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Old January 4th, 2011, 08:16 PM   #1
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TBILISI | Public Transport

Tbilisi (Tiflis) is the capital of the former Soviet republic of Georgia, situated in the Caucasus. The city has almost 1.5 million inhabitants and extends 40 km north - south along the river Mtkwari (Kura). The valley is surrounded by mountains what makes road traffic especially difficult.

METRO (1966 - present)

Therefore plans for a subway system were made already in the early 1950's when the city had only 750,000 inhabitants.

The first line (Akhmeteli-Varketili Line, formerly Didube-Samgorskaya) opened in 1966 from Dibude to Rustaveli (6.3 km, 6 stations) via the city centre. A few years later it was extended towards the south to 300 Aragveli (1967) and Samgori (1971). During the 1980's it reached its current length of 19.6 km with 16 stations.

In 1979, the second line (Saburtalo Line) began operating between Vagzlis Moedani (railway station) and Delisi. In the year 2000 it was extended to its current terminus Vazha Pshavela. The line has a total length of 6.7 km with 6 stations.

Most station names were changed during the 1990's after the dissolution of the former USSR and the independence of Georgia. Trains in service are of the 81-717 and 81-714 series also running in Moscow and other ex-Soviet cities. Stations have 100 m long platforms for 5-car trains, although only 3 or 4-car trains are currently used.

Akhmeteli-Varketili Line - 19.6 km, 16 stations

11 Jan 1966: Dibude - Rustaveli (6.3 km, 6 stations)
06 Nov 1967: Rustaveli - 300 Aragveli (ex 300 Aragvinzev)
05 May 1971: 300 Aragveli - Samgori
08 Nov 1985: Samgori - Varketili
16 Nov 1985: Didube - Guramishvili (ex TEVZ)
07 Jan 1989: Guramishvili - Akhmetelis teatri

Saburtalo Line - 6.7 km, 6 stations

15 Sept 1979: Sadguris Moedani (ex Vagzlis Moedani and Pl. Vokzalna) - Delisi (6.2 km, 5 stations)
02 April 2000: Delisi - Vazha Pshavela

Some (or all) station names have been changed from Russian into Georgian, so older names found on some maps are given in brackets. Other former names: Pl. Lenina for Tavisuplebis Moedani (Freedom Sq.); 26 Komissarov for Avlabari; Okyabrskaya for Nadzeladevi; Komsomolskaya for Medikal Institut.

More station names were renamed in 2011: Elektrodepo > Gotsiridze; Vagzlis Moedani (1 and 2) > Sadguris Moedani (Station square); Tsereteli Gamziri > Tsereteli; Politeknikuri > Teknikuri Universiteti (Technical university); Sameditsino instituti > Sameditsino Universiteti (Medical University); Universiteti (under construction) > Sahelmtsipo Universiteti (State University)

An extension of the second line to the University is under construction, opening is scheduled for June 2017.

As of 2016, the system consists of two lines, serving 22 stations, operating on 27.1 kilometres (16.8 mi) of route and 62.5 kilometres (38.8 mi) of track.Of the 22 stations, 20 stations are below ground and two are surface level. Of the subterranean stations, 16 are deep level and 4 shallow. The former comprise 6 pylon stations, 5 column and 5 single vaults (built to the Leningrad Technology). The shallow stations consist of three pillar-trispans and one single vault (Kharkov Technology). Due to Tbilisi's uneven landscape, the Metro, particularly the Gldani-Varketili line, has one surface-level section.

An estimated total of 105.6 million people used the Metro annually as at 2005, tough the actual figure by 2012 was closer to 94 million.

Trains run from 6:00 until midnight, with intervals ranging between 2 1/2 minutes at peak times to 12 minutes late at night. Train speeds are 60–90 kilometres per hour, while the average trip speed is slightly over 33 kilomtres.





FUNICULAR (1905 - present)

The Tbilisi Funicular is also a mountainous cable-operated railroad with upper and lower stations.

But the word Funicular has acquired an additional connotation – it has become a Tbilisi toponym, similar to Kala, Ortachala, Sololaki, Vera, etc… When we mention the Funicular, the Mount of Mtatsminda, the Mamadaviti Church and the Pantheon immediately appear in front of us. This is how the Funicular has become a historical monument and a place where Tbilisi can be viewed with a special charm and beauty.

