said basic access is a top priority.

“Downtown is going to be very accessible from the all the back lots and also Main Street,” he said. “Keeping our businesses active on a normal day-to-day basis without events is also an important key to this.”

He said construction will be minimal in downtown for the June 29-30 Arizona Celebration of Freedom.

“You probably won’t even notice it at all,” Short said.

Contact writer: (480) 898-6548 or [email protected]
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Old May 30th, 2012, 10:11 PM   #100
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Wow, plans are made! 2031! Grat job*, but at that time we would probably be able to use teletransponders!

What the heck do they plan to do meanwhile? All the plans from this map should be already done by the 2016!

*sarcasm
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