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Old January 22nd, 2011, 04:47 PM   #1
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Tamilnadu - Healthcare, Public Health and Medical Tourism

Tamilnadu is known for its healthcare since prehistoric times. Siddha medicine system was developed in Tamilnadu thousands of years ago and its literature predates almost all forms of medicine practiced around the world. Allopathy or modern medicine was introduced by the British and one of India's oldest medical colleges, Madras Medical College started functioning 176 years ago in 1835.

Tamilnadu has enjoyed the preeminent position for health care in India and continue to do so. It has produced such stalwarts like Dr. A.L.Mudaliar, Dr. Muthulakshmi Reddy, Dr. Mary Scharlieb, Dr. C.Natesa Mudaliar, Dr. Balasubramaniam Ramamurthi, Dr. S.S.Badrinath, Dr. Govindappa Venkataswamy, Dr. K.M.Cherian, Dr. Lakshmi Sahgal, Dr. Vilayanur S. Ramachandran, Dr. Prathap C. Reddy, Dr. T. Thomas among others.

The public health system is among the best in the country. It is either the best performing or second best performing state (usually behind Kerala) in critical parameters such as infant mortality rate, maternal mortality rate, antenatal coverage, total fertility rate, net reproduction rate, life expectancy and PHC coverage.

Tamilnadu also hosts some of the finest medical centres and research institutes in India and is a hub of medical tourism as can be evident from the following article ranking the best hospitals in India which shows TN dominating in almost all categories.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raji7373 View Post


The cities of Chennai, Vellore, Coimbatore and Madurai offers exceptional medical care and the state with 6% of Indian population takes care of 50% of inbound foreign medical tourists. Not only foreign medical tourists but the state also acts as a hub of domestic medical activity.
So it is only reasonable that this important part of the economy and education has a separate thread. Please post any news regarding TN's and Pondicherry's healthcare, public health and medical tourism in this thread.

Tamilnadu government ministry of health and family welfare
Official TN medical tourism website with the list of approved hospitals
Tamilnadu government policy note 2010 - 11 including all health related statistics for the state of Tamilnadu
Body donation form (Please spread the word).
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Last edited by TShyam; January 22nd, 2011 at 08:35 PM.
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Old January 22nd, 2011, 04:51 PM   #2
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Tashkent girl gets a new lease of life


Kamola (centre) from Uzbekistan with Medical Director of Vedanayagam Hospital S.V.Kandasami (left) and consultant urologist Ganesh Gopalakrishnan (right) at the hospital on Tuesday. Standing behind are her parents Manzura and Sharaffudin. Photo: S.Siva Saravanan

Quote:
Fifteen-year-old Kamola is eager to get back home with fond memories of the friends she and her parents found and the soft idlis they relished at the canteen of Vedanayagam Hospital here.

Kamola will be leaving for Uzbekistan capital Tashkent in a couple of days with an enhanced bladder created by urologists S.V. Kandasami and Ganesh Gopalakrishnan to stop urine reflux to her kidneys, a problem she has battled since birth.

A lot of trauma

She wants to catch up with lost time in academics and learn swimming. She went to school all these years with tubes from both kidneys draining urine into two plastic bottles.

In between classes, she had to go to the restroom to empty the bottles.

“We went through a lot of trauma because of this. Fellow passengers in buses complained of smell. They stayed away from her. Though school mates and teachers were very understanding, at times they too indicated discomfort. But my daughter's determination made her carry on,” said Sharaffudin, Kamola's father. He is a manager in a company that manufactures heating systems.

Ms. Kamola underwent five surgeries on her bladder in Tashkent to correct a congenital problem that caused urine to flow back into the kidneys.

“From birth, she did not have the sub mucosal tunnel in the bladder through which urine flowed,” the urologists said.

Surgeons in Tashkent tried to create the tunnel. But the repeated operations reduced the size of the bladder. The problem worsened as the bladder could hold only 30 ml of urine, against the normal capacity of 350 ml, Dr. Kandasami said.

This led to the tubes being inserted into the kidneys from a little above the waist to drain urine.

Dr. Kandasami, who is the Medical Director of the hospital, said that in a 10-hour surgery, a portion of the big intestine and the small intestine were cut to form a pouch, and this was stitched to the original bladder in order to create more space to hold urine.

“Now, she has normal functioning of the bladder. Fortunately, her kidneys have not been damaged, though the prolonged use of tubes led to stone formation. We removed the stones,” he said.

Kamola's mother Manzura said their biggest problem was solved. “Now, my daughter can lead a normal life.”

Wait for a year

Through a friend in Tashkent, Mr. Sharaffudin came to know last year about the Vedanayagam Hospital and that Dr. Gopalakrishnan (then president of the Urology Society of India) was working there after retiring from the Christian Medical College in Vellore, where he had performed many such surgeries.

“The father and daughter came to us last year [January 2010] and returned to Tashkent after a consultation. The entire family returned in December so that the girl could be operated upon,” Dr. Gopalakrishnan said.

Kamola underwent the first surgery when she was two years old and all the five were done by the time she was four. “Now, when I get back home, I just want to study,” she says.
http://www.thehindu.com/health/article1100261.ece
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Old January 22nd, 2011, 05:35 PM   #3
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Nice thread
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Old January 22nd, 2011, 07:25 PM   #4
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Biodegradable stents to prevent blocks in heart

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CHENNAI: Cardiologists in Chennai have implanted a drug-coated absorbable stent that would dissolve in the body within two years. The biodegradable stent, which is in the last phase of clinical trials, can make scarred blood vessels appear and function like normal ones. Doctors who did the implant will make a formal announcement in Chennai at 3 pm on Tuesday.