A little bit of its history:

The Tbilisi Funicular was constructed to develop the Mtatsminda plateau. In the second half of the 19th century, when the borders of old Tbilisi expanded and the construction of "European Tbilisi" commenced on the Golovin Avenue (today’s Rustaveli Avenue), a decision was made to develop the Mtatsminda plateau. At that time, Mtatsminda was "a no man’s land", an uninhabited place "where over the distance of several miles your sight would catch neither a tall tree nor a mere shrub". To go up the hill, first it was necessary to build a road. The most suitable way to do so was a cable railroad, or a funicular. At that time, such roads were constructed in many countries and enjoyed immense popularity.

With regard to the construction of the Funicular, the opinion of the community was varied. At the City Council meeting, one of the "voters" declared: "Such a structure is an object of luxury. The Funicular can be built in Tbilisi when the city enjoys full prosperity. And this will probably happen in 1000-years time." In spite of the controversy, it was decided to build the Funicular and the construction was completed in record time.

The construction of the Funicular was headed by the Tbilisi "Konki" governor, a Belgian engineer Alphons Robie who was a representative of the anonymous Belgian society. In 1896, Alphons Robie proposed the idea of building the Funicular. He presented his proposal to the city self-governance, requesting permission for laying the cable railroad.

In July 1900, the city municipal authorities signed the order for the construction of the Funicular in Tbilisi, thus approving the project of the Belgian engineer. The construction was to begin from the foot of the mountain where the city water reservoir was positioned and was to be completed at the mountain top, at the so-called "hermit’s head".

Pursuant to the agreement, the Belgian Anonymous Society was granted the right to operate the Funicular for a period of 45 years, and after the expiration of that period, they would give the rights to the city. The same document envisaged the construction of an electric railroad between Mtatsminda and the village of Kojori. In 1908, Alphons Robie obtained permission to lay the railroad from the Funicular upper station to Kojori. The contract was concluded, the appropriate funds were allocated, but due to various reasons, this project never materialized.

The construction of the Funicular began in September 1903. Many foreigners took part in its realization: the project was designed by a French engineer, A. Blanch and was architecturally elaborated by a Tbilisi architect, Alexander Shimkevich. Shimkevich was a famous architect, Polish by nationality. It was by his designs that the buildings of the Rustaveli Theatre, the Tbilisi Conservatory, the Supreme Court and numerous residential houses were built. The road construction was headed by a Belgian engineer, I.Ragoler, assisted by an Italian engineer, A. Fontana-Rossi, who was invited by the Belgian Anonymous Society. Antonio Fontana-Rossi died in 1905, soon after the completion of the Funicular. He was buried at Kukia cemetery. After her husband’s death, Mrs. Fontana-Rossi returned to her homeland. In June 1969 Delphina, Antonio Fontana-Rossi’s younger daughter who was born in Tbilisi, visited her father’s grave (M. Chorgolashvili. "Mtatsminda", 1979, p. 32).

With the permission of the city authorities the Funicular Society launched an electric tram from the Funicular lower station to Erevan Square (today’s Freedom Square) to link the city center with the Funicular and to carry passengers.

Niko Nikoladze, a renowned public figure of Georgia, had immensely contributed to the Funicular construction. It was on his initiative and active support that the concrete works were undertaken for the Funicular elevated railroad (the bridge-like structure on which the railroad runs).

The construction of the Funicular was basically finished by the end of 1904 (this date is also indicated on the Funicular rail tracks).

On 25 February 1905, the newspaper "Iveria" wrote: "Yesterday the Gubernia (Province) Technical Commission examined the Mtatsminda Funicular in the presence of the city engineers. The Commission commended the road leading to the top and the equipment thereof, having granted permission to launch the facility. According to the Commission, the carriage will take six minutes for ascent and descent. The Commission was also pleased with the machine-brakes designed to stop the carriage on its way from the top. After using the brakes, the carriage stopped immediately.

The carriage will accommodate 50 persons. The price of 20 kopecks for going up and coming down has also been set."

A special commission checked the technical side of the mountainous-cable railroad of the Funicular, its conditions of operation, and issued a permit for launching.
On 27 March 1905, at 10 in the morning, following a celebration, the Tbilisi Funicular was launched. At the opening ceremony, the Mamadaviti Church priest, N. Macharashvili, made a speech thanking the builders and the planners for bringing such a great work to a successful end. The mayor cut a blue ribbon and declared the road open.

Vaso Kvavilashvili, the first locomotive-driver of the Funicular recalls: "At first people feared that the rope might break and they did not want to climb into the carriage. People were brought in coaches, were paid money, and were urged not to be afraid and to get into the carriage. Later, when people got used to the railroad, there was a long line for tickets."

