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Old September 15th, 2006, 03:09 AM   #661
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Retail info:

Aqua:

The building also will include more than 36,000 square feet of first and second floor retail that will connect to the underground pedway system.

MAGELLAN DEVELOPMENT ANNOUNCES 3 RETAIL LEASES FOR THE SHOREHAM AT LAKESHORE EAST

A trio of leases for a bank, an Italian-style coffee bar and the design center for Lakeshore East has been completed for the lobby level of The Shoreham, the 48-story luxury apartment tower in the mixed-use neighborhood under development on the Near East Side.

Fifth Third Bank has leased 4,918 square feet at the west end
of the building’s lobby level retail space that will provide standard Fifth Third Bank retail banking services as well as an internal ATM machine and a drive-through lane and window. The facility is expected to be open for business in October.

Fifth Third Bank was represented by Dan Tausk of MidAmerica Real Estate Group. Rob Rowe of Sierra Realty Advisors represented ownership.

A Caffé RoM (pronounced Rome) coffee shop will occupy approximately 1,700 square feet and provide a variety of coffees and pastries and lunches that include freshly made salads, gourmet sandwiches and Italian-style Panini. Mid-afternoon choices include specialty coffee drinks, imported Gelato and fine chocolates. Proprietor Joe DiCarlo, who also owns and operates five popular Caffé Baci restaurants downtown and another Caffé RoM in the Prudential Building, says it “will have the authentic atmosphere of an Italian coffee house.” He aims to open by November or December.

Lakeshore East developer Magellan Development Group has leased an additional 1,700 square feet at The Shoreham to relocate its comprehensive design center and Magellan Realty operation from 710 N. State Street.

Magellan Design Coordinator Lee Okamoto noted that “our current and future buyers will find this on-site location far more convenient for the selection of design finishes and upgrades.”

The trio of retail leases come on the heels of an earlier announcement that Treasure Island will anchor the community’s future 90,000-square-foot Village Market Center with a 28,000-square-foot full service grocery store. Brian Gordon, Magellan vice president of development, reports that additional leases for the Village Market Center are currently under discussion.

“We’re very pleased to be moving forward with our planned variety of shops and services for the convenience of Lakeshore East residents and our neighbors as well,” said Magellan President David Carlins.
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Old September 15th, 2006, 04:08 AM   #662
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^This is probably better suited to the separate Aqua thread.
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Old September 15th, 2006, 05:42 AM   #663
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September 14, 2006

The Chandler


The Tides


Lakeshore East Development
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Old September 22nd, 2006, 07:19 AM   #664
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September 19, 2006

The Tides




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Old September 28th, 2006, 05:48 AM   #665
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Lakeshore East has completely revamped its website, if anyone hasn't noticed. It looks nice.

I was hoping to get more pics of developments, but there's nothing new. You get a better look at the design of the parkhomes, though. They've been "coming soon" for 2 years now
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Old October 1st, 2006, 07:14 PM   #666
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http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...l=chi-news-hed

Urban center attracts high-income couples

By Noreen S. Ahmed-Ullah

Tribune staff reporter
Published October 1, 2006

Evening had come to an oddly pastoral little piece of Chicago's downtown. Kids ran through sprinklers, dogs bounded around a dog park and office workers strolled home.

Around them loomed condo towers, partially built high-rises and bright yellow construction cranes. Beyond that, largely unseen and seemingly unrelated, was the crush of Loop traffic, the horns, buses and crowded sidewalks.

Just a few years earlier, none of it was there.

With little fanfare, one of the largest downtown residential developments in the nation has begun to rise between the Loop and the lake--a new Chicago neighborhood created from what was essentially a blank slate, a pitch-and-putt golf course and old railyards. Officials estimate that by the time the complex is completed, 15,000 people will ultimately move into the 28-acre parcel known as Lakeshore East.

Bounded by the Chicago River on the north, Lake Shore Drive on the east, and a network of elevated streets to the west and south, Lakeshore East is near the heart of the city. Yet both by geography and by choice, the development is isolated.

And with a total of 16 high-rises and 90 townhouses scheduled for completion over the next nine years, the one-of-a-kind project is raising questions about how the central city is being remade and who will live there.

Urban planners find parts of Lakeshore East they admire, but some believe the city could have done a better job including mixed-income housing and adding more commercial space.

