daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy (aug.2, 2013) | DMCA policy | flipboard magazine

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Asian Forums > Vietnam Forum

Vietnam Forum Xin Cho! Welcome to Vietnam



Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old April 24th, 2011, 08:53 AM   #41
doehomey
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 201
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by vanboy2 View Post
I found this sentence very funny to the point.So people have to fit into the frame whatever their parents already set it up?
It you think about it, it would not be so funny. Not many people take the road not travelled in life. How many people follow their parents in politics, religion, food etc. Vanboy is a deep thinker or maybe not?
doehomey no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
 
Old April 24th, 2011, 09:07 AM   #42
coolink
BANNED
 
coolink's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Bồng Lai
Posts: 37,851
Likes (Received): 2298

oh boy, more of the 19th century Shakespeare in love
coolink no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 24th, 2011, 09:18 AM   #43
doehomey
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 201
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by coolink View Post
oh boy, more of the 19th century Shakespeare in love
We all know you are very bright but Robert Frost is not Shakespeare nor from the same time frame. Besides the Civics class, maybe you should spend more time in your literary class also?
doehomey no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 24th, 2011, 09:22 AM   #44
coolink
BANNED
 
coolink's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Bồng Lai
Posts: 37,851
Likes (Received): 2298

Quote:
Originally Posted by doehomey View Post
We all know you are very bright but Robert Frost is not Shakespeare nor from the same time frame. Besides the Civics class, maybe you should spend more time in your literary class also?
nah, my speaking and typing is way way better than some people here.......and if I take the time to edit stuff........I will also surpass them too..

and until now some of us cannot understand what Shakespeare is referring too

ps. who here has a degree in teaching?............ME
nothing major, but hey I got the certificate........do you?
coolink no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 25th, 2011, 11:05 PM   #45
doehomey
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 201
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by coolink View Post
nah, my speaking and typing is way way better than some people here.......and if I take the time to edit stuff........I will also surpass them too..

and until now some of us cannot understand what Shakespeare is referring too

ps. who here has a degree in teaching?............ME
nothing major, but hey I got the certificate........do you?
Some people need a clock to show that they have a heart. Others need a medal to show that they have courage. Coolink's certificate will denote that Coolink definitely has a brain. Doehomey must bow before Coolink because Doehomey has no certificate. Doehomey does walk around with the bible to show that he has faith. Perhaps Coolink will visit Doehomey in Oz (Australia) one of these days?

Last edited by doehomey; April 25th, 2011 at 11:18 PM.
doehomey no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 25th, 2011, 11:08 PM   #46
doehomey
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 201
Likes (Received): 0

A great poem that all should know (luckily in public domain now):

The Road Not Taken
by Robert Frost

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I
I took the one less travelled by,
And that has made all the difference.

Last edited by doehomey; April 25th, 2011 at 11:28 PM.
doehomey no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 26th, 2011, 01:49 AM   #47
Siddude
Registered User
 
Siddude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Venice, CA
Posts: 933
Likes (Received): 15

I like Robert Frost too especially the allusion about the path not taken. Viet Cong took Vietnam into the sh*tter!!! The path diverged into two roads: one Viet Cong, 3rd world, commie poverty and dictatorship and the other civilization and economic progress!!! LOL I know what road Viet Cong with delusions of grandeur took on their way to a communist paradise. LOL... On this road Cuba, North Korea, etc. are already there to welcome them into paradise!!!

Poor lil ole VC, they try so hard to deny their record and history of under achievement and economic mismanagement but the facts speak for themselves. VC Vietnam's GDP per capita is on par with the lowly, backward ass countries of sub-Saharan Africa. That is leadership for you.
Siddude no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 26th, 2011, 05:18 AM   #48
vttnguyen
Registered User
 
vttnguyen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 725
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by doehomey View Post
A great poem that all should know (luckily in public domain now):

The Road Not Taken
by Robert Frost

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I
I took the one less travelled by,
And that has made all the difference.
So which is it, The road less travelled or The road Not taken?
I'll take the one less travelled.
vttnguyen no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 26th, 2011, 06:14 AM   #49
vttnguyen
Registered User
 
vttnguyen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 725
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by Siddude View Post
I like Robert Frost too especially the allusion about the path not taken. Viet Cong took Vietnam into the sh*tter!!! The path diverged into two roads: one Viet Cong, 3rd world, commie poverty and dictatorship and the other civilization and economic progress!!! LOL I know what road Viet Cong with delusions of grandeur took on their way to a communist paradise. LOL... On this road Cuba, North Korea, etc. are already there to welcome them into paradise!!!

