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Old June 24th, 2009, 12:20 PM   #381
Alvar Lavague
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Aviationweek.com, June 5, 2009 :
Quote:
Alitalia Recovering But Fears Competition

By Andy Nativi

Alitalia is slowly recovering in terms of load factors and punctuality – 80% of flights on time in May – but is facing two new potential enemies – high-velocity trains and new competition at Milan Linate city airport.

High-velocity trains linking Milan to Rome, considered the airline’s “golden route,” are attracting a wealth of business travelers, which is forcing the airline to improve the service to “premium” level and to lower fares. Also, both the Italian and European antitrust authorities are pressuring Italy to increase operations at Milan Linate by adding new slots that could be assigned to Alitalia competitors.

Domestic carrier Air Italy wants to enter the market, and Lufthansa has tried repeatedly to acquire Linate slots to operate Italian domestic routes. The list of other interested players includes British Airways, Meridiana-Eurofly, Wind Jet and easyJet. Giuseppe Catricalà, head of Italy’s antitrust authority, has proposed to boost Linate slots by 40% from 18 movements per hour to at least 25 and possibly 32.

Alitalia now has 80% of the Linate slots. The antitrust move has been criticized by Enac, the Italian Civil Aviation Authority, which has defended the low traffic volumes at Linate on the basis of environmental and noise issues, as well as safety. But many operators have said the Italian government’s decision to put heavy constraints on Linate is only intended to protect the other Milan airport, Malpensa, since everybody would prefer to operate from Malpensa, if given a choice.

Nevertheless, many international companies are willing to operate from Malpensa on long-range routes, and Italian Foreign Affairs Minister Franco Frattini said 39 countries are discussing new bilateral traffic agreements. Alitalia has instead decided to cut down operations at Malpensa, having declared Rome Fiumicino as its hub, and will concentrate, alongside Air-France-KLM and the other SkyTeam airlines, all its flights in Fiumicino Terminal A. This would happen by 2012. European antitrust authorities are also investigating the slot allocation situation at Fiumicino.

For the time being, this is a preliminary assessment, if the answer obtained will not convince European Union Competition Commissioner Neelie Kroes, a formal inquiry could start, even if the European Parliament has approved a temporary exception to the rule, which calls for the airlines to free slots that have been not actively used during the previous season. The exception has been based on general drop of passenger volumes.
http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/gener...%20Competition
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Old July 4th, 2009, 11:11 AM   #382
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Italy's Insolvency Solution
From Parmalat to Alitalia, Italian bankruptcy laws have undergone a radical change, and now they're being tested in full.
By Richard Lloyd
1 July 2009
American Lawyer
Volume 31; Issue 7

ITALIAN LAWYERS like to insist that the rescue late last year of national airline Alitalia was a one-time-only affair. Certainly, the mix of politics and a high-profile, struggling business—restructured in the full glare of the media—made Alitalia's eventual rescue unique. What wasn't unusual was that Italy was again forced to rework its bankruptcy laws to help an iconic Italian business.

At least this time less adjustment was needed. The first big reworking of Italy's insolvency laws came after massive accounting fraud was unearthed at food conglomerate Parmalat Finanziara S.p.A. in 2003. The previous insolvency regime was more than 60 years old and recognized by most as badly outdated. "Traditionally, the bankruptcy law was tailored to liquidating companies rather than restructuring them," says Fabio Guastadisegni, a bankruptcy partner with Clifford Chance in Milan.

After the Parmalat fraud came to light, the Marzano law—named after former Italian minister of industry Antonio Marzano—was adopted by the Italian government to enable large companies to keep operating after they have filed for bankruptcy. A series of amendments to the country's bankruptcy law between 2005 and 2007 also radically overhauled the restructuring process. Distressed companies and their advisers now have a series of options before and during bankruptcy that are designed to help companies avoid liquidation. Insolvency in Italy is looking more American—albeit with some important differences that have as much to do with Italy's economy as with its legal system.