A team headed interventional cardiologist Dr Mathew Samuel Kalarickal and Dr Sai Satish at the Apollo Hospitals, Chennai implanted the stent in two patients a fortnight ago as a part of the last phase of the human trials. The doctors TOI on Tuesday that if the clinical trials show expected results, these stents could soon replace the existing ones which are non-biodegradable.

The drug-coated absorbable stent, manufactured by Abbott Laboratories, is left behind in the arteries after doctors clear the blocks in the blood vessel using balloon angioplasty. Unlike the metal-mesh or drug coated metals, these stents are designed to be absorbed slowly by the coronary arteries. "In two years, these stents will be gone. It seems effective at keeping arteries open and reducing chances of relapse or heart surgeries. Studies so far have also shown that arteries that were once scarred look near normal after two years," said Dr Satish.

The new stent is yet to be available in the commercial market. As a part of the clinical trial, more than 100 institutes all the over the world including five centres in India will implant the stent on patients, free of cost. The Indian hospitals involved in the trial include Apollo Hospitals and Madras Medical Mission in Chennai, Escorts Heart Research Institute in Delhi, Care Hospital in Hyderabad and SAL Hospital in Ahmedabad.
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/h...ow/7310863.cms
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Old January 22nd, 2011, 07:27 PM   #5
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TN plans to set up one medical college in each district

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The Tamil Nadu Government has drawn up a plan to set up at least one medical college in each district of the state and to establish a State Medical Services Corporation and drug warehouses in all districts that provide quality drugs free of cost, a top official said.
"Tamil Nadu now has the highest number of medical colleges in government sector with 15 medical colleges, contributing to human resource development in medical, nursing and paramedical disciplines," State Health and Family Welfare Principal Secretary V K Subburaj told PTI.
He said the policy of one medical college per district proposed by the State Government is a milestone in the history of medicine in Tamil Nadu.
The State Government would encourage private trusts to start courses such as dental, BSc nursing and diploma in nursing courses in rural areas, he said.
"Government has given permission to start ten nursing schools and ten nursing colleges to conduct BSc nursing courses," he said.
Subburaj said government hospitals with medical colleges would be upgraded on par with international standards.
"Apart from this, all government hospitals will also be accredited by the National Accreditation Board for Hospitals and Healthcare Providers (NABH), a constituent board of Quality Council of India (QCI), set up to establish and operate accreditation programme for healthcare organisations."
"Currently, two government hospitals in the state have been accredited by NABH," he said.
Stating that all Primary Health Centres in the state would also be accredited by NABH, he said at present 48 PHCs have applied for accreditation.
"NABH standards have more than 500 objective elements and about 70 per cent of these elements concern clinical practices and the rest focus on managerial functions," he said.
"The department is also encouraging public-private partnership to improve services of PHCs and government hospitals," he said.
In the last four years, 6,300 medical officers, 7,242 staff nurses, 1,282 village health nurses and more than 9,000 para medical staff had been appointed in various government hospitals, he said.
http://news.in.msn.com/national/arti...mentid=4635852
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Old January 22nd, 2011, 07:29 PM   #6
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Government to start medical colleges in Pudukottai, Virudhunagar districts

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The State government will make all-out efforts to contain the rise in prices of essential commodities, Deputy Chief Minister M. K. Stalin told the Assembly on Thursday.

Concluding the debate on Governor's address, Mr. Stalin said the problem of price rise was prevalent not just in the State or in the country but also at the international level.

Giving an exhaustive account of the government's measures, he referred to the provision of rice at Re. 1 a kg besides pulses, edible oil and condiments at concessional rates. Stating that the government had been taking steps to enhance the purchasing capacity of people, he said that wages to the tune of Rs. 1,847 crore were, so far, paid in the State during 2010-2011 under the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme, which was being implemented by Central and State governments.
http://www.thehindu.com/news/states/...cle1090351.ece
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Old January 22nd, 2011, 07:33 PM   #7
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‘Tamil Nadu preferred destination for medical tourism’


Health Minister M. R. K. Paneerselvam and Transport Minister K. N. Nehru (right) looking at the newly installed digital X-ray machine at Annal Gandhi Memorial Government Hospital in Tiruchi on Thursday. Photo: M. Moorthy

Quote:
Tamil Nadu has emerged as the preferred destination for medical tourism in the country, with the government prioritising the improvement of health care services in the State, said Health Minister M. R. K. Paneerselvam in Tiruchi on Thursday.

The State government has been upgrading facilities in government hospitals on par with private hospitals to extend top class health care. Expensive liver and heart transplant surgeries were now being performed at the Stanley and the Madras medical college hospitals free of cost.

Tamil Nadu is now being looked up to for its affordable and quality health care services and even foreigners were coming here for treatments, Mr. Paneerselvam observed, speaking at a function to mark the inauguration of a digital X-ray unit and the renovated neo natal ward at the Annal Gandhi Government Hospital attached to the K. A. P. Viswanatham Government Medical College in the city.

The government has sanctioned Rs. 600 crore for purchase of equipment in government hospitals. It has sanctioned the establishment of digital X-ray units in 40 medical college and government hospitals in the State. Ten have already been established and the remaining would start functioning soon.

The government has also decided to set up neo natal wards in all district headquarter hospitals and the first was opened in Tiruchi on Thursday. Construction was underway in the hospitals, and the wards would start functioning in 10 district hospitals next month. Similarly, all district headquarter government hospitals would also be provided with MRI scans and the equipment has been provided to government medical college hospitals already.

Prompt measures undertaken by the government to control the spread of diseases such as the AH1N1 influenza ensured that the State stood in the forefront in preventing loss of human lives due to such new diseases.

Appealing to government doctors and para-medics to discharge their duties sincerely and efficiently, Mr. Paneerselvam reminded the doctors that the DMK government had enacted the Hospital Protection Act to protect their interests. The salaries of government doctors and stipend of house surgeons have also been increased by the government, he said.