Poor lil ole VC, they try so hard to deny their record and history of under achievement and economic mismanagement but the facts speak for themselves. VC Vietnam's GDP per capita is on par with the lowly, backward ass countries of sub-Saharan Africa. That is leadership for you.
Perhaps, when they're much much older, they'll reminisce about the backward decisions they made. They'll do it with sigh (repentance, wistfulness, regrets). It was just a dream. It was just a dream....
vttnguyen no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 26th, 2011, 11:48 PM   #50
going-higher
Live over the edge
 
going-higher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Saigon baybee
Posts: 3,836
Likes (Received): 64

Anti-nuclear protesters target Vietnam

Quote:
Members of an anti-nuclear group submitted a letter to the Vietnamese embassy in Bangkok yesterday expressing concern about the country's plan to build eight nuclear power plants.

About 15 members of an anti-nuclear group stage a rally in front of the Vietnamese embassy in Bangkok to protest against Vietnams planned construction of nuclear power plants. PATIPAT JANTHONG

The open letter warned of a possible Fukushima-like disaster at the planned plant in Ninh Thuan, located only 800 kilometres from Ubon Ratchathani province.

The petition said Vietnam had huge potential for generating electricity by wind power with a potential annual capacity of 513,360 megawatts.

Chompunoot Morachat, of Ubon Ratchathani Rajabhat University, said the group would also petition Asean, encouraging the bloc to require that its members comply with international laws on compensation for people affected by nuclear power plants.

Thanakhom Rojrangsikul said he and his wife, as descendants of Vietnamese people, were concerned for the safety of future generations should Hanoi build the power plants.

"The incident in Japan is a good wake-up call. Let us not forget this lesson," said 56-year-old Thanakhom, referring to the disaster at the earthquake- and tsunami-hit Fukushima Daiichi nuclear complex.

Sodsai Srangsok, of the Ubon Network against Nuclear, said despite the Thai authorities' announcement that they would delay plans to build nuclear power plants, the network would continue working to educate residents in Ubon Ratchathani about the dangers of the plants.

The northeastern province is one of eight provinces named by the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand as a potential site for a nuclear power plant.
http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/loca...target-vietnam

Tui Thai khong build duoc nuclear power.. no co quyen gi ma can nguoi ta.. ma nguoi cam dau la con chau nguoi Viet nua chu..Kinh mat goc
__________________
VIETNAM
* Saigon Video Clips
going-higher está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old April 27th, 2011, 10:56 AM   #51
xmod
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 141
Likes (Received): 0

Madame Nhu died in Rome at 87

I didn't like her. She was egotistical and self-absorbed. Unfortunately, she set a terrible example for Vietnamese women that lasted decades.

Her quote about comparing self-immolating Buddhists to a barbecue showed how much of a sh**y person she was.

She was Vietnam’s Imelda Marcos, only a little worse and more destructive imo.

Madame Nhu, Vietnam War Lightning Rod, Dies

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/27/wo...pagewanted=all

Quote:
Madame Nhu, who as the glamorous official hostess in South Vietnam’s presidential palace became a politically powerful and often harshly outspoken figure in the early years of the Vietnam War, died on Sunday in Rome, where she had been living. She was believed to be 87.

Her death was confirmed by her sister, Lechi Oggeri.

Born in 1924 — the date is uncertain, though some sources say April 15 — she spent the last four decades in Rome and southern France.

Her parents named her Tran Le Xuan, or “Beautiful Spring.” As the official hostess to the unmarried president of South Vietnam, her brother-in-law, she was formally known as Madame Ngo Dinh Nhu. But to the American journalists, diplomats and soldiers caught up in the intrigues of Saigon in the early 1960s, she was “the Dragon Lady,” a symbol of everything that was wrong with the American effort to save her country from Communism.