Opening of the Funicular was a special event in the life of our capital. The community expressed enormous satisfaction and joy in connection with this event. Niko Pirosmanishvili dedicated a wonderful painting commemorating the event. Dimitri Ermakov, a renowned photo-artist, took photos of the old Funicular, preserving them for the future generations (they showed the interior and exterior of the Funicular, machines and equipment, and the beauties of the Mtatsminda panorama).
Four-thousand rubles were spent on the Funicular construction. The length of the road is 501 meters. The sloping angle of the railroad line - 28-33 degrees. At the very beginning, the carriage was made up of three compartments which could accommodate eight passengers each. The carriage had two platforms for 24 passengers. Subsequently, these two platforms were transformed into compartments and long benches were installed. The weight of a carriage was up to 250 poods (4,000 kilograms) each. In the middle of the road, there was a special platform arranged for the carriages to let them pass each other on their way. From here, the passengers could access the Mtatsminda Pantheon.

The upper station of the Funicular is at an altitude of 727 meters above sea level and the lower station – at 460 meters.

The first reconstruction of the Funicular took place in 1936-1938. Instead of the old station a new, three-storey building was built – the one that our generation still remembers for its grandeur and beauty.

In 1937, a wide highway was built to go up Mtatsminda Mountain. The highway branched off from the Kojori road and ran across Okrokana.

The second reconstruction of the Funicular took place in 1968-1969. This time, a new building was built at the lower station to replace the old one and the carriages were modified. The Tbilisi State Art Academy presented an original structural model for the new carriages. The square providing access to the Funicular was expanded.

The number of the population of the capital and that of the tourists visiting the city was growing rapidly and the mountain’s cable car (the funicular) could no longer meet the emerging requirements. Therefore, it was decided to build an aerial cable car as well.

In 1958, in connection with the 1500th anniversary of the capital, construction of the first aerial cable car in Georgia began. It was launched in October of the same year and for a long time made the Tbilisi residents and visitors very happy. And then… You know yourselves what happened later.

Today "a different" and most beautiful structure of the cable car - the Funicular building, that has become a Tbilisi symbol and is so dear to the hearts of all of the Tbilisi dwellers is again waiting for the restorer and supporter. And so is the beautiful Mtatsminda Park.

From January 1, 1957, a television tower was erected on the Mount of Mtatsminda. At this very place, the first Georgian television studio was launched. In the beginning, the Tbilisian residents could not get used to the strange structure erected on Mamadaviti Mountain. Probably, just like the French at the time of construction of the Eiffel Tower.

A French botanist, Emil Levie wrote this about Tbilisi: "In the evenings, the city is a wonderful sight from the top. I feel as if I am looking at Paris from the top of the Eiffel Tower".

The Funicular Railway underwent several reconstructions.

In 2000 it had an accident after hauling rope broke and one of the carriages slammed into lower station injuring some tourists from Japan, funicular closed down for 12 years, until being replaced in 2012 with modern equipment and carriages and complete reconstruction by Doppelmayr Garaventa Group.

The Funicular is a great way to get to Mtatsminda Park. The restored station is in Chonkadze Street and the cost for a return journey is currently 2 GEL.






CABLE CARS (AERIAL TRAMWAYS) (1958 - present)

Since 1958 to 1986 nine aerial tramways were constructed in Tbilisi and all have been abandoned in 90th, except the one on Turtle Lake which has been abandoned in 2009 but as of September 2016 is completely reconstructed and full in service. One of the tramways had a worldwide known accident in 1990 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1990_T...amway_accident and after 27 years out of service as of September 2016 is under reconstruction. Currently Tbilisi has 2 ropeways on of them was constructed by Leitner Ropeways in 2012.









BUS (1933 - present)

The bus system currently consists of 97 lines.




MINIBUS (MARSHUTKA)

The minibus system currently consists of 99 lines.




TRAMWAY (1883 - 2006)

The Tbilisi tramway network operated in the Georgian capital city of Tbilisi between 1883 and 2006. In 1986 it extended to 105 km (65 miles) of (single) track covering 12 different routes.

The tram service was opened in April 1883, using horse traction. It was electrified between June 1904 and August 1905, and the system, which had originally been established as a private enterprise, was taken over by the municipality in 1915. The original metre gauge track was replaced between 1933 and 1942 with a broad gauge,[1] which corresponded with the Soviet standard.

