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Old August 26th, 2014, 03:34 PM   #1
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TRANSPORT | Official Birmingham Cycling Thread

TRANSPORT | Official Birmingham Cycling Thread

We have a thread for transport and sub threads for our regions airport, metro and sprint, it about time we have a thread dedicated towards the development of cycling in our conurbation.

Quote:
Government shifts cycling up a gear

From:Prime Minister's Office, 10 Downing Street, Department for Transport, The Rt Hon David Cameron MP and The Rt Hon Patrick McLoughlin MP History:Published 12 August 2013 Part of:Making transport more accessible to all, Making roads safer, Improving local transport, Transport, Local government and UK economy

A nationwide drive to promote cycling in cities and national parks across England will be launched today.
Cyclists in a city. Photo: Nick Ansell/PA Images.
Photo: Nick Ansell/PA Images.
The Prime Minister announces the biggest ever single injection of cash for the country alongside plans to make roads safer for those on two wheels.

£77 million will be divided between Manchester, Leeds, Birmingham, Newcastle, Bristol, Cambridge, Oxford and Norwich, while the New Forest, Peak District, South Downs and Dartmoor will each share a slice of £17 million funding for national parks. With local contributions, the total new funding for cycling is £148 million between now and 2015.

The announcement includes a commitment from the government to cut red tape that can stifle cycle-friendly road design and to encourage changes to the way roads are built or altered. Councils will be expected to up their game to deliver infrastructure that takes cycling into account from the design stage.

Birmingham - DfT funding £17 million
Local contribution £7.3 million

Birmingham Cycle Revolution is a 20-year strategy to make cycling a mainstream form of transport across the city. It aims to have cycling accounting for 5% of all journeys within 10 years and 10% within 20 years. This fund will accelerate this ambition through the creation of the 1st phase of a city-wide strategic cycle route network along radial corridors initially extending 20 minutes cycling time from the city centre. Key features include 71 miles of new cycle routes, improvements to 59 miles of existing cycle routes, segregated cycle facilities, lower speed limits, off-road routes using canals and green spaces and secure cycle parking and supported by a programme of smarter choices measures.
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/g...ling-up-a-gear

Quote:
Birmingham Cycle Revolution



For details of our current cycle route consultations, please visit www.birmingham.gov.uk/bcrconsultation

On 30th January 2013, Secretary of State Norman Baker announced that the Department for Transport would be investing up to £42 million in cycling infrastructure through the Cycle City Ambition Grant. This funding runs until April 2015. Birmingham is one of the cities eligible to apply for this funding and the City Council, with the support of numerous partners, has now submitted a detailed bid for £17 million.

We want to deliver an ambitious 20 year plan to support cyclists across our city. The Birmingham Cycle Revolution will deliver a step-change in levels of cycling and our Cycle City Ambition Grant application builds on key cycling projects such as Bike North Birmingham and our LSTF Smart Network, Smarter Choices project.

Working with partners across the city, our plan aims to make cycling an integral part of our transport network with cycling part of everyday life and mass participation a reality. We want to improve our routes, making the city a safe and attractive environment for cycling and walking and delivering an inclusive network for all. Our transformational agenda will play a key role in taking Birmingham forward as an economically thriving city with sustainable active travel at its heart.

Our application to the Cycle City Ambition Grant forms the first stage in the Birmingham Cycle Revolution. It focuses on investment in cycling infrastructure and facilities, building on our existing cycle network, making the best use of our canal network and green corridors and developing a comprehensive on-road network offering significantly improved cycling conditions. This will improve the overall cycling experience, increase participation, improve access to employment and training, improve health and activity and decrease car dependency.

Our full bid can be downloaded below. If you have a queries or comments, you can get in touch with the Bid Team at [email protected], or 0121 303 7249.



PDF BCR Promotional Leaflet (Size: 1.20 Mb Type: PDF )

Our Vision is to make cycling an everyday way to travel in Birmingham over the next 20 years. We want 5% of all trips in the city to be made by bike by 2023 and to double this again to 10% by 2033. This will help to make our city healthier, greener, safer and less congested.

We will start by improving cycling facilities within a 20-minute cycling time of Birmingham city centre, with 95km of improvements to existing routes and 115km of new cycle routes. We will:
  • Improve cycling conditions on popular routes into the city centre;
  • Provide quiet cycling routes and 20mph areas within residential areas;
  • Upgrade towpaths on canals;
  • Develop new cycling green routes through parks and open spaces;
  • Improve local links to cycle routes;
  • Provide new secure cycle parking hubs; and
  • Develop cycle loan and hire schemes to make it easier for people to get started.
This will be supported by the Big Birmingham Bikes programme of free bikes, cycle training, and activities with employers, schools and communities to encourage cycling and the Birmingham Cycle Rewards app. There will be many opportunities for people in Birmingham to join in.

Birmingham City Council and its partners have already begun to deliver improvements. Works on canal towpath routes, green routes and local links have started.

Over the Summer 2014, we will consult on cycling improvements on key routes into the city centre and 20mph areas. Cycling improvements will be built throughout 2014 and 2015. See all current consultations.

For more information on the project, progress updates or how you can get involved please contact the Birmingham Cycle Revolution team by email at [email protected], tweet us @BhamCityCouncil #bcr or like Birmingham Cycle Revolution on Facebook.


BCR Overview map

PDF BCR Leaflet 2014 (Size: 629 Kb Type: PDF )
http://www.birmingham.gov.uk/bcr
http://www.birmingham.gov.uk/cs/Sate...FInlineWrapper
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Old August 26th, 2014, 04:10 PM   #2
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Pedal power to the people: Brum's £24m cycling boost

Last years local news article:

Quote:
Pedal power to the people: Brum's £24m cycling boost
Aug 12, 2013 07:00 By Mary Griffin

Mail helps secure £17m funds to add to city council's £7m investment in making Birmingham as bike-friendly as Amsterdam


Cyclists in Birmingham city centre

The Birmingham Mail has won its battle to help secure £17 MILLION for a massive cycling revolution.

Today the city council announced that its bid to make Birmingham as bike-friendly as Amsterdam has been approved by the Department for Transport.

And civic leaders have been quick to praise the part played by The Mail’s four-month Cycle City campaign.

In all, more than £24 million – our own council has pledged over £7 million – will be spent on the scheme over the next two years.

There has been a nervous wait for news of the bid, with an announcement originally expected in June.

But Birmingham can now push ahead with a two-year plan to triple the number of city cyclists, revamp canal towpaths, create or upgrade 130 miles of off and on-road routes and launch cycle-friendly schemes such as London’s “Boris bikes”.

Birmingham Mail editor David Brookes said: “Today’s announcement is wonderful news for the city, the council and the people of Brum.It could lead to a revolution on our roads, offering safer routes and encouraging commuters to feel that cycling to work is a genuine option.”

Chris Tunstall, council director of sustainability and transportation, said: “I think people will be gobsmacked when they see this – and not just people around the West Midlands.

“In our early discussions with the Department for Transport they just didn’t think Birmingham was in any way, shape or form up to this challenge. We’ve turned a massive corner, not just to get this bid but to overcome the negative impressions that have been formed about us over the years.”

The Mail understands today’s official announcement was delayed because government transport chiefs were so impressed with submitted bids they sought extra funds so rival projects in both Birmingham and Manchester could be rolled out.

Mr Tunstall added: “From all our partners – the CTC, Sustrans, the Birmingham Mail, a lot of businesses and the Business Improvement Districts – there has been a real groundswell of support giving a collective feeling that now is the right time.”

Since launching our Cycle City campaign four months ago, the Birmingham Mail has featured scores of city cyclists.

We’ve met volunteers leading family rides, enthusiasts recycling old bikes - like Cycle Chain in the gas street Basin, cyclists mapping the city’s network, members of Europe’s biggest BMX club and women from ethnic minorities who have tied up their hijab veils to get on two wheels.


View gallery
""""""""
Birmingham Cycle City Expo
View gallery


The whole city has buzzed with the prospect of a bike revolution since hosting a national Cycle Expo four months ago.

Today Birmingham’s dream became a reality.

It’s been tense, with rumours rife that we had lost out to Manchester, home of the National Cycling Centre.

A Manchester Lib Dem MP jumped the gun, posting online the northern city had been successful in its bid – a bombshell that left Brummie bikers reeling.

A further blow was dealt last week when Cycling Weekly magazine speculated the money would be shared between Manchester, Leicester and Cambridge.

Coun James McKay, cabinet member for a “green, safe and smart city”, said: “You always get speculation over these bids and the level of speculation is a measure of the interest in the project.”

He added: “I’m never interested in the idea of rivalry between Birmingham and Manchester.

“They are two brilliant, leading cities, both keen on the sustainability agenda and both eager to get residents cycling. This bid is good news for everybody.”

Coun McKay, who first came to Birmingham as a student in 1997, has seen a marked shift in the city’s attitude to cycling.

He said: “I only started cycling to work a year or two ago after, like a lot of people, having a bike go rusty in the shed.

“But we’ve seen some really positive moves recently and we’ve done some fantastic work around leisure cycling.”

With £24.3 million to spend between now and September 2015 – our council has weighed-in with £7 million – work will start “as soon as possible”.

The council has already used the current six-week closure of the city centre A38 tunnels to promote bike commuting, leading rides from four corners of Birmingham into its centre, spreading the slogan “Greener, Faster, Fitter” and giving away 200 hi-vis vests.

Now, the two-year plan will focus on a radius reaching to Quinton in the west, Stechford in the east, Perry Barr in the north and Stirchley in the south. There will be major improvements to the network within a 20-minute ride of the city centre in all directions.

The lion’s share of the £24.3 million will be ploughed into infrastructure, creating 70 miles of new cycle routes and upgrading a further 60 miles.

Eight of the major arteries into the city will see new fast cycle lanes created along main roads or shared-use footways, and Birmingham’s canal towpaths will undergo a major revamp to create an all-weather, off-road network.

The rest of the money will be spent on improved signage, parking and bike hire schemes.

The council wants to build on its successful Bike North Birmingham project and community organisations around the city are already setting up their own versions. Northfield Ecocentre has launched Cycle South Brum, and Gear Up social enterprise is aiming to start a similar scheme for the east of the city.

Chris Tunstall, Birmingham’s director of sustainability and transport, said: “We’re hoping to work with local manufacturers in and around the city and the West Midlands to try and grow what was, at one point, a manufacturing base and is now concentrated on a really niche market.”

He added: “We are an old industrial city, founded very much on the car.

“So once we demonstrate how well we’ve made the transformation into a cycling city no other city in the UK will have an excuse.

“People will see a lot of big changes over the next two years – improvements in signage, cycling facilities, shared space routes and cycle lanes on highways and footpaths, and significant improvements to canal towpaths.”

Birmingham is currently languishing at the bottom of the UK’s league table for cycling, with around one per cent of journeys in Birmingham made by pedal power.

But over the next two years, the number of bike journeys is set to triple to meet a target of five per cent by 2015 and ten percent by 2023. In Manchester and Nottingham more than three per cent of journeys are already being made by bike and in Bristol the figure is closer to seven.

But the collective community ambition and today’s multimillion success are inspiring council chiefs to aim high, turn the tide and make Birmingham into a national leader.

Chris said: “The truth is, we want to be better than anybody else in the country.”

Birmingham Mail editor David Brookes said: “We were keen to launch this campaign to reflect the growing positive attitude in the city that more can be done to promote cycling. Cycling is an activity which can transform lives. It gets people out of their cars, provides exercise and has a really beneficial effect.

“This funding could lead to a revolution on the roads, offering safer routes and the chance to make commuters feel cycling to work is a genuine option.”
http://www.birminghammail.co.uk/news...-boost-5698001



Birmingham: Cyclist will gets £24m cash injection for new cycle routes
Published on 12 Aug 2013
This piece first broadcast on 12 Aug 2013. Televised on UK's regional television BBC1 West Midlands. Programme (Program) -- Midlands Today.



Birmingham: Cycling project is 'fantastic news' for economy
Published on 12 Aug 2013
This piece first broadcast on 12 Aug 2013. Televised on UK's regional television ITV Central. Programme (Program) -- ITV News Central.

Last edited by neon18; August 26th, 2014 at 07:34 PM. Reason: Added embedded new clips
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Old August 26th, 2014, 04:22 PM   #3
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Birmingham Cycle Revolution Delivery Schedule
8th August 2014



http://www.birmingham.gov.uk/cs/Sate...14.pdf
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Old August 26th, 2014, 04:35 PM   #4
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Quote:
Birmingham to benefit from railway station cycle scheme
BY KRISK – AUGUST 21, 2013
POSTED IN: CLLR MCKAY, NEWS

An innovative £140,000 scheme which allows rail passengers using Birmingham’s three city centre stations to hire bicycles and continue their journeys by pedal power is to be launched later this year.

Transport authority Centro has teamed up with Birmingham City Council to provide three docks housing state-of-the-art Brompton folding bicycles at locations near the city’s New Street, Snow Hill and Moor Street railway stations.

The docks, which will each contain 20 of the iconic British-built bikes, will be installed this autumn after Centro and local rail operator London Midland secured £90,000 funding from the Department for Transport’s Cycle-Rail Fund.

Birmingham City Council has contributed the remaining £50,000.

The docks are designed to make it easier for people travelling into the city for business or leisure meetings to travel from the station to their destination.

Each bicycle is stored in its own individual bay which is opened using a code sent to a user’s phone.

Cllr Judith Rowley, Centro’s lead member for green and accessible transport, said: “This is a really inventive way to help people travelling in and out of the city get to their destinations, quickly and easily.

“Taking two wheels can play a key role in speeding up journeys and this is just one of a number of improvements we are working on to better connect cycling with train travel.

“Making it easier for people working in the city to pick up a bicycle, can eliminate the expense of taking a taxi or wasted time spent sitting in traffic.”

The Brompton Docks which will be the first installed in the West Midlands and will build on the wider investment being made by Centro and Birmingham City Council in improving cycling facilities across the city.

To use the self-service rental system, users are given a unique PIN code. A text message including this code, details of the dock location and when a bicycle is required must then be sent to a special phone number.

A response is sent to the user’s phone detailing which bay will contain their bike and an access code, which once entered releases the cycle.

Cllr James McKay, Cabinet Member for a Green, Safe and Smart city at Birmingham City Council, said: “We are keen to transform Birmingham’s facilities to place the city at the forefront of cycling locations.

“This project is one significant step towards that goal, as the Brompton Docks will help people who commute around the city to join-up the various elements of their travel plans in a sustainable and flexible way.”

Rentals will cost £2.50 per day for frequent users and £5.00 for occasional users.

London Midland Managing Director, Patrick Verwer added: “We are keen to encourage our passengers to combine their rail journeys with sustainable methods of onward transport.

“We are therefore very pleased that our successful application to the Government’s Cycle-Rail Scheme means that we have been able to contribute £90,000 to this exciting project.”

For more information on Brompton Docks visit: www.bromptondock.co.uk
http://birminghamnewsroom.com/2013/0...-cycle-scheme/
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Old August 26th, 2014, 04:41 PM   #5
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Brompton Bike Hire has officially launched in Birmingham today.

Quote:
Brompton Bike Hire has officially launched in Birmingham today.



Brompton Bike Hire, an ingenious folding bike hire scheme, has officially launched in Birmingham today (26/08). The scheme will enable people to hire bicycles from the Brompton dock outside Moor Street station and use pedal power for part, or all, of their journey.



The fully automated Brompton dock is solar powered and contains 20 purple Brompton bikes.

The iconic British designed and built Brompton bikes are an innovative solution to Birmingham City Council’s current and future mobility challenges, facilitating behaviour change and reducing carbon emissions.

The bikes are ideal for commuters, business trips and leisure users with the fast and easy folding design making it possible to take the bikes into the home, office and on public transport, even at peak times. The portable nature of the bikes allows users to keep the bikes with them at all times, reducing the risk of theft.

The dock outside Moor Street is the first of a network of docks to be installed in the City Centre. Docks outside Snow Hill and New Street Stations will be installed in due course. The scheme, costing £140,000 for the first three docks, has been jointly funded by Birmingham City Council, Centro and local rail operator London Midland. Further funding has also been secured, through Birmingham Cycle Revolution, for docks with possible locations being Brindley Place, Aston University and Millennium Point.

People wishing to hire the bikes must register online at http://bromptondock.co.uk There are two tariffs to choose from: Frequent and Leisure. Each has an annual membership fee and a daily hire charge from as little as £2.50.

Watch this video to see how the Brompton Bike Hire scheme works



If you’re in the City Centre today - Head over to Moor Street Station for more information from the teams at Brompton Bike Hire and Birmingham City Council Smarter Choices until 3PM.



(Image: Anne Shaw - Head of Transportation Services at Birmingham City Council/Birmingham City Council Smarter Choices)
http://birminghamupdates.com/post/95...ly-launched-in
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Old August 26th, 2014, 04:58 PM   #6
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Not quite a Boris Bike but hey ho. Lets see if it takes off better than the car sharing company... what was that called again??? 2 go?
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Old August 26th, 2014, 11:38 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neon18 View Post
TRANSPORT | Official Birmingham Cycling Thread

We have a thread for transport and sub threads for our regions airport, metro and sprint, it about time we have a thread dedicated towards the development of cycling in our conurbation.
I like this Idea, can Woody or someone rename the other Transport threads, maybe -

TRANSPORT | General Thread
TRANSPORT | Official Metro Thread
TRANSPORT | Official Sprint Thread
TRANSPORT | Official Airport (BHX) Thread

Forum needs a good cleaning.
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Old August 27th, 2014, 12:17 AM   #8
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Not forgetting:

TRANSPORT | Official Birmingham High Speed Two Thread
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Old August 27th, 2014, 12:21 AM   #9
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Hmm... Brompton bikes. Would much prefer what Taipei and London has.. surely this cannot be difficult...

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Old August 27th, 2014, 04:13 PM   #10
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I'd prefer a row of bikes than a clunky metal shed.
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Old September 11th, 2014, 11:33 PM   #11
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Quote:
Social media backlash after Birmingham councillor dubs cycling 'discriminatory'
Sep 11, 2014 12:29 By Graeme Brown-BP

Coun Deirdre Alden (Con, Edgbaston) made the comments at the Edgbaston District committee responding to a £23 million scheme intended to transform cycling in Birmingham

Tim Ireland/PA Wire
A Birmingham councillor’s claims that cycling is “discriminatory” have drawn derision from across social media today.

Coun Deirdre Alden (Con, Edgbaston) made the comments at the Edgbaston District committee responding to a £23 million scheme intended to transform cycling in Birmingham.

The councillor said the “vast majority” of cyclists on the city’s roads are “young, white men”, adding: “It is a discriminatory form of transport .”

The views, revealed on the front page of this week’s Birmingham Post, have been mocked throughout the city and beyond on social media.


Dutch councillor Martina Huijsmans tweeted: “lol! Can’t believe this! In The Netherlands people cycle with normal clothes on and without helmets. Even the prime minister!”

Closer to home, Russell Williams said on the Post’s Facebook page : “I am somewhat disgusted by this statement. It looks narrow minded and old fashioned. Has the councillor not visited other cities where there is a proper cycle path network and seen the diverse mix of people who adopt cycling as the preferred mode of transport and further, if the cycle path network is to “Get White young men” out of their cars is that not a result for everyone as less cars, less pollution and less congestion for everyone so all are winners.”

Fellow Facebook commentor Rob Mills added: “Is this some kind of wind up? Cause tell you what it’s working.”
http://www.birminghampost.co.uk/news...ingham-7754672
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Old September 12th, 2014, 01:10 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neon18 View Post
http://www.birminghammail.co.uk/news...-bikes-7754949

I tell you this much, this made me furious for so many reasons!

If the comments are accurate, I feel this belongs on the "Birmingham Reputation" thread never mind its cycling one. Do people really still say these sorts of things?

I'm hopeful that you'll all tell me how unrepresentative she is!

Despite having the largest bike hire outside London, Liverpool got a big fat zero from that cycling fund. What use we could have put £23m to!
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Old September 12th, 2014, 01:28 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Centurio View Post
http://www.birminghammail.co.uk/news...-bikes-7754949

I tell you this much, this made me furious for so many reasons!

If the comments are accurate, I feel this belongs on the "Birmingham Reputation" thread never mind its cycling one. Do people really still say these sorts of things?

I'm hopeful that you'll all tell me how unrepresentative she is!

Despite having the largest bike hire outside London, Liverpool got a big fat zero from that cycling fund. What use we could have put £23m to!
Agreed, most idiotic comment I've seen in a long time. The point of cycling is to encourage everyone to cycle, be they a white male, Pakistani woman or half-Irish-half-Chinese kid going to school. A bike is a bloody vehicle, not a political statement. What an ignorant comment.
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Old September 12th, 2014, 01:36 PM   #14
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I doubt that was the point she was making in saying that statement. I think she made a factual point regarding it's benefit for the majority of people in the city based on the typical profile of a cyclist.

This document https://www.tfl.gov.uk/cdn/static/cm...-potential.pdf from TFL states the following

Quote:
A simple comparison of those making current and potentially cyclable trips shows that, whilst frequent cyclists are typically white, male, between 25 to 44, and on a higher than average income, much of the potential comes from women, ethnic minorities, younger and older people, and those on a lower income. Nevertheless, there remains significant potential for growth amongst existing
cyclists and people similar to them.
So in what she is saying she is factually correct. As we can't see what else was said, i'd imagine her point was rather more of, would this money and the improvements enable more people to cycle or could it be used in a different way to get people out of single occupancy cars as currently cycling is a barrier. Although that is not to say that her assertion that it is a discriminatory form of transport is right.
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Last edited by djay; September 12th, 2014 at 01:44 PM.
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Old September 12th, 2014, 01:53 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djay View Post
I doubt that was the point she was making in saying that statement. I think she made a factual point regarding it's benefit for the majority of people in the city based on the typical profile of a cyclist.

This document https://www.tfl.gov.uk/cdn/static/cm...-potential.pdf from TFL states the following

So in what she is saying she is factually correct. As we can't see what else was said, i'd imagine her point was rather more of, would this money and the improvements enable more people to cycle or could it be used in a different way to get people out of single occupancy cars as currently cycling is a barrier.
There's absolutely nothing wrong with cycling (for anyone, even many non able-bodied people using specially adapted cycles). To be blunt, I couldn't give a rat's backside what proportion of which ethnicities use bikes or not. It's of zero relevance. If the ability to ride a bike and the availability of a bike is there, it's there for everyone.

I'm not imagining what her point is, I'm reading her words as reported:
http://www.birminghammail.co.uk/news...-bikes-7754949

And I'm appalled.
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Old September 12th, 2014, 02:28 PM   #16
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She didn't say there was anything wrong with cycling in the way i'm reading that you interpret it.

Her words were
Quote:
“The vast majority of cyclists on our roads are young, white men,” she said.

She added that, while there are exceptions, “most elderly people are not going to cycle, and it would be dangerous for them to start on our streets now”.

And she added that disabled people do not benefit from cycling and that “women of any ethnic group who wish to wear modest clothing, and I count myself in that category, are not going to cycle. It is a discriminatory form of transport”.
1st point she made is supported by the TFL document, 2nd point (depends on what she means by elderly... i'd think anyone up to say 75 would cycle but obviously many elderly are retired so maybe that is leisure rather than day to day. 3 point as you said if the bikes are adapted then fine. 4th point is an issue for the individual who will or wont cycle.

I'd say it is a niche of people who tend to use it regularly rather than discriminatory but inherently her words observations.Whether or not money should be spent now to encourage groups who don't use it or if it should be spent when take up increases is a different issue IMHO
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Old September 12th, 2014, 02:53 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djay View Post
I doubt that was the point she was making in saying that statement. I think she made a factual point regarding it's benefit for the majority of people in the city based on the typical profile of a cyclist.

This document https://www.tfl.gov.uk/cdn/static/cm...-potential.pdf from TFL states the following



So in what she is saying she is factually correct. As we can't see what else was said, i'd imagine her point was rather more of, would this money and the improvements enable more people to cycle or could it be used in a different way to get people out of single occupancy cars as currently cycling is a barrier. Although that is not to say that her assertion that it is a discriminatory form of transport is right.
No, she's factually incorrect. If, as you have pointed out already, the largest potential for recruiting new cyclists 'comes from women, ethnic minorities, younger and older people, and those on a lower income', then a scheme designed to help encourage cycling in Birmingham is, by definition, primarily going to help those groups realise their potential to cycle. What is in fact clear is that young, white men are already cycling anyway, regardless of initiatives to promote cycling. The phrase 'women, ethnic minorities, younger and older people, and those on a lower income' is so ludicrously broad-brush anyway, at that point we might as well call them what they are: people.
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Old September 12th, 2014, 03:02 PM   #18
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She didn't say there was anything wrong with cycling in the way i'm reading that you interpret it.

Her words were
Quote:
“The vast majority of cyclists on our roads are young, white men,” she said.

She added that, while there are exceptions, “most elderly people are not going to cycle, and it would be dangerous for them to start on our streets now”.

And she added that disabled people do not benefit from cycling and that “women of any ethnic group who wish to wear modest clothing, and I count myself in that category, are not going to cycle. It is a discriminatory form of transport”.
1st point she made is supported by the TFL document, 2nd point (depends on what she means by elderly... i'd think anyone up to say 75 would cycle but obviously many elderly are retired so maybe that is leisure rather than day to day. 3 point as you said if the bikes are adapted then fine. 4th point is an issue for the individual who will or wont cycle.

I'd say it is a niche of people who tend to use it regularly rather than discriminatory but inherently her words observations.Whether or not money should be spent now to encourage groups who don't use it or if it should be spent when take up increases is a different issue IMHO
What does the colour of peoples' skin and their gender have to do with whether cycling is worthy of £23m spending or not?

As for the pathetic comment about "modest clothing" well a) you know what, she could always wear clothes that are practical if she chose to, so anyone who uses this as an excuse is excluding themselves, not being excluded, and moreover B) has this individual never seen any old photos of Victorian era women on their bikes?

Pointing to tfl surveys doesn't make the comments any less offensive, nor - frankly - any less embarrasing for Birmingham.
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Old September 12th, 2014, 05:28 PM   #19
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What does the colour of peoples' skin and their gender have to do with whether cycling is worthy of £23m spending or not?
Exactly. The aim of encouraging more people to cycle is to get people out of cars. It's utterly irrelevant what types of people are cycling, the important thing is the amount.

The entire notion of "discrimination" is getting thrown around more and more by idiots like her, to the point where it starts losing any meaning, The Boy Who Cried Wolf style.
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Old September 12th, 2014, 05:30 PM   #20
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Exactly. The aim of encouraging more people to cycle is to get people out of cars. It's utterly irrelevant what types of people are cycling, the important thing is the amount.

The entire notion of "discrimination" is getting thrown around more and more by idiots like her, to the point where it starts losing any meaning, The Boy Who Cried Wolf style.
It's a political tactic to appear 'in touch' which lost its value decades ago. Those of us who are actually 'in touch' have moved beyond this crap.
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