In those years, before the United States deepened its military involvement in the war, Madame Nhu thrived in the eye of her country’s gathering storm as the wife of Ngo Dinh Nhu, the younger brother and chief political adviser to Ngo Dinh Diem, the president of South Vietnam from 1955 until 1963.

While her husband controlled the secret police and special forces, Madame Nhu acted as a forceful counterweight to the diffident president, badgering Diem’s aides, allies and critics with unwelcome advice, public threats and subtle manipulations. Then, after both men were killed in a military coup mounted with the tacit support of the United States, she slipped into obscurity.

In her years in the spotlight, when she was in her 30s, she was beautiful, well coiffed and petite. She made the form-fitting ao dai her signature outfit, modifying the national dress with a deep neckline. Whether giving a speech, receiving diplomats or reviewing members of her paramilitary force of 25,000 women, she drew photographers like a magnet. But it was her impolitic penchant for saying exactly what she thought that drew world attention.

When, during Diem’s early days in power, she heard that the head of the army, Gen. Nguyen Van Hinh, was bragging that he would overthrow the president and make her his mistress, she confronted him at a Saigon party. “You are never going to overthrow this government because you don’t have the guts,” Time magazine quoted her as telling the startled general. “And if you do overthrow it, you will never have me because I will claw your throat out first.”

Her “capacity for intrigue was boundless,” William Prochnau wrote in “Once Upon a Distant War: Young War Correspondents and the Early Vietnam Battles” (1995). So was her hatred of the American press.

“Madame Nhu looked and acted like the diabolical femme fatale in the popular comic strip of the day, ‘Terry and the Pirates,’ ” Mr. Prochnau wrote. “Americans gave her the comic-strip character’s name: the Dragon Lady.”

In the pivotal year of 1963, as the war with the North worsened, discontent among the South’s Buddhist majority over official corruption and failed land reform efforts fueled protests that culminated in the public self-immolations of several Buddhist monks. Shocking images of the fiery suicides raised the pressure on Diem, as did Madame Nhu’s well-publicized reaction. She referred to the suicides as “barbecues” and told reporters, “Let them burn and we shall clap our hands.”

Tran Le Xuan was the younger daughter of Nam Tran Chuong, herself the daughter of an imperial Vietnamese princess, and Tran Van Chuong, a patrician lawyer who later became Diem’s ambassador to Washington. As a willful girl, she bullied her younger brother, Khiem Van Tran, and was more devoted to the piano and the ballet than to her studies.

She later resisted any arranged marriage, choosing in 1943 to wed one of her mother’s friends, Ngo Dinh Nhu. Fifteen years her senior, he was from a prominent Hue family of Roman Catholics who opposed both French colonial rule and the Communist rebels. Tran Le Xuan, raised a Buddhist, embraced her new family’s faith as well as its politics.

As World War II ended, Vietnam’s battle for independence intensified. In 1946, Communist troops overran Hue, taking Madame Nhu, her infant daughter and aging mother-in-law prisoner. They were held for four months in a remote village with little food and no comforts before being freed by the advancing French. After she was reunited with her husband, the family lived quietly for the next few years, an interlude that Madame Nhu would later refer to as her “happy time.” She and her husband would eventually have four children, two boys and two girls.

In 1955, Diem became president of the newly independent South Vietnam, his authority menaced by private armies, gangsters and disloyal officers like General Hinh. Madame Nhu publicly urged Diem to act. This only embarrassed him, and he exiled her to a convent in Hong Kong. Then he reconsidered, took her advice, smashed his opponents and forced Hinh into exile.

Madame Nhu returned, complaining that life in the convent had been “just like the Middle Ages.” But then, so was the lot of most Vietnamese women. After winning a seat in the National Assembly in 1956, Madame Nhu pushed through measures that increased women’s rights. She also orchestrated government moves to ban contraceptives and abortion, outlaw adultery, forbid divorce and close opium dens and brothels. “Society,” she declared, “cannot sacrifice morality and legality for a few wild couples.”

Meanwhile, she kept a tight emotional hold on the president. According to a C.I.A. report, Diem came to think of his sister-in-law like a spouse. She “relieves his tension, argues with him, needles him, and, like a Vietnamese wife, is dominant in the household,” the report said. It also said that their relationship was definitely not sexual. When Diem, who was notoriously prudish, once questioned the modesty of Madame Nhu’s low-cut dress, she was said to have snapped back: “It’s not your neck that sticks out, it’s mine. So shut up.”