The early post-war period saw further expansion, with the extent of the network reaching 105 km (65 miles), and up to 300 tramcars in use. Lately the system used RWZ-6 tramcars from the Rīga Train and Tram Works and Russian KTM-5s. However, after the 1960s the city's tram network declined and contracted, faced by competition from the new Tbilisi Metro and a shortage of available cash for investment and infrastructure maintenance. While tram lines in downtown were one by one dismantled the network expanded in newly built suburbs till 1986. By 2000 only 8 tramlines were operating, which was down to 2 lines by 2003. By 2005 just one line (Route 12) was operating, and this remained in service till near the end of 2006.

On 4 December 2006 tram system (only remaining line number 12) was closed, most of the remaining Tbilisi tram rails were removed in few years.








TROLLEYBUS (1937 - 2006)

Trolleybus appeared in Tbilisi in 1937, the decision on its operation and routes had been made as early as 1934 together with the preparation of first Tbilisi general plan. The length of trolleybus line was 15 km in first year and to the end of Soviet Union it accounted for 95 km. The fact was accompanied by the growth of number of trolleybuses. Total share of trolleybuses in terms of transportation of passengers has never exceeded 20%, it is noteworthy that trolleybus mostly rivaled with tram, as result, tram was driven out by trolleybus from the central streets of Tbilisi. Operation of trolleybuses ceased on 4 December 2006.







METRO, BUS, FUNICULAR § AERIAL TRAMWAY MAP for 2015 (Click on image to enlarge)



Last edited by Tramwayman; September 11th, 2016 at 08:40 AM.
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Old January 5th, 2011, 01:12 PM   #2
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hello everybody! these seems to be a new thread! )))) bravo tramwayman )))
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Old January 5th, 2011, 01:19 PM   #3
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i think we have to work more with the tbilisi authorities! they will give us all the infos concerning the new Tram Projects in Tbilisi! we can do it via mail i think, this will give also an impuls for Investors looking for this city to invest!

all the best to this new Thread!
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Old January 5th, 2011, 02:35 PM   #4
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Tblisi used to have a tram network, which was closed down between 2004 and 2006.
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Old January 5th, 2011, 02:35 PM   #5
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There is also a project to replace all the "marshutkas" with new Comfortable mini buses in tbilisi.
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Old January 5th, 2011, 08:12 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gag Halfrunt View Post
Tblisi used to have a tram network, which was closed down between 2004 and 2006.
Yes Tbilisi had tra and trolleybus network and both were closed on 4 december of 2006.

there was only 2 trolley lines and 1 tram line left from a mighty network when it was flourishing.

Now it's new era and Tbilisi wants new modern tram system.
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Old January 6th, 2011, 04:22 AM   #7
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Great news Tramwayman!

But of course you will have French trams!
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Old January 6th, 2011, 07:02 AM   #8
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Great news Tramwayman!

But of course you will have French trams!
Or they could go for the Spanish or (god forbid) Italian trams.
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Old January 6th, 2011, 11:44 AM   #9
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Is that a map of Middle-Earth?
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Old January 6th, 2011, 02:36 PM   #10
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Great news Tramwayman!

But of course you will have French trams!
I don't really know what trams we will have it's early to talk about this now.

I hope for that time in 2012 when Tbilisi has to order tram vehicles there will be Citadis trams with rotating bogies otherwise Tbilisi will say big "NO" to French Alstom.

And we will go for Skoda 15T or it's superior hahaha.

Tram vehicles for Tbilis need to negotiate at least 18 meters of curves and be able to climb 10-11% inclines.
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Old January 6th, 2011, 03:00 PM   #11
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I hope for that time in 2012 when Tbilisi has to order tram vehicles there will be Citadis trams with rotating bogies otherwise Tbilisi will say big "NO" to French Alstom.
French consortium = French trams. Napoleon is not dead yet. Fortunately for you Alstom is developing the X04 with rotating bogies.

Quote:
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Tram vehicles for Tbilis need to negotiate at least 18 meters of curves and be able to climb 10-11% inclines.
You don't need a tram you need an Abrams tank!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alargule View Post
Is that a map of Middle-Earth?
Yes, didn't you know it's in Tbilisi?
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Old January 6th, 2011, 09:11 PM   #12
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Quote:
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French consortium = French trams. Napoleon is not dead yet. Fortunately for you Alstom is developing the X04 with rotating bogies.


You don't need a tram you need an Abrams tank!


Yes, didn't you know it's in Tbilisi?
Russian trams handle 13% on inclines new ones and the ones that ran in my city, they negotiate 15 m radius turns.

Now new modern trams can be maid with rotating bogies with turns donw to 15 m (Skoda 15T can do this).

But they need to go up to 10-11% inclines the most.