"It's a lost opportunity," said Brent Ryan, assistant professor of urban planning at the University of Illinois at Chicago. "It just goes to show that there's still a lot to learn about creating new neighborhoods that have the diversity of older neighborhoods.

"You go there and feel it's oddly quiet and sterile," Ryan said. "And it's not only because it's not done. It doesn't have the actual vibrancy you'd find in a real urban neighborhood. It's like a suburban community, where you feel safe because you're with people like you."

Peter Skosey, vice president of external relations at the non-profit Metropolitan Planning Council, disagreed. Unlike in suburbs, the buildings at Lakeshore East will look different from one another and will be appropriate to a city, he said.

In addition, he said, it's difficult to have affordable housing on prime downtown property fronting the lake.

Some residents living just to the south, in high-rises lining Randolph Street, were apprehensive about the extreme makeover taking place in their back yard. But over time they have grown to like parts of the complex, such as the six-acre park at its center.

For others, the development seemed inevitable.

"We'd go to meetings and people would complain, and we'd think What did you expect? It's a big chunk of land on the lakefront, in downtown," said Walt Garrett, who has lived with his wife in the area for 14 years. "We knew it would happen. We're just happy with the way it's turned out."

About 10,000 people live in an area bounded by Michigan Avenue, the lake, Grant Park and the Chicago River, according to the New East Side Association of Residents.

Two years ago, one condo building opened in the Lakeshore East development. An apartment building was completed last year. And a 325-unit condominium building was completed in August.

Residents of the development say they feel like a new breed of urban pioneers, navigating their way through triple-deck streets and pedways. They scout for places to shop for groceries and visit neighboring Streeterville's trendy restaurants and bars.

They have also tried to establish a sense of community in their fledgling new neighborhood, throwing a Cinco de Mayo party, a Cultural Expo, bringing in officials from major cultural institutions, and having summer-long yoga in the park.

Construction is under way or soon to begin on new buildings, including the 80-story Aqua, considered the architectural gem of the development, with undulating balconies that mimic rippling waves. Three other buildings will soon be ready for occupants.

Plans are also under way for grocery and hardware stores, shops, restaurants and a bank.

"Granted, we're the pioneers, but we'll have shopping soon," said Lexis Livengood, whose enthusiasm for the development has led her to buy a second condo in a building under construction.

In June, Mayor Richard Daley included money for an elementary school for the development as part of his $1 billion new schools plan, hoping to attract more families with children.

The development follows other large-scale downtown build-outs such as Dearborn Park and the Central Station development in the South Loop.

Those, too, were built on abandoned railroad yards and reflect a phenomenon going on across the country--the return of the middle and upper middle class to central city neighborhoods. As the movement has progressed, so has the density of developments to accommodate the market, Ryan said.

While Lakeshore East is not the largest residential development downtown in terms of the area it covers, it has the most units. In all, 4,950 units, 1,500 hotel rooms and some office space are proposed.

The parcel was not always slated for condos. At one point, it was meant to be an office complex, part of the Illinois Center development. But with the recession of the 1980s, the land sat vacant, then was converted into a golf course and finally sold to the current developers.

With the residential market booming, Magellan Development Group decided to build condos. The developer decided not to extend the current street level east toward the lake. Instead, the firm chose the lowest level as its ground, creating a sunken space, hidden from most of downtown.

A park was proposed for the center of the development to tie together the buildings--designed by five architects--and create a neighborhood.

The park was built first so residents wouldn't feel they were in a construction zone, said Joel Carlins, co-chairman of Magellan. It not only has playground flooring made from recycled plastics, but also offers free wireless Internet connections. The complex caters to a high-end clientele, with prices averaging $675,000 and up. Town houses and penthouses in the Aqua are inching closer to $2.5 million.

Joe Aceto, 53, and his wife, Beatrice, 41, moved here seven months ago from northwest suburban Bartlett.

At night, he sits on his balcony and listens to the water dancing in the fountain below. It is quiet, tranquil.

"I've lived in small towns in Wisconsin," Aceto said. "I thought I'd feel trapped in a high-rise, that it would be noisy in the city."

Instead, he found the suburbs tucked away in downtown Chicago.

Right now, dozens of children from the area are bused to Ogden School on the Near North Side.

Other children attend private schools in nearby neighborhoods. The proposed school, possibly a charter school, will offer classes from kindergarten to 8th grade. It is scheduled to open in two years.

As the development progresses, traffic will also become an issue. Already, it led many residents earlier this year to oppose the Chicago Children's Museum's efforts to move to the north end of Grant Park, off Randolph Street.

Ald. Burton Natarus (42nd) wants to remove the auto pound from the lowest level of Wacker Drive, which opens onto the development, and add a ramp to the middle level, thus providing easy access to Lake Shore Drive.

For now, many residents like the Acetos have learned to give up their cars and walk everywhere. They walk to work in the Loop, to nearby grocery stores, to shopping on Michigan Avenue.

Aceto learned another lesson in urban pioneering as well--living with less space.

"I learned I really didn't need as much space as I thought I did," he said.
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Old October 14th, 2006, 09:40 AM   #667
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October 13, 2006

The Tides
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Old October 21st, 2006, 06:18 AM   #668
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October 17, 2006

The Chandler
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Old October 22nd, 2006, 07:24 PM   #669
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Woohoo!!! Another forgettable tower begins to receive it's forgettable facade in LSE! Party the **** on.
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Old October 22nd, 2006, 08:11 PM   #670
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^ Dude, not everything can be an architectural showcase to the world. Great skylines always have tons of "filler" buildings, as I like to call them
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Old October 23rd, 2006, 03:40 AM   #671
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geoff_diamond View Post
Woohoo!!! Another forgettable tower begins to receive it's forgettable facade in LSE! Party the **** on.
Historically great residential architecture has served great private wealth, while architecturally significant residential towers are quite pricey, The asking price at both the Trump's Tower and 400 North are record breaking. Great public buildings whose architecture often represent a kind of public majesty are handsomely funded by taxpayers. LakeshoreEast is a residential development of more modest ambition yet embracing some considerable non-building amenities, such as their fine, public park with free wi-fi access. It's probably reasonable to assume that when the development is completed, many other delightful features in and around its towers and town homes will be in place making for a homey, communal feeling. If memory serves, this project was conceived before Millenium Park, and so the location had its risk as well.
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Old October 23rd, 2006, 04:17 AM   #672
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I don't need the lesson on quality or filler; I already understand it and have voiced my acceptance of filler towers on many other threads in this forum. There was just nothing else to say about the Chandler - and... for the record - good architecture DOESN'T have to cost a lot of money (see Contemporaine).
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Old October 23rd, 2006, 07:23 AM   #673
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Well hopefully those rumored 70-80+ story buildings will cover up all the crap that's been polluting LSE lately. The only reason I get upset with Chandler and Regatta is because they face the river.
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Old October 23rd, 2006, 06:14 PM   #674
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Same reason they get me mad. At least the shoreham and tides should be covered up from the river view. Those two have no reason to be in this city at all.
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Old October 24th, 2006, 12:58 AM   #675
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geoff_diamond View Post
I don't need the lesson on quality or filler; I already understand it and have voiced my acceptance of filler towers on many other threads in this forum. There was just nothing else to say about the Chandler - and... for the record - good architecture DOESN'T have to cost a lot of money (see Contemporaine).
Points all well taken. Clearly good architecture doesn't have to cost much, the trick seems to be in getting the good artist and the right patron together.
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Old October 24th, 2006, 01:41 AM   #676
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Yeah, but the rest of the architecture on the Main Branch isn't perfect either (or the South Branch for that matter). Buildings like Unitrin, the Westin, the Hyatt-Regency and the apartments that surround it are pretty bad by current standards of architecture (speaking as an observer, of course, not an architect).

I won't comment on IBM, Equitable, and Illinois Center since I happen to like pure Miesian International style, whereas some do not.

The fact is, filler buildings are a fact of life in a city, even in the most beautiful street (or river) scape. I'm just glad that there's enough variation between LSE's river-facing buildings to avoid monotony.
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Old November 7th, 2006, 11:33 PM   #677
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..

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Old November 29th, 2006, 09:04 AM   #678
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Regatta Updates!

Construction workers hard at work!



The finishers, laborers, and iron workers resting before the concrete starts




The finished 13th floor deck.


Column and beam puddling with high strength concrete with the crane. They placed with the pump and the crane at the same time.


Thanks for the shot guys!
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Old December 11th, 2006, 06:29 AM   #679
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From today. Go Chandler Go. You ugly son of a bitch.

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Old December 11th, 2006, 06:41 AM   #680
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^Seeing photos like that makes me wonder how awesome Regatta and Chandler would've looked like had they not cheapend out. Hopefully some new talls will obscure most of the garbage that has polluted LSE.
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