In fact, both their lives were on the line. In 1962, renegade Vietnamese Air Force pilots bombed and strafed the presidential palace. Diem was not hurt. Madame Nhu fell through a bomb hole in her bedroom to the basement two floors below, suffering cuts and bruises.

Vietnamese officers were judged by their loyalty to Diem and Nhu, who kept their best troops close to Saigon, to the exasperation of the Americans. As Communist strength grew, the South’s internal stresses mounted. Diem sought compromise with dissidents, but he was undercut by the Nhus. In August 1963, thousands of Buddhists were arrested and interned. In Washington, Madame Nhu’s father declared that Diem’s government had done more damage than even the Communists and resigned as ambassador; her mother, South Vietnam’s observer at the United Nations, also quit. That fall, Madame Nhu went on an American speaking tour, criticizing Diem’s critics as soft on communism. She was in Los Angeles on Nov. 1 when news flashed that Diem and her husband had been shot to death in a coup. “The deaths were murders,” she told reporters, “either with the official or unofficial blessing of the American government.”

Refused permission to return to Vietnam, she and her children moved to Rome to be near her brother-in-law, Archbishop Ngo Dinh Thuc. In July 1966, in a vehemently anti-American interview with a French journalist, she expressed sympathy for the Vietnamese Communists and declared that America preaches “the liberty of the jungle.”

In 1967, her eldest daughter, Le Thuy, was killed in an automobile accident in France. In 1986, her parents were found strangled in their Washington home. Her brother, Khiem, was charged in the killings, motivated, according to the authorities, by the fact that he had been disinherited. In 1993, after seven years in a mental hospital, he was declared incompetent but harmless, and released.

As time passed, Madame Nhu declined to be interviewed, but in November 1986 she agreed to answer questions in an exchange of letters with The New York Times. In these statements she continued to blame the United States for the fall of South Vietnam and for her brother’s arrest. Asked to describe her daily life, she wrote, “Outer life such as writing and reading has never seemed interesting enough to be talked about, while inner life, more than a secret, is a mystery that cannot be so easily disclosed.”

Elisabetta Povoledo contributed reporting.

Last edited by xmod; April 27th, 2011 at 11:37 AM.
xmod no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 29th, 2011, 06:25 AM   #52
vttnguyen
Registered User
 
vttnguyen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 725
Likes (Received): 1

Vietnam arrests pastor of banned Mennonite church
Here we go again.

HANOI, Vietnam — Vietnamese authorities have arrested the pastor of an outlawed Mennonite church for allegedly sowing division between the government and citizens of this communist nation, state media reported Friday.

Nguyen Cong Chinh, 42, was taken into police custody in the central highland province of Gia Lai on Thursday, accused of undermining the government policy of unity, the Vietnam News said. He faces up to 15 years in jail if convicted.

The state-run newspaper said the charges stem from allegedly hostile comments Chinh posted on the Internet and interviews he gave to foreign media. It accused Chinh of disseminating distorted information and inciting people to protest.

Representatives for Chinh could not be reached for comment.

Vietnam's communist government has tight control over society and all churches must get government approval to operate.

http://xfinity.comcast.net/articles/...stor.Arrested/
vttnguyen no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 29th, 2011, 09:00 AM   #53
Siddude
Registered User
 
Siddude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Venice, CA
Posts: 933
Likes (Received): 15

I've been reading articles about the new repression in China. The Chicom are getting nervous about what is happening in the Middle East. Imagine if big boss China being scared of their own people, what does that mean for little brother VC? LOL Yeah, I'm sure VC are pretty nervous these days. Imagine what will happen one day if VC regime evaporated, then what will all the corrupt sons and daughters of VC officials overseas do???? No more ATM, no more loot to steal, how can baby VC survive in the Western, capitalist world where a person has to actually work for living?? )) More countries are throwing off despotism and dictatorship and not the other way around. Not one God damn country turn communist since VC had their victory party on April 30th, 1975!! So all the dumb wars and blood bath were a giant misunderstanding? LOL Who is the retard of history now?



http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/28/op...stof.html?_r=1

The reason? Surprising as it may seem, the government is worried that China could become the next Egypt or Tunisia, unless security forces act early and ruthlessly.

“Of course, they’re scared that the same thing might happen here,” one Chinese friend with family and professional ties to top leaders told me. A family member of another Chinese leader put it this way: “They’re just terrified. That’s why they’re cracking down.”
Siddude no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 30th, 2011, 04:33 AM   #54
0918181818
what's the life
 
0918181818's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: my heaven
Posts: 3,643
Likes (Received): 10

Vietnam government is increasingly expressed their arbitrary................too bad
__________________
Bạn l đại dương cn ti l sng biển
Đại dương buồn sng biển cũng mnh mng.
0918181818 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 1st, 2011, 04:41 AM   #55
coolink
BANNED
 
coolink's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Bồng Lai
Posts: 37,851
Likes (Received): 2298

Quote:
Originally Posted by xmod View Post
I didn't like her. She was egotistical and self-absorbed. Unfortunately, she set a terrible example for Vietnamese women that lasted decades.

Her quote about comparing self-immolating Buddhists to a barbecue showed how much of a sh**y person she was.

She was Vietnams Imelda Marcos, only a little worse and more destructive imo.

Madame Nhu, Vietnam War Lightning Rod, Dies

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/27/wo...pagewanted=all
Madame Nhu is bad, what about Sir Le Duan, Truong Trinh, killed Vietnamese by the galizion? what about uncle Ho? I assume he's an angel?

such angel chased away 1 million Vietnamese from the north to migrate south in 1954 to live with the evil Madame Nhu
coolink no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 1st, 2011, 04:46 AM   #56
coolink
BANNED
 
coolink's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Bồng Lai
Posts: 37,851
Likes (Received): 2298

Quote:
Originally Posted by doehomey View Post
A great poem that all should know (luckily in public domain now):

The Road Not Taken
by Robert Frost

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less travelled by,
And that has made all the difference.
this is mah poem

a great man post his post once and never editing
he shall editing too much he's no great man
great man no editing
bad man always editing and praise uncle Ho
coolink no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 1st, 2011, 10:06 AM   #57
coolink
BANNED
 
coolink's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Bồng Lai
Posts: 37,851
Likes (Received): 2298

Quote:
Originally Posted by doehomey View Post
Some people need a clock to show that they have a heart. Others need a medal to show that they have courage. Coolink's certificate will denote that Coolink definitely has a brain. Doehomey must bow before Coolink because Doehomey has no certificate. Doehomey does walk around with the bible to show that he has faith. Perhaps Coolink will visit Doehomey in Oz (Australia) one of these days?
australia is that where they teach 19th century English and devotion to communism?

if the clock is a heart then Commie in Vn now has no clock
if medal is courage then Commie in Vn nowadays has none, as we could tell they let Vnmese being bullied by China
if certificate is the only thing you have to show your education then you are sad

commies don't use bible stop lying
coolink no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 2nd, 2011, 10:30 PM   #58
xmod
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 141
Likes (Received): 0

Ahhhh..... South Vietnam's Dragon Lady (Madame Nhu) and Osama Bin Laden dying within days of one another.

What a good few days.
xmod no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 2nd, 2011, 11:50 PM   #59
coolink
BANNED
 
coolink's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Bồng Lai
Posts: 37,851
Likes (Received): 2298

tomorrow could be Vietcong.......lets cheer
coolink no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2011, 07:47 AM   #60
Siddude
Registered User
 
Siddude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Venice, CA
Posts: 933
Likes (Received): 15

Viet Cong Bin Laden is still alive in Vietnam. It's amazing how Viet Cong and Osama are so similar in their world view. Both have a hatred for the West and modernity. Both used terrorism exclusively. Both waged a fanatical holy war and both have two bit hypocrites who live in the West yet seek to destroy the very society that gave them equal right of free speech. Too bad Viet Cong Bin Laden is still alive in Vietnam.


Viet Cong planted a bomb in the Brinks Hotel in Saigon remember. Viet Cong targeted civilians with their artillery. Viet Cong carried out assassination of civil servants and teachers in SVN. Yeah, we know who you are Viet Cong!
Siddude no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
saigon, vietnam

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 05:58 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like v3.2.5 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu