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Old April 10th, 2011, 12:07 AM   #121
mike7743
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Originally Posted by vanbasten88 View Post
For a well traveled and well educated man, he obviously didn't bother to travel to his basic manners class at his preposterously expensive private school. Insulting an entire country of 300 million based on the inane questions of one or two individuals, not to mention belittling sports(even in jest) loved by many millions isn't just bad manners its pure arrogance and embarrassing for me as an Aussie to be honest. Different doesn't have to mean wrong, it is supposed to be one of the first things you learn if you bother to travel.

Cheers, mate!





football IS America. it's engraved in the country's identity and it is it's favorite sport. its just completely arrogant to not respect a country's culture and customs, if you're a reasonable person.

just how BIG is football in America....well the following article sums up the impact the impending NFL lockout will have on the economy/industry.


Quote:
Six industries hurt by an NFL lockout

Since 1985, professional football has steadily led the field as the most popular sport in the United States. In fact, the most recent Harris poll shows that it’s earned a double-digit lead over baseball, long considered America’s pastime. So it’s no wonder that companies are sweating over the owner/player dispute that is threatening to cancel the 2011-12 NFL season. Here is a sampling of industries that will be affected by the lockout.

Television

DirecTV could be the big loser if the National Football League cancels the 2011 season. According to a report by Bloomberg News, the largest U.S. satellite-television provider could lose more than $600 million in revenue this year.


DirecTV’s NFL Sunday Ticket, which allows viewers to watch every NFL game, generated between $600 million and $750 million in subscription revenue last season. The football package is not offered by any other satellite-program operator. DirecTV also stands to lose an estimated $100 million in ad sales without NFL games.

But a canceled season would also impact other television and broadcast companies, including CBS’s CBS Network, News Corporation’s Fox, Comcast’s NBC and Walt Disney’s ESPN, all of which broadcast games throughout the season, and would likely see reduced advertising revenue if there are no games to air. ESPN may be especially antsy about a quick settlement; it is reportedly close to a $2 billion renewal for the rights to Monday Night Football beyond 2020, Sports Business Daily reported.

In 2010, 65 of the top 100 watched sporting events in the United States were NFL games, and every TV ad spot for the Super Bowl (which cost as much as $2.8 million for a 30-second-spot last season) was sold out months before the big game.

Video games

Yes, fans are always ready for some football – even the computer-generated version. Electronic Arts, the maker of the popular “Madden” football franchise video games, recently said it is going ahead with its Madden NFL 12 edition, despite the NFL owners and players still squaring off at the negotiations table. But a lockout could result in real-life losses of about $165 million for EA, which analysts say could suffer a 50 percent drop in sales. Madden 12 is due on the shelves in August, just weeks before the NFL season usually kicks off.

Vendors, souvenir merchants, tourism

Games bring fans; fans mean sales, whether it’s foam fingers, cheese heads or bobble-head dolls. Fans also need a place to stay, especially out-of-towners who travel to watch their favorite team on the road. But with the owners and players in a deadlock, many stadium cities could become ghost towns. The Minneapolis Downtown Council estimates a $9 million loss per home game if the Vikings don’t play. Multiply that by eight games, and we’re talking big bucks. (And that’s for a team that went 6-10 last season.)

The trickle-down effect could be even worse. Without customers, stores, hotels, stadium concessions and crews for clean-up and security would not be needed, accounting for countless jobs lost.

Food

An NFL lockout is making the food industry cluck with anxiety. According to the National Chicken Council, football fans consume about 5-10 million pounds of chicken wings during Thursday, Sunday and Monday games in each of the 17 weeks of the NFL season. On Super Bowl Sunday alone, an estimated 450 million wings were consumed.

Beer/beverages

Soft drink companies, including Gatorade (the official dumped-on-the-head-coach beverage), hawk their products in TV ads and on stadium billboards, resulting in multi-billion sales each year, not to mention moneys spent on exclusive rights to associate their brand with the NFL.

A few examples: Pepsi paid $560 million over eight years; Gatorade forks over $45 million a year, plus marketing costs and free supplies for teams. Companies wouldn’t spend those kinds of dollars if the returns weren’t worth it, right?

But beer sales would suffer big time, especially for Anheuser-Busch InBev, which is paying $1.2 billion over six years to make Bud Light the NFL’s official beer sponsor, starting with the 2011 season, according to Advertising Age. One lost season may translate to an awful lot of suds down the drain.

Sporting goods

After inking a deal reportedly worth $1.1 billion to become the NFL’s official outfitter, Nike bigwigs are probably breathing a sigh of relief that the contract doesn’t go into effect until April 2012. Meanwhile, Reebok, the current outfitter, stands to lose a hefty sum if this season is canceled. And those deals only apply to apparel and uniforms worn by the players and coaches.

Americans spent more than $8 billion on sports logo apparel in 2009 (the most recent data) with pro football claiming a big chunk of those sales approximately $2.5 billion. The recession took a bite out of the retail market in 2010 analysts estimate U.S. NFL merchandise sales dropped to $2.1 billion, and there’s no telling what consumers will do if they can’t show off their team colors.

The bottom line

Players and owners are the ones that make the news stories in this NFL mess. But no matter whose side you’re on, the real losers are the businesses that count on those headline grabbers to make their living. There’s a lot more at stake than collective bargaining issues.


http://news.yahoo.com/s/yblog_thetic...te-legislature





and how much Football dominates over everything that is entertainment in America.....


http://www.sportsgrid.com/nfl/the-nf...ion-is-absurd/

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/20/bu...ings.html?_r=4



once a person understands this culture then it's easy to see why we build first class sports facilities for kids.

Last edited by mike7743; April 10th, 2011 at 02:07 AM. Reason: link adress fixed
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Old April 10th, 2011, 02:26 AM   #122
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Not attempting to rile anyone up, but is the painting of soccer (it pains me to say that) lines on the American Football turf widespread in U.S. high school stadiums? I understand the difference in terms of popularity but can these schools really not find a patch of grass suitable instead of forcing both on one? I've played soccer on an American Football turf before and good lord it was confusing.
in most cases it has a lot to do with Soccer's popularity. Soccer doesn't make much money, if any at all. only in recent years Soccer has started to get a little respect (if you even call it that) from Americans. for the most part, unfortunately, Soccer is considered a women sport. building big stadium for a sport that isn't nearly as popular makes no sense from the management point of view. soccer doesn't bring the town's folks to see a game. it's something parents would have their kids do in order to keep them healthy. I played soccer in high school and when I did even though my school had tons of money to throw away building a dedicated soccer stadium was never considered a priority. we had a really nice field but played on a football stadium as well. the lines were erased after each game and painted back when needed. if America falls in love with soccer (maybe in the near future) then the world is going to have a problem. with this much talent pool, innovation and love for sports a serious contender will arrive. fortunately for others, America doesn't like Soccer (relatively speaking). lol
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Old April 10th, 2011, 05:12 AM   #123
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First of all, calling "soccer a woman sport" is quite derogatory and generalised, secondly I wasn't implying that each school would build a specialist, "soccer specific stadium" dedicated to the sport, all I was saying was is it really impossible for schools to put aside one patch of field for the soccer team to play upon. I understand that in more built up areas where each high school hasn't much land it is a necessary evil, and like I mentioned earlier I understand the sport isn't considered a crowd puller, but with the sports burgeoning interest it just seems a bit worst of both worlds to force the team to play on a modified "football" turf.
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Old April 10th, 2011, 05:15 AM   #124
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matthemod View Post
First of all, calling "soccer a woman sport" is quite derogatory and generalised, secondly I wasn't implying that each school would build a specialist, "soccer specific stadium" dedicated to the sport, all I was saying was is it really impossible for schools to put aside one patch of field for the soccer team to play upon. I understand that in more built up areas where each high school hasn't much land it is a necessary evil, and like I mentioned earlier I understand the sport isn't considered a crowd puller, but with the sports burgeoning interest it just seems a bit worst of both worlds to force the team to play on a modified "football" turf.
its not derogatory, its true here. My high school had a girls soccer team but not a boys and they had their own field separate from the football/track stadium
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Old April 10th, 2011, 06:56 AM   #125
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matthemod View Post
First of all, calling "soccer a woman sport" is quite derogatory and generalised, secondly I wasn't implying that each school would build a specialist, "soccer specific stadium" dedicated to the sport, all I was saying was is it really impossible for schools to put aside one patch of field for the soccer team to play upon. I understand that in more built up areas where each high school hasn't much land it is a necessary evil, and like I mentioned earlier I understand the sport isn't considered a crowd puller, but with the sports burgeoning interest it just seems a bit worst of both worlds to force the team to play on a modified "football" turf.
why would it be derogatory? you're talking to an American here. we're experts at political correctness. soccer is considered a "women sport." period. I'm saying that as a person who grew up playing it and watches the Premier League every Sunday. parents would have their kids play it as a means of keeping them occupied or to get them involved in an activity. some take it seriously enough for college scholarships but that's where it ends. (for the most part) Soccer in the US is usually dominated by women. in fact, so much so that the US's Women National soccer team is considered the Brazil of the world's cup. pretty much wining the most cups and is the dominant team in the tournament. maybe that helps you put things in perspective.


Hopefully it'll catch up soon. in fact, it's as popular as it's ever been so there's some hope. when interests pick up then schools would have a reason to build dedicated fields. (I'm sure many schools have soccer fields as of now, just not being paid attention to on the same level as football or basketball)

Last edited by mike7743; April 10th, 2011 at 07:01 AM.
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Old April 10th, 2011, 08:06 AM   #126
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First of all I'm sure there are some americans who consider soccer to be a "womens sport" but I don't think that is the majority of our country.I also don't think that has anything to do with the multipurpose fields. Basically in super urban areas such as NYC land is at a premium so they have multipurpose fields, also many schools that have artificial turf fields use it for the majority of field sports such as football,soccer,lacrosse,field hockey etc.. so they can get the most return for their investment and also to show that they treat each sporting program equally and do not show preferential treatment to one certain program with better facilities. Unfortunately, a jumbled mess of lines is left on the field which is very distracting for any sport in my opinion.In ohio where I grew up I would say 95 percent of the high schools offered mens and womens soccer as a sport and the majority have seperate fields for the teams. The only schools that played on multipurpose fields were schools that had artificial turf. I also think there are many males in the us that would like to play pro soccer someday and that every year soccer keeps getting more and more popular in the US.
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Old April 10th, 2011, 10:22 AM   #127
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Oh God are you all STILL in high school ? I am English so I win (JOKE) I understand why the american high school system works and how hugh football is to small town USA. I may not be a fan of high school football but its not aimed at me. After seeing how big some of the school stadiums are. Sure iam not the only one who is shocked at the size and a little envy of them.

"because ancient Romans, Greeks, Egyptians or the 18th century British were all more powerful and advanced than current USA" Thats a little unfair since all other empires have fallen. Oh yeah has for the usa health care. god thats bad
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Old April 10th, 2011, 04:48 PM   #128
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Oh God are you all STILL in high school ? I am English so I win (JOKE) I understand why the american high school system works and how hugh football is to small town USA. I may not be a fan of high school football but its not aimed at me. After seeing how big some of the school stadiums are. Sure iam not the only one who is shocked at the size and a little envy of them.

if that's directed at me, NO, I'm not in High school. I graduated from college three years ago. I talked about my time playing high school soccer in the past sentence. reading is fundamental my friend.


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"because ancient Romans, Greeks, Egyptians or the 18th century British were all more powerful and advanced than current USA" Thats a little unfair since all other empires have fallen. Oh yeah has for the usa health care. god thats bad
Precisely.


as for our health care, (even though Universal health care has recently passed, if you were paying attention) USA may not have the best health care system but it has some of the BEST hospitals and doctors with some of the most advanced services anywhere on the planet.

check out this list and see how USA dominates.

http://hospitals.webometrics.info/top2000.asp

21 out of the top 25 are all in the US. that's some amazing advancement. take that. lol

now, are you done taking shots at the good ol USA? lol, we can go back to enjoying pictures...
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Old April 10th, 2011, 05:26 PM   #129
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I'm sorry but this thread is spinning in all directions. I just had to respond but let's try to stay on topic please.
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Old April 10th, 2011, 05:33 PM   #130
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Yes thats why I asked IF YOUR ALL STILL IN HIGH SCHOOL. Acting like school kids really don't care whos dad can beat whos dad. but that website looks homemade and very one sided. The USA has the best doctors Dr George House is played by an English guy (JOKE).
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Old April 10th, 2011, 09:25 PM   #131
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I really regret starting this thread... All I wanted to see was some damn pictures of high school stadiums... The American health care system, Romans, Greeks, Egyptians, America vs. the World, Dr. House, etc. I want to know...

WTF DOES ANY OF THIS HAVE TO DO WITH HIGH SCHOOL STADIUMS?
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Old April 10th, 2011, 10:03 PM   #132
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Royse City ISD Stadium, Royse City High School, Royse City, Texas


San Angelo Stadium, San Angelo, Texas


Breakers Stadium, Pacific Grove High School, Pacific Grove, California
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Old April 11th, 2011, 12:37 AM   #133
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Waller I.S.D. Stadium, Waller, TX



And this isn't a stadium, but I felt the need to show Katy's trophy case. (Katy, TX.... former home of Andy Dalton)

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