Transport Minister K. N. Nehru, District Collector Mahesan Kasirajan, MLAs Anbil Periyasamy, K. N. Sekaran and A. Soundarapandian, Mayor S. Sujatha, District Panchayat Council Chairperson V. Sangeetha, Corporation Commissioner T. T. Balsamy, and Dean of K. A. P. Viswanatham Government Medical College A.Karthikeyan were present.

Rs. 50 crore for Tiruchi medical college hospital

The Annal Gandhi Government Hospital would be upgraded soon and Rs. 50 crore would be sanctioned in the first phase for infrastructure development at the hospital, the Health Minister announced here on Thursday.

A new six-storey building would be built utilising the first instalment of funds. Ten super-speciality wards, each with 30 beds, would be established at the new building, which would have a total floor area of about 8,000 square metres, Mr. Paneerselvam said.

The Minister’s announcement comes in the wake of long pending demand from the city residents for upgrading the hospital, which turned into a public movement after a project to upgrade the hospital on par with the All India Institute of Medical Sciences by the Union government was mooted a few years back.

Transport Minister K. N. Nehru, who represents the Tiruchi II Assembly segment, indicated that the new building would be located in the medical college campus at Periya Milaguparai in the city.

Neo natal ward

The digital X-ray unit at the hospital has been set up at a cost of Rs.1 crore and Rs.12.12 lakhs has been spent for the renovated neo natal ward. About Rs. 25 lakhs worth of equipment are to be provided to the neo natal ward. The establishment of the 24x7 neo natal ward was intended to bring down the mortality rate of newborns.
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Old January 22nd, 2011, 07:37 PM   #8
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Tamil Nadu to focus on medical tourism


Union Minister for Health & Family Welfare, Ghulam Nabi Azad (C) flanked by Suneeta Reddy, Executive Director-Finance-Apollo Hospitals Enterprises Ltd and Well known Cardiac Surgeon and CMD, Medanta-The Medicity Dr. Naresh Trehan during "7th India Health Summit 2010-Healthcare 3.0", in New Delhi December 2, 2010.Photo: Rajeev Bhatt


Quote:
As part of efforts to promote medical tourism, the Tamil Nadu government is planning to bring out tourism brochures in consultation with medical institutions with some useful tips on health care.

Citing the “availability of super speciality hospitals in the State, providing quality services affordable cost,” the State would adopt the strategy to achieve its primary objective of making Tamil Nadu a favoured domestic and international tourist destination, according to a report of the State’s eleventh five year plan.

A slew of good hospitals are located across Tamil Nadu, with patients, especially from the Middle East, Pakistan and some African countries, thronging the state for medical services.

The Tourism department staff will be specifically trained to attend to the needs of the people, it said.

Chennai, for instance, boasts of some of the big names in India like Apollo Hospitals and Harvey Super Speciality, with local players such as Aravind Eye Care and PSG Hospitals in Madurai and Coimbatore respectively remaining popular.

Further, publicising and marketing festivals such as Pongal and dance festivals at Mahabalipuram and Chidambaram are also part of the strategy to achieve the said objective, it said.

The harvest festival `Pongal’ (in January) could well assume more significance as the Tamil Nadu government recently rescheduled the Tamil calendar, announcing that Pongal will mark the birth of the Tamil new year.

Chief Minister M Karunanidhi had urged people of the State to celebrate the festival with pomp and fervour, as it would henceforth coincide with the new year too.

The Tourism department was also considering roping private and corporate players and oil companies for developing some areas like Golf clubs, adventure tourism, cruises, star hotels and heli-taxi, among others.
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Old January 22nd, 2011, 07:40 PM   #9
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Cross posting from Cbe thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CBE-SINGAKUTTY View Post
430 CRORE MEDICAL COLLEGE TO START IN 2012 IN E.S.I
Fully air conditioned state of art ESI hospital to come up at Varadharajapuram.
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Old January 22nd, 2011, 09:00 PM   #10
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Medical Tourism: Oppurtunities and Challenges in Tamilnadu - Dr. Annamalai Murugan*

*Lecturer in Tourism Management, Tagore Government Arts College, Pondicherry. murugan_33@hotmail.com

This is an excerpt from a research paper written by Dr. A.Murugan presented at the Conference on Tourism in India – Challenges Ahead, 15-17 May 2008, IIM Kozhikode

Quote:
Medical Tourism in Tamil Nadu
Envisioning the potential of medical tourism in the state. Tamil Nadu has come a long way in carving a niche for itself in this field. Today, medical tourism in India is synonymous with Tamil Nadu, and Chennai, Vellore, Madurai and Coimbatore have a stellar role to play in the burgeoning medical tourism industry. Tamil Nadu is a pioneer in providing the best healthcare. Ultra-modern corporate hospitals, talented medical professionals, and battalions of paramedics and the best practices of Government hospitals the states, have attracted people to the state to receive excellent treatment, convalesce in enchanting locals, and recuperate swiftly. Hospitals in Tamil Nadu cater to the treatment of various disease, like MIOT for orthopaedics (joint and bones) and traumatology, Shankar Netralaya for ophthalmology (eye procedures); Christian medical college for open-heart surgery; Madras Medical Mission for heart surgery; Kovai Medical Centre and Hospital for arthroscopicm Laparoscopic and thoracoscopic surgeries. Apollo for hip and total-knee replacement, liver, multi-organ and cord blood transplants, to name a few. The government medical college- Stanely Medical College – is well known for its gastrointestinal procedures. Also the Government-led General Hospital is well known for providing services for up to 7,000 in patients. The investment in public sector hospitals is substantial, which they are able to offer state-of-the- art operation theatres and technology at cost-effective prices. Healthcare in Tamil Nadu has earned a good reputation in the country because both the private as well as the government hospitals are so professionally run. With almost all government-run and private hospitals introducing newer technologies and better services in the healthcare sector, it has fallen upon the medical sector to benchmark medical standards in the country.