In another U.S. parallel, a growing coterie of bankruptcy advisers has emerged in the Italian market. Italian firms like Chiomenti and Bonelli Erede Pappalardo have taken high-profile roles on the leading insolvencies such as Alitalia. Local rival Gianni, Origoni, Grippo & Partners strengthened its team in May by hiring Lovells's former corporate recovery head. At the international firms, Bruno Cova, the former legal adviser to the bankruptcy commissioner of Parmalat, now heads a team at Paul, Hastings, Janofsky & Walker's Milan office, while Clifford Chance and Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton also have prominent practices. As the economic crisis continues, there's a steady stream of restructuring and bankruptcy mandates to keep them busy.

In the pre-Marzano era, an insolvency procedure could last up to anywhere between ten and 15 years, says Shearman & Sterling s Michael Bosco, a partner in the firm's Rome office, and often there would be nothing left for creditors once the advisers had taken their fees. Plus, crucially, new funding to a distressed company was not protected. To those who worked under the previous insolvency laws, the new regime reflects considerable progress. "Generally speaking, the new laws work, and they're a great improvement," Paul, Hastings's Cova says.

Cova points to Parmalat's fall from grace—the food conglomerate was found with a €14 billion hole in its accounts—as the turning point in what he calls "a change in attitude to insolvencies." Instead of slipping into liquidation, the company—advised by Italian independent firm Gianni, among others—was restructured. Under the Marzano law, the government appointed a commissioner, Enrico Bondi, to draw up a restructuring plan to allow the company to keep operating. The company gained time to reach a deal with its creditors, who agreed to a debt-for-equity swap, and it emerged from bankruptcy within two years, albeit as a smaller business.

Although the Marzano law was developed specifically in light of Parmalat's collapse, it has had broad implications for the wider market, giving companies and their advisers a route to restructure a business in distress. The overall dynamic in Italy's restructuring market has shifted to one in which creditors have more power and the role of the Italian courts has been reduced. And Italian businesses now have a much more sophisticated range of options to restructure businesses and avoid bankruptcy altogether. Last year Kartogroup S.p.A., a company headquartered in Tuscany that manufactures toilet rolls and paper towels, was restructured under a process known as concordato preventivo. The process, enacted in 2006, is designed to help a company stave off bankruptcy proceedings by reaching agreement with the majority of its creditors. A company's financial position must also be assessed by an independent specialist before the application for concordato preventivo. In the case of Kartogroup, the company, which was advised by Lombardi Molinarie Associati, was ultimately sold to German company WEPA Papier fabrik in a deal announced in August 2008.

Since Parmalat, there has been a steady stream of restructurings under the new laws, Cova says. The past year has seen an acceleration in the number of new cases as the economy has worsened. Boat manufacturer Ferretti S.p.A., for example, defaulted on its debt in January. In April the company, advised by Italian firm Chiomenti, agreed to a € 1.2 billion debt restructuring with its banks, who were advised by Clifford Chance. The company's senior management, backed by a group of Italian banks, took control after former private equity owners Candover Investments and Permira Advisers pulled out.

"The restructuring [of Ferretti] succeeded, but it was not a foregone conclusion," Cova says. Although under the previous laws the company might still have been able to reach an agreement with its banks, Ferretti's restructuring was done under the amended article 67, a part of the bankruptcy regime that gives creditors greater protection from seeing their debt repayments clawed back should the company enter bankruptcy.

Despite the improvements to the restructuring and bankruptcy regimes, some lawyers say the process remains far from simple. "Recent reforms are strongly positive, but [the bankruptcy process has] moved from a position that was catastrophic to one that's difficult," Shearman's Bosco says. In Italy, the cost of the bankruptcy process accounts for 22 percent of an estate, compared with 8 percent overall in countries belonging to the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development, according to statistics from The World Bank. Creditors in Italy recover just 56.6 percent of debt, compared with an OECD average of 68.6 percent.

