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Old April 4th, 2011, 08:24 PM   #61
TShyam
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Thank you Mehulkamder. Looking forward to your continued contribution.

C-I-S and C-I-G-S also comes under thin film right? Where do you see the efficiency plateauing up? 30%? 40%? 50%?

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It has not been easy though we have been talking to some software technology park promoters in Chennai and Bangalore with no success to show. You might think that companies would want to be able to use airconditioning for 300 days in a year without paying for it, but businesses have different ideas sometimes.
Yeah I understand. Companies can be brutally adventurous or unreasonably conservative. I think it is more to do with the classical thinking of "oh! solar panels? It has significant upfront costs - not suitable for now!!" People tend to dismiss it without even looking deeper into it. I am sure if you demonstrate your proof of concept in one building, then that will be the foot in the door. Others will queue up if they come to know of the advantages.
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Old April 8th, 2011, 08:59 PM   #62
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Powergear in JV with Spanish wind tower firm / SRI CITY news

http://www.business-standard.com/ind...-firm-/431562/

To set up facility near Chennai in partnership with Gestamp Wind Steel.

Powergear Ltd, a Bangalore-based electrical equipment manufacturer for energy sector, has entered into a joint venture with Spanish wind power firm Gestamp Wind Steel to manufacture wind towers near Chennai with an initial investment of Rs 150 crore.

The JV company would set up a 20-acre greenfield manufacturing facility at Sricity, a planned integrated business city 60 km away from Chennai.

The company expects to start commercial production by the last quarter of the current fiscal year. The 60:40 JV firm, Gestamp Powergear Windsteel Ltd, in which Gestamp holds a majority stake, is targeting around 400 towers in three years to clock in sales of around Rs 500 crore in first three years of operation.

“The plant will be fully operational by three years and we are expecting a sales of Rs 150 crore revenue in the first year of operation,” said X Durairaj, chairman, Powergear Ltd.

He said that the JV would manufacture 130 towers in the first year of operation, expand it to 250-260 towers in the second year and to around 350 to 400 towers by the third year.

Gestamp Wind Steel would provide technology apart from investment, while Powergear would put in its manufacturing capabilities to the operations of the JV, he added. It would supply towers of 1.6 MW, 2.5 MW and 3MW for its customers.

Javier Ignacio Imaz Rubalcaba, CEO, Gestamp Wind Steel, said the company was convinced about the market potential for wind energy in India and had been looking for right partner to start joint operations.

The annual wind power market in India is around 2200 MW at present, and is expected to grow to 5000 MW per annum by 2015, according to World Institute of Sustainable Energy. The cumulative installed capacity in the country is currently at 13 Giga Watts and is expected to reach 64 GW by 2020, according to reports.

Powergear Ltd is involved in the design, fabrication, and installation of electrical equipments catering to international and domestic customers. It has exports to over 21 countries including USA, Japan, Spain, Argentina, Mexico, Saudi Arabia, Abudabi, Oman, Malaysia, Italy, China and Sri Lanka.

Gestamp Wind Steel is a part of Gestamp Corporation, which is focused on steel, automotive components and renewable energy industries. Its wholly owned subsidiary, Gestamp Automotive India and solar business firm Gestamp Solar, are executing various projects in India at present.
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Old April 9th, 2011, 07:34 AM   #63
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Not related to Chennai

http://www.engadget.com/2011/03/31/v...wind-turbine/#

Building and putting any sort of offshore wind turbine into place is a fairly impressive bit of engineering, but Denmark's Vestas is truly going the extra mile with its new V164-7.0 MW turbine. Not only does it promise to provide seven megawatts of power but, as you can see above, each of the blades is longer than nine double-decker buses, which gives the turbine itself a larger total diameter than the London Eye. Of course, the company also hopes that there will eventually be not just a few of these, but massive farms of the turbines at sea (the North Sea, specifically), although that won't exactly happen overnight -- Vestas only expects to have the first prototypes ready by the end of 2012, with full production expected to begin in the first quarter of 2015. Head on past the break for a video -- don't worry, nothing like this happens.