In fact, the Tamil Nadu Medical Services Corporation has an excellent tract record for its streamlined processes for the distribution of drugs. The all- computerised system of the corporation allows the procurement to be 25-30 per cent less than the market rate. The quality, too, is ensured, as private
laboratories test every batch of medicines independently. The system is totally supportive and foolproof, which is how it is able to leverage competitive rates. As a result, all government hospitals are free from the hassle of procurement of drugs and equipment. In a bid to promote medical tourism, the government has identified 25 city hospitals to help showcase
medical tourism as well as inaugurated an exclusive Medical Tourism Desk at the Tamil Nadu Tourism Complex. The medical tourism desk would be manned by trained hospital staff to help tap the vast potential of medical tourism.

Further, Indonesia is showing interest in medical tourism initiatives of Tamil Nadu Government and has requested Tamil Nadu Tourism to organise a Medical Tourism Fair with participation from super speciality hospitals of the state at Jakarta. The request was put forward during the four-day Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA) Travel Mart held at Bali, where Tamil Nadu Tourism had a stall at the Incredible India pavilion. The Government of India is so taken with this high level of competence that it would like the other states to emulate the Tamil Nadu model.

Some of Tamilnadu’s most reputed Multi specialty Hospitals and Health Care Centre
Hospitals Website

1. Lifeline Multi Specialty Hospital, Chennai www.lifeline-hospital.com
2. Spot Hospital, Chennai www.spothospital.com
3. Cholayil Sanjeevanam, Chennai www.cholayilsanjeevanam.com
4. Rajan Eye Care Hospital, Chennai http://lasikpavilion.com
5. Prasanth Multispeciality Hospital, Chennai www.pfrcivf.com

Some of Tamilnadu’s most reputed Health care facilities:
1. Apollo Hospital, Chennai
2. Sri Ramachandra Medical Centre (SRMC), Chennai
3. Madras Medical Mission, Chennai
4. M.V. Diabetes Speciality Centre (MVDSC), Chennai
5. MIOT Hospitals, Chennai
6. Sankara Nethralaya, Chennai
7. Frontier Lifeline, Chennai
8. Dr. Aggarwal’s Eye Hospital, Chennai
9. Vijaya Hospital, Chennai
10. Dr. Mehtas Hospital, Chennai
11. Solace Meditour Private Limited
12. Ayush Therapy Centre
13. K.G. Hospital, Coimbatore
14. Kovai Medical Centre and Hospital, Coimbatore
15. Ganga Hospital, Coimbatore
16. PSG Hospitals, Coimbatore
17. CMC, Vellore
18. Gandhiji Nature Cure Centre, Elagiri & Chennai
Source: Tamil Nadu Tourism News letter.

5.1. The Wining mix for Health Tourism Ingredients for success
Beyond the professionalism and technical expertise of medical staff or Travel agencies and Tour operators, the range of high quality healthcare and medical care products and services available at highly affordable prices and value for money, there are several other pluses that add to the attractiveness of the destination as a health tourism centre.

5.2. Tamil Nadu’s winning marketing mix includes
  • A welcoming destination with an appreciation of the needs of different cultures and the availability of support services to serve diverse needs.
  • Service Quality - Par Excellence with International Standard.
  • Tamilnaduness and Enchanting Tamil Nadu traditions: Patients and users of other hospitals and allied services are welcomed as “guests”. Gracious and courteous reception is characteristic of traditional Tamil Nadu hospitality
  • Destination diversity Tamil Nadu offers a myriad of enjoyable ways in which one can achieve a speedy recovery. Take life at a more leisurely pace at any of the hundred of Temples around Tamil Nadu enjoying the fresh mountain air or sun, sea and sand. Or simply indulge on a diet of delicious Tamil Nadu cuisines and health-restoring rejuvenating herbal therapies offered by Tamil Nadu resorts combined with mesmerising massage. Recuperating has never been more pleasurable.
  • Attractive prices. Value for money, Guests and visitors are of the view that Tamil Nadu Medical Tourism offers value for money. There is no doubt that visitors seeking treatment in Tamil Nadu get more for only a fraction of what it costs back home leaving them with extra to spend on their favorite leisurely pursuits such as sight-seeing, shopping, Pilgrimage, Hill resorts, Sandy beaches and beauty treatments, and other treats.

5.3. State Involvement and Implications
It has to be done in Five major ways. First, tax incentives should be given to support the growth of healthcare corporations. Second, creating institutional infrastructure for upholding standards and quality – the accreditation system, standardization guidelines, fee packaging guidelines, etc. And third, the Tamil Nadu Tourism should directly lead in the marketing of medical tourism overseas through trade missions and other promotional event activities. Fourth,Travel agencies and Tour Operators Co-ordination as selling the Brand of TamilNadu as Prime Medical Tourism Destination and Fifth, as forming Core Committee of Medical experts with field specialist to study the lacunae in enhancing the commodity of healthcare Internationally.

5.4. Additional FSI for hospitals will bring down healthcare cost in Medical Tourism in Tamil Nadu:
"The Government of Tamil Nadu should hike the Floor Space Index (FSI) for hospitals and healthcare institutions from the current 1.5 to 5 to bring down the rising healthcare cost, increase number of beds and healthcare talent pool of the State," "The relaxation in FSI will allow hospitals and institutions create more infrastructure in the same premises. They do not have to invest as much as 40-50% of the project cost in acquiring new lands. Instead they can invest directly in healthcare equipments or human resources and
reduce healthcare cost,"

In a press release issued by CII , the increasing land prices in the State means that the land cost constitutes about 40-50% of a hospital project and with low FSI, hospitals are not able to increase beds in the same premises. They are not able to keep the healthcare cost at affordable level, when they acquire land to increase the number of beds. At present, there is only one bed for 1,100 people in Tamil Nadu, whereas the World Health Organisation recommends at least 1:500 ratio. The additional FSI of 5, as in Mumbai, would increase the number of hospital beds by approximately 20-30 %. FSI in Delhi and Karnataka is 3, as compared to just 1.5 in Tamil Nadu.