Bombardier Flexity Outlook made for Augsburg goes up to 11% inclines 7 section unidirectional low floor. but with fixed bogies.

Alstom Citadis X04 has high floor whre the bogies are we need 100% low floor tram.

The fact that Systra makes pre-project works and Alstom could do the infrastructure doesn't meand that trams must be Citadis.

If Citadis trams can't afford the parameters we want Alstom can do nothing they will be left out of order jajaja.
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Old January 7th, 2011, 07:03 AM   #13
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Alstom Citadis X04 has high floor whre the bogies are we need 100% low floor tram.
The floor is high where the bogies are, true, but it is ramped without steps which meets the technical definition of low floor. Just stating a fact, not advocating it. Naturally I prefer the Skoda which has a true flat floor and all seats on the level floor, not on high platforms over the bogies.
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Old January 7th, 2011, 01:32 PM   #14
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The floor is high where the bogies are, true, but it is ramped without steps which meets the technical definition of low floor. Just stating a fact, not advocating it. Naturally I prefer the Skoda which has a true flat floor and all seats on the level floor, not on high platforms over the bogies.
That's exactly what I'm saying, I like more Skoda, but well I like Citadis unique design for each city but not the X04.

Let's see first we need a project and then there'll be tender for supplying tram vehicles and constructing tram network (which automatically Alstom should do) but let's see.
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Old January 7th, 2011, 11:26 PM   #15
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How much will this new tram network replicate the old tram network?
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Old January 8th, 2011, 12:09 AM   #16
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How much will this new tram network replicate the old tram network?
Well it will, cause in Tbilisi trams were everywhere with it's huge history from 1883 to 2006.

You know with this huge history trams were in almost every part of the city on almost every street main or not main.

Firstly trams of course were constructed in city centre and spreaded, after that buses and trolleybuses implemented trams were shut donw on some central streets slowly slowly shutting down but opening in new and more and more suburbs so the amount of kilometers was not changing.

(Shutting down trams lines on more and more streets in centre and opening and making more longer in suburbs), this continued till 1974 when tram system was divided onto two parts because of metro. But the construction of new lines kept until 1986 after that from 1989 started deep crysis and closures of lines and in 2004 there was only line number 12 left, which was closed on 4 december of 2006.

This is how the lines looked from 1986 to 1989.
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Old January 9th, 2011, 12:39 AM   #17
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Tramwayman ხომ გეუბნებოდი რომ ოპტიმისტი უნდა იყო მეთქი, არ გითხარი მოიცადე და მაგ შენს ტრამვაის ხაზებსაც გაიყვანებე მეთქი??? მაგრამ შენ მიმიტკიცებდი ყველაფერი გაანადგურესო და არც არაფერს გააკეთებენო. ამიტომიყავი ოპტიმისტი და მინდა მოგილოცო ეს ფაქტი, რადგან ვიცი გაგიხარდა ეს ამბავი
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you are in the alpine meadows above"
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Old January 9th, 2011, 03:04 PM   #18
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So, do you mean that Tbilisi, which has closed its tram system in 2006, are now thinking returning tram?

The 6th post says it still has one tram line, but www.lrta.org says that all tramlines has closed in 2006, which is true?
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Old January 9th, 2011, 03:43 PM   #19
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Quote:
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Tramwayman ხომ გეუბნებოდი რომ ოპტიმისტი უნდა იყო მეთქი, არ გითხარი მოიცადე და მაგ შენს ტრამვაის ხაზებსაც გაიყვანებე მეთქი??? მაგრამ შენ მიმიტკიცებდი ყველაფერი გაანადგურესო და არც არაფერს გააკეთებენო. ამიტომიყავი ოპტიმისტი და მინდა მოგილოცო ეს ფაქტი, რადგან ვიცი გაგიხარდა ეს ამბავი
mec var chartuli saqmeshi.

gaaketebn tu ara jer sakitxavia. is faqti rom winasaproeqto samushaoebi daiwyes arafers nishanvs absoluturad.
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Old January 9th, 2011, 03:44 PM   #20
Tramwayman
Trams the Best!!!
 
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Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Tbilisi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashis Mitra View Post
So, do you mean that Tbilisi, which has closed its tram system in 2006, are now thinking returning tram?

The 6th post says it still has one tram line, but www.lrta.org says that all tramlines has closed in 2006, which is true?
Tbilisi has closed the only tram line left in 2006 4 december.

The 6th post says that Tbilisi had 1 tram line and 2 trolleylines when closing.

My uncle was a tram driver till the end of tram.
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