Bosco points to characteristics in Italy's economy that create a different restructuring dynamic from that of the United States. "In the U.S. there's a corporate bond market, there's a wide range of shareholders, things are tightly regulated and transparent," he says. In Italy only the very largest companies have publicly traded bonds. As a result, smaller companies are more dependent on bank debt, giving Italy's financial institutions an even more important restructuring role than their U.S. counterparts. Fortunately for insolvent Italian businesses, the banks have not shown much interest in pulling the plug. "The banking system is more interested in supporting companies than seeing them brought down," asserts Giuseppe De Palma, a finance partner at Clifford Chance.

Where companies can't avoid bankruptcy, they face obstacles like the lack of an Italian equivalent of debtor-in-possession (DIP) financing. In extraordinary circumstances, insolvent companies may be able to raise money—Parmalat received just over € 100 million from a group of Italian banks soon after it filed for bankruptcy—but generally, the absence of DIP financing places a greater urgency on the bankruptcy process. Lawyers also complain that the Italian courts can be overworked and inefficient, particularly away from the main cities like Milan, Turin, and Rome. Italy lacks specialist bankruptcy courts like those in the United States.

The changes in the law—and more recently, the worsening economy—have prompted international and Italian firms to strengthen their restructuring teams. Among the most prominent practitioners are Cova at Paul, Hastings; Bonelli Erede Pappalardo, one of Italy's market leaders; and boutique Lombardi Molinari. Rivals also point to the teams at Cleary and Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe as having strong track records.

Other firms are starting essentially from scratch. "This is a completely new area," says Giandomenico Ciaramella, a restructuring specialist at Legance. "A few years ago, you could visit the largest Italian firms' Web sites, and you wouldn't find a restructuring area." Now, he points out, Legance has 15 lawyers in its restructuring group, drawing attorneys in from the firm's other practices such as corporate and finance. Clifford Chance only established a stand-alone restructuring group in Italy around two years ago, but it already has approximately 25 lawyers. Some firms have looked to laterals: Gianni hired Silvio Tersilla, the former Italian restructuring head at Lovells, in May. Gianni restructuring head Gabriella Covino calls Tersilla "a cross between a corporate and insolvency specialist," in a description that could apply to many of Italy's restructuring lawyers.

"Previously, you were either corporate or insolvency," she adds. "Now the restructuring process requires a more complex attitude." One that's a little more American, perhaps.
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Old July 22nd, 2009, 04:55 PM   #383
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Recovery Risks; Slot changes, high-speed rail could undermine Alitalia’s efforts to rebuild
8 June 2009
Aviation Week & Space Technology

Just as Alitalia is showing signs of recovery, new threats are emerging that could jeopardize the reborn Italian airline’s future.

A high-speed rail connection could take away some of Alitalia’s lucrative Milan-Rome business, while European regulators are pushing the Italian government to allow more flights at Milan Linate Airport, potentially strengthening rival Air Italy as well as Lufthansa’s Italian operations. British Airways and others are also keen on more slots there. Alitalia currently controls 80% of Linate’s slots.

Antonio Catricala, president of the Italian antitrust authority, suggests increasing Linate slots by as much as 40%. The airport is limited to 18 movements per hour, which would be raised to 25 or even a maximum allowable 32 movements per hour, which a European Union study indicates is possible.

The lower threshold now in place came into effect in 2001 in large part to drive traffic to Milan’s more remote Malpensa Airport, which the government wanted to make the city’s primary airfield. But now, after the merger of Alitalia and Air One, there should be more competition at Linate to exploit its full potential, Catricala said after convening with European Union officials.

The Italian civil aviation authority, Enac, opposes the slot increases, citing concerns about noise and air pollution as well as safety.

Operators, though, have long complained about what they consider artificial constraints placed on Linate, which would be the preferred airport for most.

The move could also impact Malpensa, although Italy’s foreign minister, Franco Frattini, says 39 countries are discussing new bilateral traffic agreements that could bring more long-haul operations there.

Alitalia is cutting back at Malpensa, having shifted to a single-hub operation at Rome’s Fiumicino Airport. Along with minority shareholders Air France-KLM and other SkyTeam airlines, Alitalia is concentrating operations at Fiumicino’s Terminal A, and should complete the process by 2012.

Slots at Fiumicino are also under regulatory scrutiny, although Neelie Kroes, the European Commission’s competition commissioner, has not initiated a formal inquiry.

Meanwhile, Alitalia is still putting its operations in order after the merger last year with Air One, done to help Alitalia avoid insolvency. During the merger process, Alitalia shed many of its debt-laden assets.

The transition period was difficult. In January and February, load factors fell as low as 43% while the airline suffered extensive service disruptions. But operations are stabilizing, and some flights are now full. Alitalia Chief Executive Rocco Sabelli says the goal is to reach a load factor of 67% after May; the carrier considers a 64-65% load factor to be the breakeven level. Still, Sabelli says Alitalia will not get out of the red before 2011.

Pilot training is emerging as the pacing item as the new version of Alitalia overhauls its operations through the fleet reorganization.

The airline is introducing Airbus A320s and simultaneously retiring Boeing MD-80s as the centerpiece of the fleet rationalization effort aimed at reducing the number of aircraft types in service. Maintenance and support costs should come down as a result. But it will not happen quickly since it will take time to qualify pilots on the new types. So far this year, Alitalia has received five A320s originally ordered by Air One.

The medium-haul fleet is still made up of former Air One and Alitalia aircraft in their original liveries. Their mix is complicated by the fact that just as the merger was taking place, Air One was converting from Boeing 737s to A320s. Nevertheless, the majority of former Air One 737s are newer and cheaper to operate than the Alitalia MD-80s.

The merged airline’s long-range fleet plan is based on Boeing types, with 10 777-200ERs and six older 767-300ERs from Alitalia and two A330-200s still in Air One livery. Gradually, Alitalia is expected to operate more A330s. It is also buying the new Airbus twin-widebody A350.

At the end of May, Alitalia’s fleet consisted of 153 aircraft.

The regional aircraft fleet is mixed, as well, although the carrier will focus on regional jets and not use Alitalia’s legacy ATR turboprops. The RJ fleet is composed of six Embraer 170LRs (Alitalia), 10 Bombardier CRJ900s (Air One) and a single Avro RJ70 (Air One).

Ten new aircraft are planned to enter service by the end of the year as older models are phased out.

Sabelli says that by 2013, the Alitalia fleet will stand at 157 aircraft worth €4.2 billion ($5.9 billion), compared to a value of €3.3 billion this year.

Beyond the aircraft to be introduced this year, Alitalia plans to grow its fleet by eight aircraft in 2010, 25 in 2011, 24 in 2012, and five in 2013. That will give it a medium-haul fleet of 90 A320s, and 14 A330s for long-haul operations.
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Old July 31st, 2009, 09:38 PM   #384
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Alitalia reports loss but sees progress
29 July 2009
Agence France Presse

Alitalia on Wednesday posted higher than expected operating losses of 273 million euros (382 million dollars) for the first half of 2009, but said the trend showed sharp improvement.

The Italian airline, taken over by domestic business leaders, merged with domestic rival Air One and put into an alliance with Air France-KLM, which has a 25 percent stake, said the losses were 6.0 percent over budget.

The streamlined company, which came into being on January 13, nevertheless said losses had fallen markedly from the incomplete first quarter to the second -- from 210 million euros to 63 million.

After shedding more than 3,000 jobs to leave it with some 12,000 employees, bosses said turnover to the end of June was 1.28 billion euros.

Alitalia flew 10 million passengers during that period in what amounted to 59 percent seat occupancy, which it said was "broadly in line with expectations."
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Old December 11th, 2009, 06:28 PM   #385
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Alitalia auctions off paintings to pay creditors
10 December 2009

ROME (AP) - Nearly 200 paintings and drawings by contemporary Italian artists have been auctioned off to help pay creditors of troubled Alitalia airline.

The Finarte auction house said Thursday the sale fetched euro1.2 million ($1.77 million).

The paintings were among the troubled Alitalia assets taken over by a bankruptcy administrator, who has been selling them off to pay some of the old Alitalia's creditors. The new Alitalia was formed last January by a group of Italian investors who merged it with the smaller Air One.

Georgia Bava of Finarte said the pieces were originally displayed on aircraft "to let the world know about Italian art." Most recently they were in storage.

An abstract painting by Lucio Fontana fetched the highest price, euro48,000.
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Old December 12th, 2009, 06:53 AM   #386
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777 in new AZ c/s at FCO





http://www.airliners.net/aviation-fo....main/4629364/
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Old January 19th, 2010, 06:00 PM   #387
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New Alitalia celebrates 1st birthday

New Alitalia celebrates 1st birthday; 21 million passengers in 2009 across 73 destinations

This week saw the first anniversary of the launch last January of the ‘new Alitalia’, the airline created by private investors out of bits of the old Alitalia, Air One and Volareweb. According to statistics provided by AEA, between 13 January 2009 and the end of November the new airline carried just over 19.6 million passengers at an average load factor of 65.4%. The load factor figure compares poorly with major legacy carrier rivals such as Air France (78.8%), British Airways (78.2%), Iberia (79.9%), KLM (81.4%), Lufthansa (77.9%) and even SAS (71.7%).



For 2009 as a whole it looks likely that the airline will have carried around 21 million passengers using a fleet of almost 150 aircraft across a network comprising of some 73 airports. The fleet currently consists of two A330s, 10 777s and six 767s for long-haul flights, over 80 A320 series aircraft, a dozen 737s (from Air One), and almost 20 MD-82s which are being rapidly phased out. In addition there is a ‘regional’ fleet comprising 10 CRJ-900s (from Air One CityLiner) and six Embraer E170s (from Alitalia Express). In future, the airline plans to operate additional A320s (to replace the MD-82s), A330s (replacing the 767s) and even A350s (though these are not expected to enter service before 2014).

Four destinations dropped and four added during 2009
According to OAG data, since re-launching last January Alitalia has axed services to four European destinations while adding services to four others. The axed airports were Dűsseldorf (from 30 June), Krakow, Prague (from 28 March) and Timisoara while the new additions to the network were Berlin (Tegel), Crotone, Thessaloniki and Valencia. The airline’s global network as operated this month remains at 73 destinations (of which 51 are in Europe) although new routes from Rome starting this summer will see the addition of Los Angeles, Malaga and Vienna to the network. Other possible new destinations from Rome this summer include Berlin Tegel, a return to Prague, Seoul Incheon, Shanghai Pu Dong, Rio de Janeiro and Zurich.

That still leaves quite a few major European cities not currently served including Copenhagen, Dublin, Dűsseldorf, Helsinki, Lisbon, Lyon, Manchester, Glasgow, Oslo and Stockholm. A number of other destinations served by the ‘old’ Alitalia are summarised in our previous analysis of the ‘new Alitalia’. Outside of Europe the airline currently serves 22 destinations.

Several new routes from Bologna, Catania and Linate
A year-on-year comparison reveals that Alitalia has cut frequencies at six of its busiest 12 airports while increasing flights at five others (Bari remains unchanged). Double-digit percentage increases have occurred at Bologna, Catania and Milan Linate.



At Bologna the airline has added new daily flights to Catania and Palermo (both in Sicily), while Catania has seen the addition of new services to Genoa and Venice as well as Bologna. From Linate Alitalia has added flights to Bucharest Otopeni, Crotone and Paris Orly, though Athens and Warsaw services were axed last September.

The biggest cutbacks have continued to be felt at Milan Malpensa where weekly flights have been halved from 260 to 130 per week, making the airport just the seventh busiest in the airline’s revamped network.

Few international routes outside of Rome and Milan
Rome Fiumicino is the airline’s dominant international hub but it does offer a range of international services from both Milan airports. This winter saw the launch of all four of the international routes currently available from Turin.

Milan Linate to Amsterdam, Barcelona, Bucharest Otopeni, Brussels, Frankfurt, London City, London Heathrow, Madrid, Paris CDG, Paris Orly.
Milan Malpensa to Algiers, Cairo, Istanbul, Kiev, Moscow Sheremetyevo, New York JFK, Sao Paulo, Sofia, Tel Aviv, Tirana, Tokyo Narita, Tripoli, Tunis
Naples to Athens
Turin to Amsterdam, Berlin Tegel, Istanbul, Moscow Sheremetyevo.
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Old January 20th, 2010, 02:42 AM   #388
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Old January 20th, 2010, 10:39 AM   #389
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Happy Birthday Alitalia
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Old January 21st, 2010, 12:33 AM   #390
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The celebration of a grand scam against Italian citizens and all of its passengers. First its "managers" arrange for it to go bankrupt by squandering millions of euros (in spite of paying ground and travelling personnel Europe's lowest salaries) then, abracadabra! They create a "good" company to revive Alitalia (by selling good assets to private entrepreneurs in "good terms" with the gov't) and a "bad" company (i.e. leaving liabilities to the Italian state, the one that will have to fill the abyss of debt). There is just nothing to celebrate. Or, we could as well celebrate Al Capone's anniversary.
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Old January 21st, 2010, 12:53 AM   #391
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I didn't even knew about "new Alitalia"...
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Old July 5th, 2010, 05:57 PM   #392
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Alitalia CEO: 2Q Strong, No Need For Fresh Capital
5 July 2010

ROME (Dow Jones)--Unlisted carrier CAI Alitalia SpA improved its performance in the first half due to a "very strong" second quarter, Chief Executive Rocco Sabelli said Monday.

"The Italian carrier posted double-digit [percentage] improvements in several key sectors, including transatlantic flights and capacity levels," Sabelli said. "The company had EUR500 million in cash and credit lines as of June 30, and is on course to achieve its industrial plan targets, which doesn't foresee any fresh capital injections," Sabelli added, while agreeing uncertainty remained high.

On Monday CAI Alitalia also announced a joint venture with Air France-KLM (AF.FR) and Delta Air Lines Inc. (DAL). Sabelli said that the joint venture is "fundamental for the definitive revival" of the Italian carrier.

Sabelli said there were "no plans" to merge CAI Alitalia with Air France, which already owns 25% of the carrier. "The joint venture is a way of ramping up operational scale while keeping corporate balance sheets of member companies sustainable," Sabelli said, adding that he hoped more airlines, including smaller ones, would join the venture.

AirFrance-KLM Chairman Pierre-Henri Gourgeon, who was in Rome to sign the joint venture expansion, said the arrangement was "as close as you can get" while remaining separate companies. He also said his company's decision to write down the value of its stake in CAI Alitalia was a result of accounting rules and not as an expression of Air France's valuation of CAI Alitalia.
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Old September 18th, 2010, 10:18 PM   #393
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Alitalia sees recovery continuing in H2

TOKYO, Sept 15 (Reuters) - Italian carrier Alitalia expects passenger traffic to continue recovering in the second half of the year after a 10 percent rise in first-half revenue, thanks to growing travel demand especially in and out of Brazil and Argentina, a senior executive said.

Alitalia, in which Air France-KLM holds a 25 percent stake, may also increase its flight frequency to Osaka, the business hub of western Japan, eyeing greater access in the country as once-high-flying Japan Airlines slashes routes as part of its massive restructuring.

"When there's a market opportunity, go after it. You can't wait, you have to react very fast because the market changes very quickly," Giorgio Callegari, executive vice president for alliances and strategies at Alitalia, told Reuters in an interview.

"When JAL announced reduction of their services we decided we would revisit our network strategy and readjust our long-houl network to see if we could come up with more capacity to dedicate to Japan. We have been successful in doing that," he said.

JAL, after filing for bankruptcy in January with $25 billion in debt, is set to terminate both its Milan and Rome services by early next month. The Japanese carrier also plans to abandon one in eight overseas flights and end a quarter of its home routes in a bid to return to profit. [ID:nTOE67U06X]

Tapping into a market opportunity created by JAL's withdrawal, the loss-making Italian carrier is set to increase its service to Tokyo's Narita airport to 14 flights a week by early next month, up 40 percent from six months ago.

Alitalia went bankrupt in 2008 after years of struggling with strikes and inefficiencies and was relaunched as a private airline by Italian investors last year. It had a difficult rebirth, grappling with low occupancy rates and flight delays that prompted a barrage of complaints.

But the airline's performance in the first half of the year showed a strong improvement from a year earlier, with revenues rising 10 percent. [ID:nLDE6641AL]

Callegari, speaking at Alitalia's Tokyo office, said the company is on track to break even in 2011 as planned under its restructuring.

"In July, August and part of September what we've seen are (passenger) volumes that are slightly better than the first six months (of the year) and we're also seeing a good booking trend for the remaining part of the year," he said.

"Our overall forecast for market growth in Italy for 2011 is about 7 to 8 percent. The fact that we grow more than the market is an indication of good performance," said Callegari.
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Old September 19th, 2010, 01:02 AM   #394
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Alitalia sees recovery continuing in H2

TOKYO, Sept 15 (Reuters) - Italian carrier Alitalia expects passenger traffic to continue recovering in the second half of the year after a 10 percent rise in first-half revenue, thanks to growing travel demand especially in and out of Brazil and Argentina, a senior executive said.
Good news!

Almost official AZ new fligth: Rome-Rio/June 11

I hope AZ resume São Paulo-Milan,ended at April/2010.
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Old September 19th, 2010, 08:14 PM   #395
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Good to see Alitalia improving!

It's a great classic airline, that should be kept.

It should increase its long-haul destiantions. Rome has few trancontinental destinations and many non-European airlines only fly there seasonally. Alitalia has to catch the huge tourist flow from emerging markets.
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Old September 19th, 2010, 08:22 PM   #396
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Alitalia: direct flights between Italy and Japan and increase of frequencies from Rome and Milan to Tokyo


Rome, Italy - All routes will be served by a B-777 airplane with 291 seats

Alitalia will be the only carrier, from next October 1st, to offer direct links between Italy and Japan, increasing the connections from Rome and from Milan to Tokyo, bringing the offer to 18 weekly frequencies between two Countries.

The frequencies per week to rise from 3 to 4, as of next October 7, from Milan, with a flight that will take off at 12:25pm from Malpensa and will arrive at 5:55pm (local hour) of the following day. From 9 to 10 will be those ones from Rome, starting from November 2, with a new service at 9:20am and arrival at 2:05pm (local hour) of the following day. Alitalia to continue to operate also the links from Rome to Osaka, with four frequencies per week.

The increase of the flights between Italy and Japan meets the strong request of the touristic traffic and business one. The passengers who arrive in Rome or in Milan by Alitalia could continue towards all other destinations in Italy and Europe served by carrier's network.

All routes will be operated, from next October 1st, by Boeing 777 airplane with 291 seats on board.

Alitalia continues to reinforce its own network, to renew its fleet and to invest about services' quality. In August the flights regularity has been about 99,9% and the punctuality 80%. The passengers have increased 12% and the revenue 17% (compared to the same month in 2009). The customer satisfaction has risen at 80%, +10% compared to the last year.

http://www.avionews.com/index.php?co...ante=index.php
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Old September 20th, 2010, 05:16 AM   #397
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good news for my country's national carrier
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Old September 23rd, 2010, 04:35 AM   #398
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Old September 23rd, 2010, 05:56 AM   #399
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BEAUTIFUL B777 IN BUENOS AIRES EZE

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Old September 24th, 2010, 04:53 PM   #400
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Alitalia resumes Rome – Rio de Janeiro from June 2011
20100924 by jimyvr Leave a Comment

Alitalia from 04JUN11 resumes Rome – Rio de Janeiro service. Service operates with brand new Airbus A330-200 aircraft, initially with 3 weekly, then increasing to 4 weekly from 28JUN11.

Schedule below:

AZ672 FCO2230 – 0540+1GIG 330 x134
AZ673 GIG1445 – 0710+1FCO 330 x245

04JUN11 – 26JUN11 FCO departure Day 267, GIG departure Day 137

http://airlineroute.net/2010/09/24/az-fcogig-s11/
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