daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Forums > Architecture > European Classic Architecture and Landscapes

European Classic Architecture and Landscapes All related to historical buildings and landscapes of the old world.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old February 10th, 2016, 05:19 AM   #2461
Urbanista1
Here and Now
 
Urbanista1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,426
Likes (Received): 5287

new meets old meets newer in Wola



thanks antygjon
__________________
ten rząd wstrząsa podstawami naszej państwowości i funkcjonowania społeczeństwa. Natomiast większość społeczeństwa śpi, nie zwraca uwagi, co się dzieje i trzeba je z tego snu obudzić - Piotr S


Warsaw Post-War Reconstruction to Present
Urbanista1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old February 10th, 2016, 05:59 AM   #2462
FreeeSpirit
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 94
Likes (Received): 109

Quote:
Originally Posted by Avifauna View Post
I agree. That building is awful
Your personal opinion is not of any interest and does not add anything to this thread. Can you explain why you think this building is awful and qualify your statement?
__________________

rychlik liked this post
FreeeSpirit no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 10th, 2016, 07:57 PM   #2463
intervention
planning inaction
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,033

A question about the effect of the Dekkert-side renovation of Rynek Starego Miasta.

From what I understand, the current colour scheme reflects the original post-World War II reconstruction scheme before it was supplanted by the more "vibrant" colour scheme we saw from the 1970's until recently.

Will there be a renovation of the other sides and if so, will there be a similar approach in returning a more authentic colour scheme for the other sides? Some of the one-off renovations (for example, kamienica Książąt Mazowieckich) were in keeping with the previous colour scheme that I recall but the building next door (renovated at the same time) looks much different now.
intervention no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 10th, 2016, 09:34 PM   #2464
Urbanista1
Here and Now
 
Urbanista1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,426
Likes (Received): 5287

in the article attached (in Polish) it explains the colour scheme rationale in detail. but to save you the effort, it is based on restoring the post war scheme...."przywracając im stonowaną kolorystykę z lat 50., zmienioną podczas niezbyt fortunnych remontˇw w latach 70. i 80".

even in cases where some original pre-war polychromies of Zofii Stryjeńska was found as on #34 they decided to superimpose the newer socreal inspired version scheme sans polichromie.

however one of the most original survivors Kamienica "Pod Murzynkiem" at #36 had its original 17th century sgrafitto decoration and colour scheme restored. "ma najbogatszy wystrˇj fasady ze wszystkich domˇw w tej pierzei. Niemal całą elewację przykrywa wielkie czarno-żˇłte sgraffito o motywach geometrycznych (jest rekonstrukcją dekoracji z XVII w.). Ekipa firmy Monument Service remontująca fasadę musiała je częściowo odtworzyć..."

#42 is a return to the post war version with new sgraffito decioration.

as to future plans, not sure. I think this rationale makes sense where a fašade had to be rebuilt, but if the fašade is an original survivor, I like the idea of making an exception and at least displaying in one area as at kamienica Gizińska #29 (image below) the original fresco decorations while upper floors (rebuilt) received new polychromies. If those buildings deemed original postwar maintained their original pre-war colour scheme, then I suppose based on this rationale that will be restored as well. I would personally prefer with survivors that these buildings were restored to their original colour schemes, if that can be found under the layers of original sections of fašade, as with St. Martin's church.



__________________
ten rząd wstrząsa podstawami naszej państwowości i funkcjonowania społeczeństwa. Natomiast większość społeczeństwa śpi, nie zwraca uwagi, co się dzieje i trzeba je z tego snu obudzić - Piotr S


Warsaw Post-War Reconstruction to Present
Urbanista1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 12th, 2016, 05:32 PM   #2465
rychlik
BANNED
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 6,809
Likes (Received): 6603

Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeeSpirit View Post
Your personal opinion is not of any interest and does not add anything to this thread. Can you explain why you think this building is awful and qualify your statement?
I am curious myself.
rychlik no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 12th, 2016, 05:43 PM   #2466
Marbur66
Registered User
 
Marbur66's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,255
Likes (Received): 10159

Quote:
Originally Posted by rychlik View Post
I am curious myself.
I will add that while I don't think it's awful, it doesn't fit with the surrounding buildings near the castle. Everything else is at least 'old-looking.' My personal opinion is that a classic-style looking replica would have been more natural for the area, but whatever. Still looks ok.
__________________
"We rarely find that people have good sense unless they agree with us."
Marbur66 está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old February 13th, 2016, 01:02 AM   #2467
rychlik
BANNED
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 6,809
Likes (Received): 6603

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marbur66 View Post
I will add that while I don't think it's awful, it doesn't fit with the surrounding buildings near the castle. Everything else is at least 'old-looking.' My personal opinion is that a classic-style looking replica would have been more natural for the area, but whatever. Still looks ok.
What was there before?
rychlik no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 13th, 2016, 02:44 PM   #2468
Marbur66
Registered User
 
Marbur66's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,255
Likes (Received): 10159

Quote:
Originally Posted by rychlik View Post
What was there before?
I have no idea.
__________________
"We rarely find that people have good sense unless they agree with us."
Marbur66 está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old February 13th, 2016, 05:08 PM   #2469
Urbanista1
Here and Now
 
Urbanista1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,426
Likes (Received): 5287

nothing just a parking lot since WWII, a few pages back you will see what was there pre-war.
__________________
ten rząd wstrząsa podstawami naszej państwowości i funkcjonowania społeczeństwa. Natomiast większość społeczeństwa śpi, nie zwraca uwagi, co się dzieje i trzeba je z tego snu obudzić - Piotr S


Warsaw Post-War Reconstruction to Present
Urbanista1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 13th, 2016, 07:28 PM   #2470
Mruczek
Registered cat
 
Mruczek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Outside Blue Banana
Posts: 10,723
Likes (Received): 14171

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marbur66 View Post
I will add that while I don't think it's awful, it doesn't fit with the surrounding buildings near the castle. Everything else is at least 'old-looking.'
Don't worry. It will be old-looking after 5-10 years of "breathing" Warsaw air, especially the walls. Btw, few buildings to the right (corner of Podwale and Kapitulna) there is actually similar Stalinist "dachshund", which blended all right. Close examination reveals, of course, that it comes from 1950s but at the first look it's just good architecture of context. And Senatorska 2/4 is also basically the corporative re-iteration of Stalinist architecture of context. I think in 10 years nobody would feel that something doesn't fit.

The bigger problem is with the roof. Firstly there were plans to make it green copper, but apparently conservationists objected and now we've got this grey crap, which is neither modern, nor historicist and it really spoils the picture. Not to mention skylights in the roof, which are simply barbarious
__________________
We shape our buildings; thereafter they shape us. Winston Churchill
Z archiwum Mruczka:
Buk Miłosław Szamotuły
Barcelona Budapeszt Grodno Kowno Madryt Moskwa Ukraina

Last edited by Mruczek; February 13th, 2016 at 07:33 PM.
Mruczek no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 13th, 2016, 08:26 PM   #2471
Urbanista1
Here and Now
 
Urbanista1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,426
Likes (Received): 5287

yes indeed, the conservators failed with the roof, cooper would have been better and the mass of the roof facing Plac Zamkowy is too big. But they can re-clad the roof at some point and add some elements that will break the mass of the roof, this will improve it somewhat. I've been harping about this roof from the beginning on the Polish side, too bad it was ignored.
__________________
ten rząd wstrząsa podstawami naszej państwowości i funkcjonowania społeczeństwa. Natomiast większość społeczeństwa śpi, nie zwraca uwagi, co się dzieje i trzeba je z tego snu obudzić - Piotr S


Warsaw Post-War Reconstruction to Present
Urbanista1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 13th, 2016, 08:27 PM   #2472
Mruczek
Registered cat
 
Mruczek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Outside Blue Banana
Posts: 10,723
Likes (Received): 14171

Quote:
Originally Posted by Urbanista1 View Post
the example you cited Canary Islands is a place I would rarely want to go, but that's me, no cultural value. that's why I prefer Greece to combine relaxation with culture. Tourists that go to London won't get any rest either or Paris has no beach from what I recall.
Check up how many % of GDP accounts to tourism in Spain (or Canary Islands) and how many in the UK, we can talk then.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Urbanista1 View Post
People do expect value and ease of getting there. In that sense Warsaw has lots to see and compared to latter cities cited excellent value, meals and tickets to shows much cheaper. I saw Aida and Madam Butterfly in Warsaw last year for $20 per ticket.
Well, these are quite typical conditions for any Central European city, from Tallin to Zagreb, inclusively. Ease of access, ridiculously low prices (for Western European, it's not so ridiculous for locals), lots of geek things to see and flavour of, how Chamberlain had put it: "faraway country we know nothing about".