VESTAS HAS IT'S R & D CENTERS IN CHENNAI TOO - THEYARE EXPANDING.
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Old April 17th, 2011, 10:20 AM   #64
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New development - not related to Chennai.

http://news.radio-electronics.co/mar...ed-by-siemens/

CHENNAI: The energy infrastructure developing firm, Siemens has unveiled its new India-specific wind turbine 'SWT-2.3-113 (Direct Drive)' for the customers working in wind-based power generation sector of the country.

This new efficient and innovative wind turbine has been introduced by Siemens during the recently organised Wind Power India International Conference and Exhibition 2011 in the city of Chennai. Based on the direct drive technology of the company, this new wind turbine has been also provided with a large rotor, quantum blade and a net converter, to generate power even in the low and moderate wind areas of the country.

Siemens has developed and introduced this new wind turbine in order to enhance its presence in the wind based power generation market of India. The company is also planning to set up a new manufacturing unit in Vadodara city in the state of Gujarat. Siemens would likely to start the commercial production at this proposed factory by the year 2013.
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Old April 20th, 2011, 08:03 PM   #65
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An overview of operations of Gamesa

http://www.dealcurry.com/20110420-IF...d-Turbines.htm

IFC Provides $16 Mn Loan To Gamesa Wind Turbines

IFC has provided $16 Mn (Euro 11 Mn) loan to Gamesa Wind Turbines Pvt Ltd, to help build a wind-turbine assembly facility.

IFC's loan will support Gamesa's plans to scale up its assembly capacity in India over the next two years.

Gamesa Wind Turbine is a subsidiary of Spain-based Gamesa Tecnologica S.A. It designs, manufactures, and installs wind turbines, as well as manages operation and maintenance services. It also develops, constructs, and sells wind farms.

Gamesa launched its operations in India in 2010 by setting up a factory to manufacture turbine in Red Hills near Chennai.

It will manufacture 850 KW wind turbine suited for Indian conditions. The company plans to set up a 85 MW wind farm near Coimbatore.

So far, the company had set up two wind farms in Theni (85 MW) and Coimbatore (50 MW) in Tamil Nadu. The total investments in these two centres were about Rs.500 Cr.

Parent firm, Gamesa has 21,000 MW installed in 30 countries with production facilities in China, India, Europe, and US. It has a workforce of over 7,000 employees.

Denmark's NEF-MICON and Germany's Enercon GmBH are some of foreign wind turbine manufacturing companies having presence in India.

While Suzlon Energy, Shriram EPC Ltd and Elecon Engineering Company Ltd are some of the Indian firms engaged in manufacturing wind turbines.

General Atlantic Partners is also planning to invest Rs.150 Cr ($35 Mn) in Chennai-based ReGen Powertech Pvt Ltd, a wind turbine company for minority stake.

Recently, IFC planned to invest $15 Mn in Hyderabad-based Vivimed Labs Ltd, a manufacturer and exporter of specialty chemicals (for personal care and industrial segments) and pharmaceutical products, to support its expansion project.

According to the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE), currently, the share of renewable based capacity is 10.9% (excluding large hydro) of the total installed capacity of 170 GW in the country, up from 2% at the start of the 10th Plan Period (2002-2007). This includes 13,065.78 MW of wind, 2,939 MW of small hydro power, 1,562 MW of (bagasse based) cogeneration, 997 MW of biomass, 73.46 MW of 'waste to power' and 17.80 MW of solar PV for grid connected renewables at the end of 2010.
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Old April 27th, 2011, 04:11 AM   #66
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Converteam's converters manufacturing facility in Chennai to open in Q2 2011

http://machinist.in/index.php?option...=3266&Itemid=2

Power conversion specialist - Converteam's converters manufacturing facility in Chennai is slated to open in the second quarter of this year. It will cater to the needs of the growing renewable energy market in India, both wind and solar.

"The opening of our converters manufacturing facility in Chennai will be a key driver for Converteam to serve the local wind and solar customers. This plant will complement our presence in India where we already have more than 500 engineers supporting Indian and global businesses," said Peter Oram, Business Director at Converteam.

The company has secured a contract from RK Wind to supply 230 full power wind turbine converters. The converters will be built and supplied from Converteam’s new manufacturing facility in Chennai. Converteam's Kidsgrove factory in the UK will supply the core technology components and power modules, in addition to the initial few converters.

"The Indian wind market is growing very fast, and is progressively moving to larger variable speed turbines where Converteam can really make the difference," said Peter Oram.

"We chose Converteam not only for their experience and proven technology in wind converters but also because of their ability to streamline our supply chain through local manufacturing and services," said Rajkumar Yadav, Chairman & Managing Director of RK Wind, part of the RS India Group. The Converters supplied by Converteam over a period of more than two years will be installed at RK Wind’s windfarms in Thirunelveli (Tamil Nadu) and Karad (Maharashtra).

Converteam has two main entities in India: Converteam India near Delhi and Converteam EDC near Chennai. The Engineering Development Centre (EDC) was created at the beginning of 2005 to provide global technical support to Converteam units located at Europe and North America, in automation, power systems, software, drafting and other support services. An International Purchasing Office (IPO) was opened in Chennai to take advantage of Leading Competitive Countries markets for the sourcing of strategic commodities.

In December 2010, Converteam was awarded a €6 million contract for major elements of electrical equipment and control systems for two geotechnical vessels under construction in India. The first vessel is due for delivery by Q2 2012 and the second vessel in Q4 2012. The award comes from Indian shipyard Tebma which is constructing the vessels on behalf of Fugro NV, the Netherlands.

The two 82.9m vessels will be constructed at Tebma's Malpe yard in south west India and will feature Converteam's diesel electric propulsion system together with their C-Series of control systems including a dual redundant dynamic position control system and a sophisticated vessel control and automation system.

In November 2010, Danieli & C SpA awarded Converteam a contract, worth in excess of €20m, for major electrical engineering products and services for a new steel plate mill in India..

The new Rourkela plate rolling facility, for Steel Authority of India (SAIL), situated in the state of Orissa in North East India, will have an initial yearly production capacity of 0.92 million tonnes of steel plate with a provision for future expansion to 1.674 million tonnes. The new Rourkela plant is expected to be fully operational in a little under three years.

Converteam India supports the engineering and commercial operations from its bases in Chennai, Mumbai, Delhi and Kolkata. The projects will also draw on Converteam’s resources in UK to deliver the engineering and manufacturing effort.

For fiscal year 2010, Converteam recorded an 85% growth in orders from its units in China, India and Brazil, capturing the accelerated expansion of these emerging economies.

In March 2011, Converteam has signed an agreement with GE pursuant to which the financial Converteam shareholders commit to sell their shares to GE. Converteam will remain an autonomous profit center and will be the center of excellence for Power Conversion within GE Energy.
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Old April 28th, 2011, 12:26 PM   #67
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India’s Rusting Wind Farms Help Gamesa, Vestas Expand Foothold


Cattle graze near a windmill in Kammalapatti, India. Europe's wind-turbine makers are stepping up sales in India's clean-energy rust belt, anticipating a boom in one of the bigger "repowering" plays that Gamesa says may be worth £2.3 billion in sales. Photographer: Adeel Halim/Bloomberg

Four new windmills made by Gamesa Corp. Tecnologica SA whirl beside a banana grove in India’s southern village of Kammalapatti, driven by a breeze that’s too soft to spin a group of older turbines standing idle nearby.

The Spanish manufacturer replaced 10 older machines for the wind farm’s owner, gaining a toehold in a nation with about 4,600 wind turbines more than a decade old, many of them rusty or too small for today’s power market, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance analyst Shantanu Jaiswal in New Delhi.

Europe’s wind-turbine makers are stepping up sales in India’s clean-energy rust belt, anticipating a boom in one of the bigger “repowering” plays that Gamesa says may be worth £2.3 billion in sales. The challenge is in taking work from Suzlon Energy Ltd. (SUEL), the dominant local supplier, and in getting funds in a market still depressed by the financial crisis.

“Many good-quality wind sites are currently populated with relatively old and inefficient turbines,” said Amit Kansal, vice president of sales for the Indian unit of Denmark’s Vestas Wind Systems A/S, the world’s largest wind-turbine maker. “The opportunity for repowering is obvious.”

The 4,600 turbines have a capacity of 1.3 gigawatts, or about 9 percent of the installed base in India, which rocketed to become the fifth-biggest wind market by offering tax credits to operators regardless of productivity, Jaiswal said.

India’s Lure

“Some of them didn´t use turbines of the best quality,” Jaiswal said. India also has the smallest average turbine size of the world’s top 10 markets, according to Kenersys GmbH, a German manufacturer.

Gamesa’s estimate of a 168 billion-rupee (£2.3 billion) sales potential assumes 3,000 megawatts of installed capacity in need of replacement.

All three turbine makers have lost money for shareholders over the last 12 months and are looking for new markets. Suzlon has dropped about 21 percent in the period, Gamesa has lost 28 percent, and Vestas is down 47 percent.

India isn’t alone in wooing companies to refurbish wind power plants. In the U.S., about 1,500 megawatts of windmills were installed in the 1980s and may need to be replaced with new, higher-output ones, said Liz Salerno, director of industry analysis at the American Wind Energy Association. About 85 percent of wind turbines were installed in the last five years, and most should produce power for another 20, she said.

NextEra Energy Inc. (NEE), the largest U.S. wind producer, plans to replace about 5 percent of its oldest turbines in the next four years, Chief Executive Lew Hay said in January. In Denmark, where Vestas is based, most turbines are 10 to 15 years old, said Anders Hasselager, a Danish Energy Agency policy adviser.

Cheaper Than New

In India, repowering a site costs 20 percent less than setting up a new project and avoids the difficulties of obtaining new land permits, said J. Balakrishnan, a Gamesa sales manager working on a repowering project there.

The smaller turbines installed in India are less efficient, require higher wind speeds and generate less power than newer models. The Indian government also is prodding the industry toward modernization.

Many existing wind farms in India were built to take advantage of a tax break that allowed companies to write off expenses of installing turbines more quickly than elsewhere. The measure encouraged companies to erect turbines but not to maintain them or see that they produced power, according to Renewable Energy Minister Farooq Abdullah.

“The time has come for India to think of repowering,” Abdullah told a conference in February, where he complained about the number of facilities with broken blades and rusting equipment.

Tax Credits

He wants the finance ministry to scrap the tax credit next year and replace it with an alternative subsidy that rewards projects for the amount of clean energy they generate. The so- called generation-based incentive pays wind farms 500 rupees (£6.65) a megawatt-hour of electricity they feed to the grid.

Still, many operators won’t want to junk equipment that has more than half its useful life left.

Gamesa, which completed India’s first repowering project last month, thinks installations in Spain and other European countries can be revamped too, Chief Executive Officer Jorge Calvet said in an interview last month in Mumbai.

Kenersys, the German manufacturer, and Orient Green Power Ltd., an Indian developer of renewable-energy projects, say they’re looking for ways to tap into the budding repowering market.

The Gamesa project at Kammalapatti in Tamil Nadu state is owned by a unit of Lakshmi Machine Works Ltd. (LMW), a Coimbatore- based maker of textile machinery.

Bigger and Better

The newer machines -- with hub heights and rotor diameters more than double that of the older ones -- are better able to harvest energy from the wind. Controls inside their towers measure the wind speed, air pressure and tilt the fiberglass blades to best catch the breezes.

The new machines may double the farm’s electricity output by the end of the monsoon season in October, helping the project pay off in five years, Gamesa estimates.

Older machines can use more power than they produce during low-wind seasons. Owners turn them off, sometimes for up to half the year, said N. Sudhakar, site manager for Lakshmi Machine’s unit Super Sales India Ltd. (SSAI) Once a windmill stops, it needs power from the grid to start turning again.

“It doesn’t make sense to use them,” Sudhakar said. “They don’t produce enough power.”

Maintenance Costs

Other benefits include lower maintenance costs and easier access to replacement, the Global Wind Energy Council said. Lakshmi Machine Works’ dismantled turbines were originally made by Denmark’s Nordtank Energy Group A/S and installed in 1993. Nordtank merged with Micon A/S in 1997 to form NEG Micon A/S, which Vestas agreed to buy in December 2003.

Obstacles to repower old sites include getting up to a dozen owners of each facility to agree and ensuring the plant can earn the same subsidized rate for energy.

“Even if you get better efficiency, if you lose your old power purchase agreement and replace it with a newer one with a lower tariff, what’s the point?,” Kenersys’ Chief Executive Officer Paulo Fernando Soares said in an interview in Chennai.

The waste generated by tearing down old windmills is another barrier. The eight 0.3-megawatt and two 0.55-megawatt Nordtank turbines dismantled by Gamesa sit at the site in a rusting heap, their rotor blades stacked atop one another. Lakshmi Machine Works hasn’t figured out how to dispose of them.

“It’s an important question. What happens to old blades?” said Andrew Garrad, president of GL Garrad Hassan, a wind consultant. “We produce blades which are difficult to recycle and reuse. It should be on our conscience.”

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-0...-foothold.html


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Old July 5th, 2011, 08:53 AM   #68
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Chennaiites looking up to solar energy..

- nearly-ten per cent-increase in the sale of solar devices in the city in the past one year.

- While solar energy utilisation for power generation may not be economic for individual households

- While regular solar water heaters cost up to Rs. 20,000, the new tube-shaped ones that absorb solar energy easily in 2-3 hours cost lesser

- “While solar water heaters have a payback time of 2 years, it takes 10 years to recover the capital cost of solar lighting system.

- A system of one kilo watt capacity will cost nearly Rs.2.2 lakh,” says Sikkander Amin, managing partner of Solarys Energy Solutions.

- But, if 1,000 houses instal water heaters, nearly six megawatt of electricity can be saved per year, he adds.

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper...cle2157179.ece
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Old July 18th, 2011, 01:26 AM   #69
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Cooum desal plant to produce power, water

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CHENNAI: In the backdrop of a severe power shortage in the state, Germany-based Traiton Global LLC has proposed a desalination plant on the Cooum river in the city, which could produce 600MW power and 75 million litres per day of clean water. A project plan has been submitted to the state government which has invited company officials from Germany to discuss the project and costs.

Government sources said a team from the company in Germany is likely to visit Chennai in the first week of August. The focus of this project is on producing clean water out from Cooum and also on energy production. "The company has proposed to set up its unit at the mouth of Cooum River where it flows into the Bay of Bengal," an official said.

According to the technical specifications of the project, water would be brought in from polluted Cooum River and then stored in a large reservoir prior to purification and enhancement. Then the water would be pressurised and purified in several stages. The toxins and pollutants would be gasified to feed a synthetic gas turbine that will generate power. The next stage will be a purification process that will create clean water, which will then be pumped to the final stage to get medical grade drinking water.

"We have already located the land, technology and sufficient funds for setting up the plant. We only need a 'buy back' guarantee for the power and water from the Tamil Nadu government," says S Manoharan, who represents Traiton Global.

Manoharan claimed that the proposed system will produce 600MW power and 75 million litres of drinking water per day. "The system will run round-the-clock throughout the year with low CO2 emissions," he said, adding that no outside fuel would be needed to produce power and drinking water.

"The project is not weather-dependent, and independent of any increase in prices of gas, diesel, petrol and wood," he said. Manoharan also claimed that the project would produce power at Rs 4.95 per unit – which would make it competitive with coal plants.
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/c...ow/9264773.cms
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Old July 18th, 2011, 03:38 AM   #70
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Sounds interesting. The Germans are always good at these.
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Old July 18th, 2011, 05:15 PM   #71
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Originally Posted by TShyam View Post
most important guarantee that they need from government is a forever polluted cooum. that is one oxymoronic plan.

this must be a jj benami or one of her cronies.
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Old July 18th, 2011, 05:18 PM   #72
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i guess we have some protocols to embed news & all that. as we can all see from my previous post, that is not very useful. if we add a gist of that message, it helps others as they start a chain.
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Old July 25th, 2011, 03:55 PM   #73
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Thermax, Amonix ink pact for photovoltaic technology

http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/...cle2293233.ece

Thermax Limited has entered into an agreement with California-based Amonix Inc. for bringing the new concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) technology for solar power generation to India. Under the agreement, Amonix will provide the solar power modules and technology for putting up power plants, while Thermax will be the Engineering, Procurement and Construction (EPC) partner to providing turnkey solutions to customers.

Amonix proposes to manufacture the CPV modules at the Flextronics Technologies plant in Chennai initially, and plans on building a separate facility in India when business starts picking up. The solar systems will be indigenised to the extent of 50:50 in the beginning, with a plan to localise up to 60% subsequently.

“Concentrated photovoltaics technology will be a game changer in solar power generation technologies because of the substantially high efficiency it offers,” Mr M S Unnikrishnan, Managing Director and CEO, Thermax said. The exclusive arrangement with Amonix will enable Thermax to bid for projects in India, he said, adding that the company will (help developers) bid for the next round of PPAs under the National Solar Mission (NSM) due to open in September.

Mr Brian Robertson, CEO, Amonix said that the technology originally developed for aerospace applications, has 38% module efficiency, and provides 29% post inverter power. The pole-mounted panels are fitted with dual-axis tracking systems, and require no water. The cost for setting up the CPV would be around Rs 10-12 crore per MW, he added.
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Old July 26th, 2011, 03:49 PM   #74
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Artificial Leaf
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0327191042.htm
..........Placed in a single gallon of water in a bright sunlight, the device could produce enough electricity to supply a house in a developing country with electricity for a day, Nocera said. It does so by splitting water into its two components, hydrogen and oxygen.

Earlier researchers used clean water.... but this one can use any water even our excretions. Which reminds me of abundant Coovam river water

Tata has already invested in this...
http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/20...tificial-leaf/


People like Kannan Sir or others who have oppurtunity to talk to the TN officials directly can pass on this message. TN govt. can cut down on one of the free schemes (which I guess the high court is already hearing a case to block it) and invest a little bit/join hands with TATA. Even if the technology fails which I believe it won't atleast it will create a "State moving towards new age" impression. Imagine these trees along Coovam .
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Old July 26th, 2011, 07:29 PM   #75
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Superb .... Solar energy is the future fuel of our world ... Happy that people and researchers are concentrating more on that ...

As you have told, people who have influence on TN govt. can share this idea with some one in top rung...
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Old July 27th, 2011, 09:58 AM   #76
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TShyam View Post
wow nice to imagine this kind of futuristic idea. i dont mind 75 million litres of potable water coming into Chennai from Cooum as long as they have no ebolas, marbughs, H1N1's etc...
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Old July 27th, 2011, 10:25 AM   #77
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wow nice to imagine this kind of futuristic idea. i dont mind 75 million litres of potable water coming into Chennai from Cooum as long as they have no ebolas, marbughs, H1N1's etc...
You mean that attu virus which Kamalhaasan flaunts in Dasavatharam ?
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Old July 27th, 2011, 10:31 AM   #78
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You mean that attu virus which Kamalhaasan flaunts in Dasavatharam ?
ebola was shown in the film outbreak. See thats the thing. We need to go global and not look at local examples.
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Old July 27th, 2011, 01:33 PM   #79
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Artificial Leaf
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0327191042.htm
..........Placed in a single gallon of water in a bright sunlight, the device could produce enough electricity to supply a house in a developing country with electricity for a day, Nocera said. It does so by splitting water into its two components, hydrogen and oxygen.

Earlier researchers used clean water.... but this one can use any water even our excretions. Which reminds me of abundant Coovam river water

Tata has already invested in this...
http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/20...tificial-leaf/


People like Kannan Sir or others who have oppurtunity to talk to the TN officials directly can pass on this message. TN govt. can cut down on one of the free schemes (which I guess the high court is already hearing a case to block it) and invest a little bit/join hands with TATA. Even if the technology fails which I believe it won't atleast it will create a "State moving towards new age" impression. Imagine these trees along Coovam .
I saw a presentation by some technologists on a similar one.It was called Artificial Tree and it looked a rectangular Arch. I feel that it is still a long way to go for commercial applications.
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Old July 27th, 2011, 03:13 PM   #80
vinodgopal
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the best thing we can do is try and invent a gadget that converts mosquitoes, flies and cockroaches into electricity. Chennai has a huge abundance in bugs and this natural resource must not be wasted. Just my 2 cents
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