FSI should be same across the State to benefit especially the small 20-bed hospitals - "the frontline brigade in the battlefield for saving lives of people in need of emergency treatment". These small hospitals constitute 80% of the total healthcare services provided in the State. At national level, India needs to double its bed strength of 7 lakhs to meet the WHO recommendation of 1 bed for 500 people. As the country adds 25 million children every year, India needs to invest Rs. 80,000 crore to create one lakh additional beds every year for the next 20 years, he said. In comparison, Japan has one bed for 90 people, while Russia and Western nations have one bed for 110 and 250 people respectively.

"We cannot import healthcare like cement or steel. Hence, we have to improve our healthcare infrastructure on war footing."
The Government should provide healthcare sector incentives that are equal to those provided to the IT sector, as healthcare has the potential to create employment opportunities five to ten times more than what the IT industry can do. The healthcare sector has the potential to increase its direct employment from 4 million to 30 million and generate an equal number of indirect employment opportunities. Healthcare is also a major foreign exchange earner with the inevitable growth of medical tourism. "In addition to that, over 10% of Indian medical professionals - including paramedical staff, who are working abroad, send, home about 60% of their earnings,"

There is acute manpower shortage in the people-intensive healthcare industry. Tamil Nadu produces 2000 doctors a year and for every doctor, there is a need for 5 Para medical staff - the State alone needs to produce 10,000 nurses per year. India has about 7 lakh doctors and 1.1 million nurses but the country needs at least 17 lakh doctors and 37 lakh paramedical staffs to meet the local demand. Manufacturing sector continues to downsize but hospitals world over continue to generate more employment. At US$ 3 trillion, it is one of the largest sectors of world economy. Other States to follow the healthcare model of Andhra Pradesh, which intends to cover 5 crore people - over 80% of its population - with its new universal healthcare scheme, Arogya Sree. AP too has a very liberal FSI to increase its healthcare infrastructure.

5.5. Challenges to the Industry
Tamil Nadu is emerging as an attractive, affordable destination for healthcare But there are some challenges that the country has to overcome to become a tourist destination with competent health care industry:

A. Infrastructural facilities
  • Roads
  • Sanitation
  • Power Backups
  • Rest/ Guest Houses
  • Public Utility Services

B. The Foreign Customer Concerns and Expectations:
The biggest challenge that the Indian hospitals face is assuring the foreign patients that they will receive quality care with no hidden costs. The industry experts need to develop the decision making models through a thorough study on the factors that motivate the patients to choose India as a health care solution spot.

The basic expectations that the industry feels are important to be concerned about are:
  • Hygiene
  • Staff ( trained technically as well as in soft skills)
  • Customization
  • Insurance Cover
  • Stability
  • Connectivity
  • International standard certification
  • Para – Medical Ambulance facilities (to and fro from Airport).

C. The Image of India needs to be enhanced (Standardization)
The only one quality that Indian health industry lacks in is Health standards and hygiene. Indian hospitals lack accreditation from the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organisations (JCAHO), suffer from a lack of standards in terms of quality and rates for healthcare procedures, have no gradation system and a far from perfect insurance sector. In addition, top Indian hospitals have high infection and mortality rates, and are unwilling to disclose data regarding these. Even if we were having the best of quality standards as has Indraprastha Apollo Hospital we will still be perceived as inferior in standards. This can be avoided by getting Quality standards .Apollo group of hospitals which has become the first hospital in India to get a JCI certification, the gold standard for US and European Hospitals. The same has to come to more hospitals of India.

D. Market accessibility
The next challenge for the Indian industry is to make the Indian market accessible by tourist travel agents and websites of Indian health tourism. The government can play a vital part as the same can bring in lots of foreign revenue.

The major ways of promoting our health tourism could be:
  • Tour operators and Travel agencies of India
  • Doctors of India visiting foreign countries- Pre/Post treatment.
  • International websites on Indian tourism with True Perceptions.
  • Globalisation of marketing activities by Indian Tour & Travel Agents
  • Tying up with foreign Travel Agents for promotion
  • Insurance companies abroad who target customers

E. Excess Glamourisation of Health Care
It has been seen that the doctors and key player hospitals in India emphasis more on glamorization of health care than its actual advantages or research uniqueness. We need to work more on our research in medical field to be competent enough to beat our international competitor. In other words SERVICES should be given more attention and importance than PACKAGING.

F. State Intervention
As this is a product which needs international tie-ups and international marketing, the state should help in the same. It should help the companies, hospitals and states in promoting health tourism abroad so that we can tap a wider range of customers.

G. Infrastructure
Indian hospitals must create exclusive infrastructure for corporate medical tourism
Chartered flight services, attractive tourism packages could be part of infrastructure
There's growing pressure on U.S. corporate to reduce expenditure on healthcare

H. Competition (Neighbouring countries)
Countries that actively promote medical tourism include Cuba, Costa Rica, Hungary, India, Israel, Jordan, Lithuania, Malaysia and Thailand. Belgium, Poland and Singapore are now entering the field. South Africa specializes in medical safaris-visit the country for a safari, with a stopover for plastic surgery, a nose job and a chance to see lions and elephants. Thus India has enough competition from the international market.This will be one of our major threats in bringing up and developing the health tourism industry.

I. Insurance Backup
One good way of tapping the foreign customers is tying up with Insurance companies abroad who could provide a genuine database of target customers. They can benefit from us by our services. Thus this would become a way of mutual marketing tacit cs between the Indian health tourism industry and the foreign Insurance agencies.

J. Local Demand vs. Global Demand
It can be seen in case of hospitals like Apollo and Escorts that the Local demand itself to be catered to is vast. We should remember that we should have the facilities enough to manage the foreign customers not neglecting the local markets. Thus it is a challenge for both the Alternate therapy industry and Corporate Health Care Service Providers to cater to this vast market efficiently without compromises in quality on either side.

Conclusion
Tamil Nadu has long been a centre of ancient healing traditions based on herbal medicine and holistic treatments that have evolved from folk knowledge as well as Asian well-being therapies such as Indian Ayurvedic and Allopathic practices. With the growing popularity of holistic healing techniques that restore balance and rejuvenate mind, body and spirit, in addition to conventional medical treatment, Tamil Nadu offers a one-stop shop that leaves you looking good and feeling great from hospital to hospitality.
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Last edited by TShyam; January 22nd, 2011 at 09:11 PM.
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Old January 22nd, 2011, 09:41 PM   #11
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MoU to promote diabetic wound care methods inked

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M.V. Hospital for Diabetes, Royapuram, on Saturday, signed a memorandum of understanding with Wound Healing Group, University of Southampton, UK, to promote diabetic wound care methods, research and training in India.

The agreement was signed by Vijay Viswanathan, managing director, M.V. Hospital for Diabetes and Prof. M. Viswanathan Diabetes Research Centre, and Raj Mani, faculty of medicine and health and life sciences, School of Medicine, University of Southampton, UK.

Mike Nithavrianakis, Deputy High Commissioner, British High Commission was present at the meeting.

Dr. Viswanathan spoke of the socio-economic impacts on wounds in diabetes patients.

There were 285 million people with diabetes in 2010, according to the Diabetes Atlas, 50.8 million of who were in India. The deaths due to diabetes in 2007 were about 3.7 million, he said.

Wound care is very expensive in India, and especially so with the diabetic population, Dr. Viswanathan said.

The challenge was not only to improve wound care and treatment facilities but also stress on prevention among the population and heath care practitioners.

Finn Gottrup, Professor of Surgery, Copenhagen Wound Healing Centre, stressed on the importance of wound care for senior citizens.

There are going to be more older people in the coming years, and if they have conditions such as diabetes, the chances of wounds are higher. The quality of life decreases and the costs are tremendous for patients and society, he added.

Some of the key aspects he stressed are optimal wound care, using standardised and evidence-based procedures, registering patient data, spreading awareness among patients and health care professionals.

Mr. Nithavrianakis said universities in the UK were keen to work with Indian institutions, on a partnership of equals. Saturday's MoU would bring together two equals and result in a win-win situation for them.

Prof. Mani spoke of the key strengths of the University of Southampton, and said the MoU would facilitate an exchange of scientific, academic and technical information between the two partners.

They would together identify opportunities for exchange, joint research and development, promote education and training in wound healing and improve skills of practitioners committed to it.
http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/...cle1116703.ece
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Old January 24th, 2011, 12:56 AM   #12
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70 lakh children to be covered in polio immunisation drive


Prevention: Chief Minister M. Karunanidhi administering polio drops to an infant in Chennai on Sunday. M.R.K. Panneerselvam, Health Minister and Chennai Mayor M. Subramanian are in the picture.

Quote:
CHENNAI: This year's Intensive Pulse Polio Immunisation programme began on Sunday with the Chief Minister, M. Karunanidhi, administering the first dose to a child at his residence in Gopalapuram.

The State Government proposes to administer the oral polio vaccine to 70 lakh children below the age of five in the State.

2 lakh volunteers

Around two lakh persons including those from government departments, Rotary clubs and non-governmental organisations, participated in the vaccination drive.

On Sunday, the vaccine was administered in 40,399 special camps at government hospitals, primary health centres, health sub-centres, noon meal centres, schools, bus stands, railway stations, places of worship and tourist spots.

Mobile camps were set up to administer the vaccine to children of migrants from North India and Sri Lankan refugees.

Marker

The right little finger of children who received the vaccine dose was marked with marker pens to help identify them.

Second round

In the second round, the pulse polio vaccines will be administered on February 27, an official press release said.
http://www.hindu.com/2011/01/24/stor...2453080900.htm
TN has the highest immunization coverage among all states in India.
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Old January 27th, 2011, 01:07 AM   #13
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Liver transplants at Stanley make the cut

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CHENNAI: The night before a transplant, theatre technician R Gowrishankar makes sure he's at the hospital doing all the groundwork right into the early hours. "I live in Red Hills and come to work by bus every day. On days when there is a transplant scheduled early in the morning, I come in the previous night to help set up the theatre," he says.

It is because of employees like Gowrishankar that Chennai-based Stanley Medical College and Hospital has achieved the distinction of being the only government hospital in the country to perform successful liver transplants -- it has already carried out 20 liver transplants over the past two years. The record is more noteworthy considering liver transplants are among the most expensive surgical procedures available and cost between Rs 30-35 lakh. Beneficiaries at Stanley have all been patients from the working class who would otherwise never have been able to afford the operation.

Celebrating the second anniversary of Stanley's first successful liver transplantation on Wednesday, director of the institute of surgical gastroenterology Dr R Surendran said it was the combined effort of technicians, doctors, nurses and other hospital staff that made the feat possible.

"The journey to this achievement has been a tough one with many difficulties in the way at every step. Two years back, I thought we would never do a liver transplant, but on January 27, 2009, we got the first liver and performed our first successful transplant. There has been no looking back ever since," he said.

Dr Surendran said that Deiva Sigamani, a sub inspector of police, was the first policeman in the country to get a liver transplant. "A liver transplant costs anywhere between Rs 30-35 lakhs. Most poor people cannot afford this," he said.

"I was a poor domestic worker and was suffering from chronic liver disease. I got a transplant two years back and I am perfectly fine now and able to cook and clean," said Sayed Ali Fathima, the first person to have undergone a liver transplant at the hospital who was also present at the event.

Speaking about the success of liver transplants, Dr Surendran said they had a 75% success rate with 15 out of the 20 patients alive and healthy now. The time taken to complete each surgery has also reduced from 18 hours in 2009 to just eight hours now.

"After having done 20 liver transplants, we are more proficient now and know exactly what to do. We would like to do more transplants but shortage of matching donor livers is a problem. We have 20 patients in every blood group waiting for a donor," he said. He however said there was an increasing awareness about transplants, with more people coming forward to donate the organs of their loved ones who had died.

The hospital has also brought down infection rates by 80% not only for liver transplants but also in other wards. "We make sure to disinfect the operation theatre and the wards and we hold a transplant meeting every morning at 10 to review various aspects like cleanliness," said Dr Rosie Vanilla, a microbiologist.

Deputy inspector general of police of Kancheepuram Ramachandran said it was a great feat for a government hospital to achieve. "I am also very happy because the last person who got a new liver was a policeman who had been suffering from chronic liver disease for an year. Thanks to Stanley hospital, he has got a new lease of life," he said.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/c...ow/7368433.cms
Please donate your body and that of your loved ones. Your grief in equal measure will translate in to joy of another family. Please educate others you know too about donating their body. There are lot of useful organs (heart, liver, kidney, eyes) which can be used for transplantation and save lives as well as improve their quality of life. You are not going to attain moksha being burnt in the pyre. But you might just do it by donating your body.

Body donation form - Tamilnadu government.
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Old January 27th, 2011, 01:19 AM   #14
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Chettinad Health City, Kelambakkam. Cross posting from Chennai Discussion.

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Originally Posted by Keeran View Post
Some photos taken in January 2010




















Courtesy: Keeran, SSC
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Old February 2nd, 2011, 12:19 AM   #15
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CHENNAI: In a 14-hour surgery, doctors in the city removed the small intestine of a 30-year-old patient, left it in a preservative for four hours and removed a large tumour from his abdomen before putting the bowel back in its place.

The patient name withheld who under went the auto-bowel transplant three months ago at the Global Hospitals in Chennai, is now back home in West Bengal. Doctors who operated on him said he is doing fine but will have to be monitored for a few more months.

"He came to hospital after being turned away by several hospitals," said liver transplant surgeon Dr Mohamed Rela. Reports showed that he had a large tumour in his pancreas, the organ that produces insulin. It was a slow growing lump called neuroendocrine tumour, which extended up to his stomach, crushing the vital artery that supplies blood to the bowels. If the tumour wasn't removed, the patient's bowels could have become dysfunctional, proving fatal.

"It was a complicated surgery. There was very little space to work on," recalled Dr Rela. The transplant team decided to go ahead with an auto-bowel transplant. They cut open the abdomen and removed the small intestine from the body and placed in a special preservation solution. Doctors then carefully removed the tumor, which looked bigger than a tennis ball. They then put the small intestine back into the abdomen.

During the post surgical period, doctors ensured that the patient developed no complications. A few weeks later, the patient was discharged from the hospital.

Transplant surgeons in the city said the surgery was rare and required skill. "In such surgeries, it extremely important to do anything to save the patient," said senior surgical gasteroenterologist Dr J S Rajkumar, who heads Lifeline Hospitals.

So how far are doctors from doing a bowel transplant? Can transplant surgeons now successfully replace ailing bowels with the ones that are donated by relatives of brain dead patients? "Not yet," said Dr Rela, who has done bowel transplants in the UK. "A bowel transplant is more challenging than the surgery we did. Here the bowel is patient's own and chances of rejection is very low. But for a bowel transplant, we need a bigger team of experts and a better environment."

End-stage bowel disease patients are extremely weak and malnourished; the chances of rejection are extremely high and patients are put on immune-suppressing medications to prevent this. The post surgical ward has to be sterile enough to prevent infection and death. "We are not there yet to see success," Dr Rela said.

But Dr Anil Dhawan of King's College Hospital, London, who was in the city to address a scientific session on liver diseases, said it would not take too long. Ten years ago, India did not see big success in liver transplant when countries like UK were doing it efficiently. At that time, doctors in the UK failed in bowel transplants. Now, we see a fair amount of success. Surgeons here will find a way to do it," he said.
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/c...ow/7399894.cms
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Old February 2nd, 2011, 12:33 PM   #16
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Nice thread..

VELAMMAL to set-up a Rs.300 Crore Medical College and Hospital in Ring road,Madurai..

MMHRC-Meenakshi mission is setting up another 300-bedded start of art Hospital near Melur, along with Paramedical Institutions.
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Judgement delayed is judgement denied !
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Old February 7th, 2011, 07:10 AM   #17
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Cancer Survivor's day celebrated

Cancer can be cured if detected in early stage.



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Old February 22nd, 2011, 09:53 AM   #18
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Indigenous critical care ventilators rolled out

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Now Indian hospitals need no longer depend on imported ventilators for critical care of its patients. ‘Inventa', India's first indigenous critical care ventilator, has started rolling out of Coimbatore.

A joint project of the Society for Bio-Medical Technology (SBMT), a division of the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), National Institute for Mental Health and Neuro Sciences (NIMHANS), Bangalore, and the PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore, ‘Inventa' is gaining entry into Indian hospitals, albeit slowly.

The ventilator, manufactured by a Coimbatore-based firm, can be used by patients admitted to Intensive Care Units and all those who require assisted breathing.

“The work, which began in 2003, has borne fruit and commercial production has begun. The first lot of 100 units has been sold out. It is a fully indigenous product that is sleek, portable and cost-effective,” W. Selvamurthy, Distinguished Scientist and Chief Controller of Research and Development, DRDO, said here on Monday.

As against the imported ventilators, which cost approximately Rs.13 lakh, the indigenous version costs Rs.4.5 lakh. With the country's annual requirement being 2,000 units, it is expected that mass production of ‘Inventa' will address this need in the most cost-effective manner.

Speaking to The Hindu, P. V. Mohan Ram, Principal Investigator, ‘Design and Development of Indigenous Critical Care Medical Ventilator', PSG College of Technology, said the SBMT approached the college to submit a proposal for a ventilator that was initially proposed for use by soldiers working at high-altitudes.

“In 2003, we came out with a bench model. The SBMT suggested changes and based on these a prototype of a ventilator was designed with the help of medical advice from NIMHANS. The final prototype and its operation were shown to SBMT in 2007. It was approved and accordingly the technology transfer was made to Pricol Medical Systems Limited here,” Mr. Mohan Ram said.

When the DRDO found the final prototype suitable for medical use, ethical clearance was obtained from Drug Controller General of India before handing it over for commercialisation.

The first 100 units have been procured by government hospitals and medical colleges. Since it is a viable product, the DRDO is seeking patronage of Central and State governments for promoting its use.

“We are approaching the Director-General Armed Forces Medical Services for using the ventilator in military hospitals and government officials for installing them in Government hospitals,” Mr. Selvamurthy said.

Since the design of ‘Inventa' has been a success, the PSG College of Technology has been entrusted with the project of developing paediatric ventilators too. These are for critical care of premature babies and children.

According to Mr. Selvamurthy, the first prototype will be ready for demonstration in June 2011.
http://www.thehindu.com/news/states/...cle1478371.ece
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Old February 26th, 2011, 11:40 AM   #19
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Organ donation loses to minutiae of law

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CHENNAI: The two-and-half-year-old state cadaver registry saw one of its most legally intriguing cases on Thursday.

The family of a 36-year-old brain dead patient, Radhakrishnan, who works in a lathe, was keen on donating his organs. The hospital where he was admitted sent the request to the state cadaver organ registry. But since he sustained head injuries during a tussle with his friend, the registry insisted on a no-objection letter from the police. The Triplicane police, which is probing the case, turned down the request.

The question they posed was: "Is a patient who is clinically dead really dead?" If the organs are retrieved before he is dead, should the case be one of murder or of attempt to murder? Also, should the person responsible for the victim's injury be charged with murder because the victim is brain-dead or attempt to murder because brain-death has not been overtly covered by Section 302 of the IPC.

"We will not be able to allow doctors to harvest the organs until we have all the papers," said Dr J Amalorpavanathan, convenor, state organ transplant registry.

According to the police, Radhakrishnan sustained head injuries after one of his friends pushed him down after a fight on Tuesday. He was taken to the Government General Hospital the same day, but was moved to a private hospital on Wednesday. On Thursday, doctors attending to him declared him brain-dead.

The patient's wife told the doctors that the family was keen on organ donation. Not aware of the legal recourse available to them, a relative of the family even landed in the Madras high court to meet the Chief Justice and place a special request before him. But he could not meet Chief Justice M Yusuf Eqbal, who had left his office by then.

When the patient's brain loses functional ability, doctors declare brain death. The organs, however, are kept functional with life-support systems. The patient, according to the Transplant of Human Organs Act, is eligible to donate vital organs if his family agrees. The Tamil Nadu government in its order also said that if the investigating officer agrees and if the forensic experts record the post-mortem, the organ donation can be carried out.

"We have sustained the functioning of the organs with ventilator. But we are losing time," said a senior doctor at Global Hospital.

Most doctors working for promoting cadaver organ donation said that the state needs to create more awareness. "Police should be convinced that donation will not come in the way of investigation. They will be able to conclude this only if they consult with forensic experts," said Dr Sunil Shroff, who runs MOHAN foundation.
He also pointed out that in the US, definition of death comes under the Uniform Determination of Death Act (UDDA). This includes both natural and brain death; hence switching off the ventilator does not become an issue. "In India too, we should pitch for this," he said.

The Uniform Determination of Death Act (UDDA) in the US says: An individual who has sustained either 1) irreversible cessation of circulatory and respiratory functions, or 2) irreversible cessation of all functions of the entire brain, including the brain stem, is dead.

A determination of death must be made with accepted medical standards. Most US states have adopted the UDDA. Several states have added amendments regarding physician qualifications, confirmation by a second physician, or religious exemption.
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/c...ow/7567183.cms
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Old March 5th, 2011, 11:40 AM   #20
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Chennai Doctors Conduct Rare Robotic Surgery

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s per latest reports, a rare heart surgical operation utilizing a robot was recently carried out at the Chettinad Health City, Chennai.

The operation was conducted on 23-year-old D Vijayakanth, a resident of Vellore, on February 21 by a group of expert physicians headed by Dr. R Ravi Kumar, Director, Institute of Cardio Vascular Disease.

Vijayakanth had rheumatic valvular illness, owing to which he complained of shortness of breath and could not walk properly.

Dr. R Ravi Kumar stated that the robotically-assisted surgery entails the replacement of both the mitral as well as the aortal valve concurrently.

The surgical procedure, which cost Rs 2.25 lakh, was performed by a three armed robot.

"The best part about using a robot in cardiac surgery is that the patient's heart need not be opened and the surgery can be done using a small 4cm incision. This is not possible with normal surgeries without a robot," Dr. Ravi added.

Whilst the single valve surgical procedure was conducted in 2000, the double valve procedure happened after 11 years, Dr. Ravi also said.

He added that robotic surgical operation, which is quite new in India, can be utilized for a range of medical procedures.

The major benefit in this arena, said Dr. Ravi Kumar, was the recovery time. He forecasted that by the next 10 years about 80% of the surgical procedures in India would be done using robots.
http://www.topnews.in/chennai-doctor...urgery-2316804
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