If you're American it applies to nearly whole Yurop

Quote:
Originally Posted by Urbanista1 View Post
And Warsaw also has many historic areas
No, comparing to most of CE cities - it doesn't. Budapest or Praha have "many historic areas". Warsaw have one reconstructed historic area (with buildings to ca. 1830) surrounded by the sea of commieblocks. It simply doesn't have 19th (or even 20th) century proper city centre. Deal with it.

And (which is much harder to deal with) it's unlikely it ever will have, because the next and next empty plots of land are being filled without any plan and desire to create good public space. Sometimes it is actually quite good architecture they're filled in. But it does not create the city.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Urbanista1 View Post
It's the sameness, lack of unique landmarks that got us lost. All very charming of course, but the same charming experience.
If you say that there are no landmarks in Bruxelles, Amsterdam or Paris and there are in Warsaw, it probably means you just know Warsaw better than BXL, AMS or Paris.

And that is the reason why you get lost in them, not the apparent Warsaw navigation merits. Although the city is quite easy to navigate, I admit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Urbanista1 View Post
In Warsaw you get a few different city experiences in one and yes one of them not particularly charming, the commie block suburbs.
The problem are not suburbs. The problem is the commie blocks in Warsaw are eveywhere. Especially in the city centre and Western Approaches. Which buries deep any dreams of creating city. Either city or commie blocks. The only result of trying to create city out of commie blocks is even more chaotic area of commieblocks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Urbanista1 View Post
But the commie block Zelazna Brama is starting to create some exciting and yes jarring juxtaposition with the old kamienice and the new infill that is trying to repair the traditional fabric destroyed.
As the result the only relative advantage of Żelazna Brama, i.e. lots of space and green areas and good social infrastructure will be probably lost, as it is happening right know.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Urbanista1 View Post
Did you coin this phrase? Not sure what it is, is it a form of architecture or planning.
Urbanistyka łanowa (term is in widespread usage for at least 5 years, appeared at least 10 years too late) is not a form or planning. It's the form of lack of planning.

The ex-agricultural plot of land (Mazowsze standard: 7 metres wide, lenght up to the line of horizon) is being bought by the developer, who attempts to cramp the 11-storey buildings in the plot (which is obvious pain in the ***), encircles it with gate and tries to sell it as the "apartamenty". And succeeds, of course, cause the price is 4k PLN for sq m, young professionals coming to Warsaw from some shitholes around can barely afford mortgage rates for a flat worth 250-300k. Not everyone can afford Miasteczko Wilanˇw.

The next developer buys the next plot of land (9 metres wide, lenght up to the horizon)...

And that's how the whole Białołęka looks like. And some people call it "the city". And our "architectural critics" don't see any problem, as they are mostly concerned if absurd rules of Gospel of Saint Corbusier are kept. If building doesn't have steep roof (which is apparently crime against humanity) and if it doesn't have any historicist elements (which is worse than Holocaust+Armageddon+Death Star) - everything is OK according to them.

This is pathology that exists nowhere in Europe. As I say, gated communities (but of much higher standards and actually designed with some help of urban planners) in such scale are in Johannesburg, SA. With that small exception that Joburg actually has a city centre. Not particularly splendid, but it exists.

And actually the only area built according to masterplan in Warsaw in the last 25 years, Miasteczko Wilanˇw, is the main mocking object for our journalists and equally moronic "architecture critics"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Urbanista1 View Post
hideous buildings exist everywhere, is this is uniquely Polish variant?
Lack of city-building skills combined with boom in construction (maybe not now, but few years ago Poland was probably the largest construction site in Europe) is uniquely Polish variant; and if not Polish, it applies at least to Warsaw and Eastern Poland. If you can't create streets, squares, rows of buildings, dominants and axes, if you just scatter the buildings around the city just the way horses take a dump - how can you expect to soften hideous buildings with good urbanism?

For example: every bad piece of architecture (well, no more than 30 m to the roof) can be soften by rows of trees. But the are hardly any new rows of trees in Warsaw(!) The last organized action of planting trees was during Korean War And most of these trees were poplars, the least appropriate ones.
__________________
We shape our buildings; thereafter they shape us. Winston Churchill
Z archiwum Mruczka:
Buk Miłosław Szamotuły
Barcelona Budapeszt Grodno Kowno Madryt Moskwa Ukraina

Alatar, Titan Man, Vaner liked this post
Mruczek no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 14th, 2016, 03:06 AM   #2473
rychlik
BANNED
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 6,809
Likes (Received): 6603

__________________

Urbanista1, catcha, erbse, UnHavrais, moionet and 1 others liked this post
rychlik no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 14th, 2016, 11:51 AM   #2474
jose valderama
Korona Knurˇw
 
jose valderama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: nieopodal bitwy pod Zawichostem
Posts: 40
Likes (Received): 363

Było. Jest. Będzie. When?
__________________
Made it, Ma! Top of the world!
jose valderama no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 14th, 2016, 12:56 PM   #2475
wojtekbp
słoik podlaski
 
wojtekbp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: to tu to tam
Posts: 1,799
Likes (Received): 2174

Great BBC programme about the Warsaw's reconstruction to present:

Quote:
Resurrecting History: Warsaw

Warsaw is a city of great beauty and charm. But it is a city that has come back from the grave. Warsaw’s resurrection is a story of great heroism and extraordinary willpower. It is a story that means a lot to me because, as a child, I lived in the city with my family in the 1950s. What I saw then, and what I felt, has lived with me. In many ways, it has defined my life.

During the Second World War, Warsaw was virtually wiped off the map. It was damaged during the Nazi invasion of 1939, but far worse was to come five years later when nearly 90 per cent of the city was razed to the ground following the courageous yet ill-starred Uprising. Chillingly, the Nazis had planned, even before the war, to destroy Warsaw as the symbol of Polish pride and identity. The destruction was a cultural and human crime. No fewer than 200,000 Poles died in the August 1944 uprising. Many more had been murdered by the Nazis during the uprising in the Jewish Ghetto the year before.

The question facing Poles in early 1945, as they came under the political control of the Soviet Union, was whether to rebuild their lost capital and, if so, how. The Polish people decided that the loss of their great city was intolerable. A great and palpable wrong had to be put right.

At a grass-roots level, soon after the end of the war, the rebuilding started. The great cultural jewels of Warsaw – notably the Market Square, the Barbican, churches, and the grand houses along Nowy Swiat - were rebuilt in a remarkably accurate, authentic but also creative manner.

I arrived in Warsaw just as this first major phase of construction was complete and people were moving into the re-born Old City. It became my home for several years and, although young, I remember being impressed and delighted. I observed the architecture and drew it. I have my drawings still.

Because the rebuilding was undertaken with belief, love and commitment, the reconstructed buildings have great power and presence. They are not mere pastiches, fake parodies of a past world. They possess their own identities and authentic spirit. The Poles’ refusal to accept the fate the Nazis attempted to impose upon them offers a most inspiring example. The dead can come back from the grave, great wrongs can be put right, lost buildings can be convincingly recreated – if the motivation is pure, if it possesses a moral purpose.

What I found on my return after 57 years delighted me. The Old Town, almost new when I first experienced it has weathered well and now, with its patinated colour-wash and mellow details, feels extraordinarily authentic.
And the life of the city is beguiling. It is vibrant, rich and cultured. Despite the horror of the Second World War, Warsaw feels, and looks, once again what it was for so long – a great and mesmerising capital city.

Dan Cruickshank
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/arti...history-warsaw

[dailymotion]x3gto06[/dailymotion]
__________________
Polska jest jak obwarzanek - najlepsza po brzegach | Jˇzef Piłsudski

tramwaj, rychlik liked this post
wojtekbp no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 14th, 2016, 08:18 PM   #2476
tramwaj
Nasalis larvatus
 
tramwaj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Warszawa
Posts: 1,327
Likes (Received): 4165

Fantastic documentary! Thanks
tramwaj no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 15th, 2016, 02:27 PM   #2477
cameronpaul
Paris-the city beautiful
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: London
Posts: 932
Likes (Received): 479

Quote:
Originally Posted by Urbanista1 View Post
a few years ago I would have agreed with you, but this summer having spent an entire week traversing the city on foot in every direction, I must confirm that Warsaw does indeed have a coherence of its own, a syntax of forms (historic, historic stripped, prewwII modernist and commie block) that keep repeating. along with its grand parks and boulevards it has an expansive grandeur that sadly is indeed interrupted by gaping holes in the urban fabric that still have not been filled. but now that so much infill has happened and so many corners rebuilt with nice landmark structures and on top of all that the streetscapes have been largely restored to order and for pedestrian comfort with new light standards and nice even paving throughout, it's a city I would definitely recommend as very exciting. the most glaring examples of that desolate and chaotic emptiness that warsaw was long known for sadly only exists at the east end of the palace of culture or parade square along with smaller pockets here and there especially in Wola, site of the Wola Massacre and more planned Nazi destruction. parks and squares are being cleaned up and revitalized but yes theatre square is still a parking lot, but so many other parks like krasinski are stunning now and even Uprising Square(plac Napoleona) has been cleaned up

generally the centre of the city s the worst because that was the site of the Nazis planned destruction. but you should check out the districts of Mokotow and Ochota which have some beautiful neighbourhoods. and there are so many streets that radiate off Constitution Square that are filled with mostly magnificent pre-war townhouses, but yes, more than half need some maintenance.

I truly don't understand the problem some people have with the old town. I understand if it's Polish people, they are very negative by nature, but the old town is very beautiful an very well maintained, that is, now it is. if either of you visit in the near future be sure to check out the Museum of Warsaw History housed in old townhouses, all original, will open by end of year.
I tend to agree with you. I was last in Warsaw nearly 10 years ago (my only visit so far) and to be honest though I found the city extremely fractured I was also amazed at just how much had either been restored or actually survived considering it was one of the most devastated cities in Europe during WW2. The "Old Town" has mellowed to such an extent you could believe much of it was original. The fact that it is a mecca for tourists is not the fault of the reconstruction, it's proof if anything, of how most people relate to traditional cityscapes as opposed to bland faceless modern efforts. The worst part and most depressing for me was the famous Marshall Street, one of Europe's great streets pre WW2 which was not unfortunately rebuilt and now looks dated and a place you want to get out of rather than enjoy. Lazienki has to be my favourite urban park anywhere, it's pure magic! Look forward to returning one day to see the further restoration projects.
__________________

erbse, Urbanista1 liked this post
cameronpaul no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 15th, 2016, 06:03 PM   #2478
tramwaj
Nasalis larvatus
 
tramwaj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Warszawa
Posts: 1,327
Likes (Received): 4165

Warsaw 10 years ago looked very different. Visit this city again has changed beyond recognition
__________________

cameronpaul, Urbanista1 liked this post
tramwaj no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 16th, 2016, 04:53 AM   #2479
FreeeSpirit
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 94
Likes (Received): 109

Quote:
Originally Posted by Titan Man View Post
Warsaw is the messiest European capital. Some find it charming, but I don't. As a perfectionist (with OCD, probably ), I can't stand a commieblock next to a historicist building stripped of its details next to a 90s fugly architecture. It's just too disturbing for me. Warsaw (and the rest of Central Europe, in fact) needs a "reurbanization plan" which would, in long term, finally make Warsaw a well-planned, organised city. There have to be rules saying what can be built and where it can be built, the construction methods and materials should be coordinated with those in Western Europe, where architecture is of a much better quality. God knows how many post-communist montrosities our countries have seen specifically because of the ignorance of our architects failing to adapt from cheap communist architecture to enjoyable architecture of the 21st century, only in the last few years we've seen some progress regarding that problem. Warsaw is known for its incoherence, wildness and spontaneity, but I think it's time for the city to evolve into something better and bigger, which would be more suitable and enjoyable to its citizens and their visitors.
Warsaw is not 'messy'? It is Eclectic. Variety is the spice of life – and is interesting.

A successful city has to be for ALL people. Warsaw is a city for ALL people - not just for the OCD perfectionists. A city is made of people first - buildings second. Warsaw has something for all tastes and expectations and is realistic. It is far from perfect but most cities are not perfect. Warsaw is a genuine city which is developing organically - and not planned by a few people. The old town, Kings way, Praga, southern Warsaw/Mokotow/old Ochota for the traditional old pre-war streets, Central and Wola district for the modern business/skyscraper scene, Muranow, Ursus areas for those who want to get away from the damp, dark cramped old buildings and prefer modern living with space, sunlight, air, some of the best parks in Europe, cycle paths, a beach in summer, skiing in winter and Warsaw has just only started to rebuild. The commi-blocks, although unwanted, provide an opportunity for low income people to live in the centre. Places like Krakow. Prague, Paris, although pretty are living museums and not so practical. They have narrow streets, congestion and are limited to development and will not change much. Looking pretty is not the only requirement for a successful city.

The only way to develop Warsaw the way you would like is to flatten the city again and start from zero – but that is not going to happen. The pre-war buildings are being preserved and renovated. The commi blocks will not go soon because people are living in them. The new buildings are being built in the remaining gaps. This is the way Warsaw is developing. So again your post is pointless and ignorant of Warsaw’s situation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Titan Man View Post
Maybe I've been, but I fail to see how that's your business.
It is my business because you are talking about my city.

Yes you have the right to post whatever you like – and I have the right to challenge what you have posted – without being called a troll - because this is a 2 way discussion, and not a stupid fight as you say. If you can't answer the questions - don't post the comments.

I asked you a basic polite question – you have no answer - so you call me a troll. You obviously do not have anything ‘legitimate’ to say.

Your post has not contributed anything new and is quite frankly a pointless statement. It has no historical context, it's generelising, you have not said how you came to your conclusion (qualify/any ref/source)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Titan Man View Post
Who said it was my final opinion!? As I said, Warsaw is finally starting to grow, construction sites are everywhere in the city, of course the city is becoming more beautiful as we speak.
You did not say that. Your opinion was clearly final because for some reason you assume that the planners of Warsaw do not have a plan for future development and Warsaw residents and visitors do not enjoy the current Warsaw. Remember we are not all OCD perfectionists.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Titan Man View Post
Also, have I said that I condemn Warsaw's characteristics!?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Titan Man View Post
I can't stand a commieblock next to a historicist building stripped of its details next to a 90s fugly architecture. It's just too disturbing for me. Warsaw (and the rest of Central Europe, in fact) needs a "reurbanization plan" which would, in long term, finally make Warsaw a well-planned, organised city.
Pretty much - yes.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Titan Man View Post
does that automatically mean I love boring and dull cities!? If that's true, Krakow, Prague, Paris and Venice are sooooo boring and dull.
Of all the places I visit - the above are visited the least - because I've been once and that's enough. There is nothing new to see. Same old, same old.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Titan Man View Post
H ave I mentioned Rome in my post!? I don't think Warsaw is comparable to Rome,
It was a figure of speech. "Rome was not built in a day". I was not comparing Warsaw to Rome. You misunderstood.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Titan Man View Post
P.S. I didn't write this, it was some other forumer, but I don't think you care much about that, do you?
Yes we all know - but the point applies to you. Considering 70 years ago Warsaw did not exist - and was rebuilt in 50 years by communist dictators - what do you expect?

Last edited by FreeeSpirit; February 16th, 2016 at 07:20 AM.
FreeeSpirit no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 16th, 2016, 06:53 AM   #2480
Urbanista1
Here and Now
 
Urbanista1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,426
Likes (Received): 5287

Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeeSpirit View Post
Looking pretty is not the only requirement for a successful city.
wholeheartedly agree with this. Warsaw has many faces, like a Cubist sculpture, it has a unique multi-faceted beauty, fascinating and surprisingly different at every turn. Like Rome it has many historic layers (not comparing them) and it was ransacked, like London it's edgy, dynamic and modern, like Moscow it has intimidating grand socialist realist edifices and squares, like Prague it's beautiful and picturesque, like Paris it has some of the most stunning urban parks in the world and finally Warsaw was the only city that was razed to allow Le Corbusier's Ville Radieuse to be actually grafted onto it (skyscrapers and highways). And now it's being filled in with weirdly contorted structures that try to reconcile the spatial and built form conflicts, to re-introduce harmony while maintaining privacy and light to people who live in nearby commieblocks, a tall order that doesn't always succeed.

It's the reconciliation of all these contradictions that makes Warsaw the unique city it is. No other place looks like this. Warsaw is like 3-D synthetic cubism, mixing and matching physical and phenominal forms. I think someone should write a philosophy paper on whether Warsaw is beautiful.

Maybe this is why Picasso fell in love with Warsaw and it inspired him to sketch the famous dove (a gift to Warsaw), which became the symbol of world peace initiatives.



plaque where Picasso stayed in Warsaw

__________________
ten rząd wstrząsa podstawami naszej państwowości i funkcjonowania społeczeństwa. Natomiast większość społeczeństwa śpi, nie zwraca uwagi, co się dzieje i trzeba je z tego snu obudzić - Piotr S


Warsaw Post-War Reconstruction to Present

Last edited by Urbanista1; February 16th, 2016 at 07:57 AM.
Urbanista1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
warsaw, warszawa

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 04:20 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium