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Old September 20th, 2004, 04:47 AM   #1
hkskyline
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REPORT | Flying the World : Concorde in New York

Even today, 32 years after the start of Concorde's commercial service, she remains the fastest and the highest-flying airliner in existence. The development of the Concorde began in the early 1960's and officially concluded with her entry into service in 1976. The Concorde is one of the finest examples of aviation engineering capable of flying at extremes of altitude and speed.

The Concorde is powered by four Rolls-Royce/SENECMA Olympus Mk. 610-14-28 engines. Each engine produces 38,050 pounds of thrust; this would propel the aircraft to her maximum operating a speed of Mach 2.04. In order to keep the aircraft light and keep the costs of production down, the Concorde's fuselage and wings are constructed of aluminum. At full speed and cruising altitude, despite outside temperatures of -55 Celsius (-67 Fahrenheit), the Concorde's skin would heat up to 127C (260.6 F) at the nose and 91C- 98C (196F-208F) on the fuselage and the wings. The Concorde carries between 90 and 100 passengers and is capable of covering 3,900 nautical miles without refueling.

The specific aircraft located at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum is registered under designation G-BOAD and is commonly referred to as “Alpha Delta.” The aircraft itself has a very interesting history. Manufactured under the serial number 100-010, it is the production variant 102. It flew for the first time on August 25, 1976 from Filton, England, and was delivered to British Airways (BA) on December 6, 1976 .

On February 7, 1996, “Alpha Delta” made the fastest Atlantic crossing of a Concorde, taking just 2 hours, 52 minutes, and 59 seconds. During her career, G-BOAD flew 23,397 hours, made 8,406 landings and underwent 7,010 supersonic cycles. The final flight of the “Alpha Delta” took place on November 10, 2003, and the aircraft was de-registered on May 4, 2004 .

More information : http://www.intrepidmuseum.org/progra..._boarding.html







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Old June 6th, 2005, 06:50 AM   #2
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Photo links fixed.
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Old June 6th, 2005, 06:56 AM   #3
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It's difficult for me to see the [still] most modern passenger jet ever built rot on a barge.
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Old December 23rd, 2005, 10:12 PM   #4
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oh man, I'd love to fly on a concorde
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Old December 23rd, 2006, 08:18 AM   #5
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Concorde Jet Moves to Temporary NYC Home
22 December 2006

NEW YORK (AP) - A Concorde jetliner that is a featured attraction at New York's Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum arrived Friday at its temporary new home in Brooklyn.

The sleek white supersonic aircraft was moved by barge to historic Floyd Bennett Field, according to Intrepid museum officials. The plane will be open to visitors there during an 18-month rebuilding of the Intrepid's Hudson River pier.

The barge towed the plane to the end of the field's seaplane ramp, said museum spokeswoman Suzanne Halpin. From there, the Concorde was lifted by crane onto a runway and towed, on its own wheels, to the new location.

The one-time Mach 2 flier is the last major item to vacate Pier 86 in Manhattan, where the historic aircraft carrier USS Intrepid had been docked since it became a floating museum in 1982. The Intrepid was moved Dec. 6 to a Bayonne, N.J., shipyard for an extensive overhaul. It was joined last week by the USS Growler, a 1960s-vintage missile submarine.

Museum officials said the renovation of the 64-year-old World War II carrier and the rebuilding of the Hudson River dock should take 18 months to two years.

The 203-foot Concorde jet is known as Alpha Delta. It once held the trans-Atlantic speed record of 2 hours, 53 minutes, set in 1996.

The world's only supersonic transport, the Concorde began flying commercially in 1969 but never turned a profit for the joint British-French company that designed and built it. Its financial problems worsened after a French Concorde crashed near Paris in 2000, killing 109 people, and the planes were retired from service in 2003.

Floyd Bennett Field is named for a pilot who had flown Admiral Richard E. Byrd, a polar explorer, over the North Pole in 1926. It opened in 1931 as New York City's municipal airport and was used by such aviation pioneers as Wiley Post, Amelia Earhart and Howard Hughes.

Today, the field is used primarily by police and fire helicopters, advertising blimps and aviation exhibitions.
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Old December 23rd, 2006, 12:12 PM   #6
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i heard they were thinking of designing a better concorde ... hopefully another concorde will rise hehe!
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Old January 13th, 2007, 06:42 AM   #7
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I don't think there's a business case to sell it to airlines yet. Luxury travel, even along the lucrative transatlantic sector, is starting to come back with business-class-dedicated airlines. But having one or two very unique planes plough the route may not be cost-efficient for airlines to swallow anymore.
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Old January 19th, 2007, 01:25 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oz.fil View Post
i heard they were thinking of designing a better concorde ... hopefully another concorde will rise hehe!
I'd love to see a Concorde-like aircraft plying the current 14 hour LAX-SYD route. How would you like to hop across the Pacific in about 6 hours?
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Old January 26th, 2007, 06:29 PM   #9
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I love this plane.
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Old April 17th, 2009, 06:28 AM   #10
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Concorde's fate offers a lesson for finance
16 April 2009
Financial Times

The supersonic Concorde aircraft was considered in the 20th century to be the most sophisticated airliner, flying at twice the speed of sound. Its crash in Paris on July 25 2000 destroyed this confidence. Some blamed the crash on metal fragments from another aircraft; others argued that Concorde was overweight and unbalanced. The accident led to some design modifications but in 2003 Concorde was in effect jettisoned in favour of subsonic aircraft, much slower but easier to maintain.

It is not too much of a stretch to compare the global financial system of the pre-subprime era to Concorde. It was fiercely innovative and grew at a record pace for close to two decades, only to suffer a new type of hard landing without clarity as to whether it was the fault of the system's pilots or also of those regulating its maintenance.

While possible faults in piloting and maintenance of the financial system are many, the biggest contributor appears to be that capital allocation at large, complex financial institutions (universal banks, investment banks, insurance companies and, in some cases, even hedge funds) was broken, focusing myopically on circumventing capital requirements at the expense of long-term economic value creation.

For the current global market crisis, the primary fault lies with the pilots. These bankers and insurers paid themselves large cash bonuses by deceptively booking the income from triple A rated mortgage-backed securities as profits and ignoring their long-run risk/return trade-off.

But the regulatory maintenance cannot escape blame altogether. In fact, its cracks made the system vulnerable to pilot errors in the first place. In a world without regulation, creditors of financial institutions would curb risk and leverage by charging a higher cost of funding and designing tight contracts and covenants. But, in the world we have lived in, government guarantees (such as deposit insurance and "too-big-to-fail" policies) have been offered virtually for free and the financial risks have been socialised even as profits remain private.

For years regulation has targeted individual bank risk, when it should instead be managing systemic risk. Financial institutions will attempt to exploit government guarantees if that is in the interest of shareholders. That is what they are paid to do. So it is imperative to price the guarantees right.

Where should the regulators start to fix the system? Four changes seem paramount: • Change the compensation and incentive structure of traders and profit centres at large, complex financial institutions to provide reserve accounts that grow ("pay a bonus") on good performance and shrink (a "malus") on bad performance, essentially bringing clawbacks into compensation schemes. • Prevent obvious regulatory arbitrage and charge for socialised risks - deposit insurance, too big to fail, temporary loan guarantees and the like - with pricing schemes that reflect -balance-sheet leverage and risk in a continual manner. This will discourage size and risk distortions in a market-orientated way - rather than by fiat - and impose higher charges in good times if they lead to bigger banks and more leverage. • Quantify the systemic risk of large, complex financial institutions and "tax" their contributions to systemic risk through capital requirements, or deposit insurance fees, or mandatory insurance purchases from private and public sectors. The need for a systemic risk regulator who performs this role and manages the failure of these institutions is only underscored by the growing size of the few remaining operators in the financial arena. • Enforce greater transparency of over-the-counter derivatives and off-balance-sheet transactions, using centralised clearing for standardised products such as credit default swaps and indices and keeping central registries with trade transparency for all others.

The recent meeting of the Group of 20 went some way to set the system to rights. First, there seems to be general agreement that regulators should work together on a core set of principles. Without such an agreement financial institutions will be able to cherry-pick their jurisdictions. Second, at least from our point of view, the G20 has homed in on most of the important threshold issues, especially the focus on systemic risk, opacity and compensation within the financial system.

We think the issues of implicit and explicit government guarantees (the second point above) warrant far more air-time at future G20 meetings. A solution as simple as pricing these guarantees at the appropriate market rate will help solve the problem, as higher fees for higher systemic risk and leverage will organically lead these institutions to lower their risk profiles.

Some say that the reforms being proposed are against the spirit of capitalism. We think the presence of government guarantees for systemically important institutions is a given. So ignoring them is unlikely to lead to pure capitalistic outcomes. Others say the reforms will inhibit financial innovation. We think this view also gets the issue wrong. The goal is not to have the most advanced financial system, but one that is reasonably advanced and robust. That is also what we seek in other areas of human activity. We do not use the most advanced aircraft to move millions of people around the world. We use reasonably advanced aircraft whose designs have proved to be reliable.

The global financial system may never return to its golden age. Like Concorde, it will be replaced by a somewhat slower but more stable engine that is less prone to very costly hard landings.

The authors are professors who have contributed to the recently published Restoring Financial Stability: How to Repair a Failed System
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Old April 18th, 2009, 07:37 AM   #11
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Does the concorde still in New york city?
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Old April 18th, 2009, 08:22 AM   #12
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R.I.P. Concorde....

I loved so much that airplane...
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Old April 18th, 2009, 08:28 AM   #13
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I still can't get over the fact that, in this case, yesterday's technology is better that the current one
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Old April 18th, 2009, 10:35 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by santobonao View Post
Does the concorde still in New york city?
Are you asking if the concorde still flies to New York?

The answer is no, as the articles mentioned many times, there are no concordes in service any more. There haven't been any in commercial service for years.
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Old April 18th, 2009, 03:57 PM   #15
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I think he meant the one on display at the USS Intrepid. I recall it was taken away for a while but should eventually get back to that museum.
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Old January 30th, 2010, 09:02 PM   #16
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TIMELINE-Concorde's development and service
29 January 2010

Jan 29 (Reuters) - U.S. carrier Continental Airlines and five individuals will stand trial on Monday over the 2000 crash of an Air France Concorde that killed 113 people, a prosecutor's statement said.

The judge said the defendants, including the man who oversaw the development of the Franco-British supersonic airliner, would be charged with involuntary manslaughter. Following is a timeline on the Concorde.

March 2, 1969 - Concorde makes its maiden flight when the French-built 001 prototype takes off from Toulouse, France. British prototype 002 makes its maiden flight a month later.

Jan 21, 1976 - British Airways begins its first regular Concorde service from London to Bahrain. Air France begins a service from Paris to Rio de Janeiro.

May 24, 1976 - Concorde begins flights to Washington from London and Paris.

Nov 22, 1977 - After two years of legal wrangling, Concorde begins regular commercial flights to New York from London and Paris.

April 20, 1979 - The 16th and last production Concorde makes its first flight.

Nov 1, 1980 - British Airways terminates its Concorde service to Bahrain and Singapore due to lack of demand.

March 1985 - Concorde breaks the speed record from London to Cape Town, covering the 6,000 miles in eight hours and eight minutes, three hours faster than a Boeing 747 in 1977.

April 14, 1989 - British air safety officials order checks on all the British Concorde fleet after one plane loses half its rudder over the Tasman Sea but lands safely. It is the first major incident in more than 20 years of flying.

March 21, 1992 - A BA Concorde loses a large section of its upper rudder during a flight from London to New York.

Feb 7, 1996 - Concorde makes its fastest transatlantic crossing in 2 hours 52 minutes and 59 seconds, beating its own record set in 1990 by one minute 30 seconds.

July 24, 2000 - British Airways says it has detected cracks in the wings of its seven Concordes, causing one plane to be grounded, but says there is no danger to passengers.

July 25, 2000 - An Air France Concorde crashes just after takeoff from Paris Charles de Gaulle airport, killing all 109 on board and four people on the ground.

Nov 7, 2001 - Concorde returns to service with transatlantic flights resuming from London and Paris.

Nov 27, 2002 - Part of one of Concorde's four rudders falls off during a British Airways flight from London to New York. The flight lands safely and no injury was caused.

Feb 19, 2003 - An Air France Concorde carrying 56 people to New York from Paris makes emergency landing in Halifax, Nova Scotia, after an engine malfunction.

Feb 26, 2003 - British Airways says reviewing possible retirement of Concorde.

Oct 24, 2003 - British Airways runs its last commercial flight when 100 celebrities, VIPs and reporters flew from New York to London. Air France retired its fleet in May.

Nov. 26, 2003 - Concorde returns to Bristol on its very last flight from London's Heathrow.

Dec 14, 2004 - A judicial investigation into the 2000 crash concludes that a piece of metal left on the runway from a Continental flight caused one of the Air France Concorde's tyres to burst on takeoff and send debris into an engine. March 12, 2008 - A French public prosecutor has asked judges to bring manslaughter charges against U.S. carrier Continental Airlines over the 2000 crash of Concorde.

Feb. 2, 2010 - Manslaughter trial against Continental begins.
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Old February 1st, 2010, 03:49 AM   #17
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wow...Cockpit was sooo old
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Old February 1st, 2010, 02:16 PM   #18
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sad to see such beauty not flying anymore
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Old February 2nd, 2010, 12:33 PM   #19
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Concorde crash trial to analyze accident that ended aviation dream
2 February 2010

PARIS (AP) - Ten years after an Air France Concorde crashed, killing 113 people and foreshadowing the end of the jet that embodied elegance at supersonic speed, a French court on Tuesday begins probing an elusive question: Who was to blame?

The trial in Pontoise, north of Paris, could last four months as the court debates who should be held responsible for the July 25, 2000 crash of the jet, which plunged into a hotel minutes after takeoff from Charles de Gaulle airport, trailing a tail of flames.

Houston-headquartered Continental Airlines, Inc. and two of its U.S. employees are among those on trial for manslaughter. Investigators have long argued that the crash was triggered by a metal strip lying on the runway that had fallen from a Continental DC-10 minutes before.

Continental's lawyer plans to argue the plane caught fire before it reached the debris and says the American company was a convenient scapegoat.

Besides pointing at Continental, the prosecution also accuses French officials of neglecting to fix known design weaknesses in the jet. The Concorde, capable of flying at twice the speed of sound, was the pride of commercial aviation -- though never a financial success -- before both Air France and British Airways retired it in 2003.

Two others on trial for manslaughter were employed by Aerospatiale, the precursor of plane-maker Airbus, while the fifth is an employee of the French civilian aviation authority. Their lawyers say they were not to blame and argue the crash could not have been predicted.

As the trial opened, several lawyers said they had asked the court to call off the proceedings on a technicality. Olivier Metzner, the lawyer for Continental, and Daniel Soulez Lariviere, representing longtime aviation official Claude Frantzen, said the document ordering the trial failed to provide counterweights to the accusations against their clients, as is required.

The crash killed 109 people on the plane, mostly German tourists, and four people on the ground. Compensation is not a major issue in the trial, and most of the victims' families received settlements long ago. Most have also remained silent and are not taking part in the proceedings, though family members of pilot Christian Marty are civil parties, with their lawyer saying they want answers.

In the years after the Concorde crashed, both French aviation and judicial investigators concluded that the Continental DC-10's metal piece -- known as a wear strip -- gashed the Concorde's tire, sending pieces of rubber into the fuel tanks, which caused a fire.

Continental lawyer Metzner says he plans to present testimony from about 20 witnesses who say they spotted a small fire aboard the Concorde before it reached the metal strip. He says the Concorde had trouble spots and says that particular plane was overloaded and took off missing a piece to stabilize the wheels.

Continental mechanic John Taylor, 41, is accused of violating guidelines by replacing the DC-10's wear strip with titanium instead of the softer metal usually called for, aluminum. Maintenance chief Stanley Ford, 70, is on trial for validating the strip's installation.

French aviation investigators deemed the chain of events that led to the crash unpredictable. But a French judicial inquiry determined that the plane's fuel tanks lacked sufficient protection from shock, and that officials had been aware of the problem since a series of incidents in 1979.

The three other men accused of manslaughter in the case are Henri Perrier, 80, ex-chief of the Concorde program at plane maker Aerospatiale from 1978 to 1994; Jacques Herubel, 74, a top Aerospatiale engineer at Concorde from 1993-95; and Frantzen, 72, who handled the Concorde program in various roles at the French civil aviation authority.

Manslaughter charges can carry penalties of up to five years in prison and a euro75,000 ($104,000) fine, but observers say suspended prison sentences are more likely in this case.
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Old February 4th, 2010, 08:48 AM   #20
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Concorde trial starts in France 10 years after crash

PONTOISE, France, Feb 2 (Reuters) - Continental Airlines and five men went on trial on Tuesday for their alleged role in the crash of an Air France Concorde that killed 113 people in 2000 and hastened the end of luxury supersonic travel.

The Concorde, carrying mostly German tourists, caught fire as it roared out of Paris's Charles de Gaulle airport on 25 July 2000 and crashed just minutes later into a nearby hotel.

Investigators believe a Continental DC10 triggered the disaster when a small metal strip fell from it onto the runway. This punctured the Concorde's tyres during take off, spraying debris into the underwing fuel tanks and sparking the fire.

U.S. carrier Continental has always denied responsibility and has questioned the safety record of the ageing, drop-nosed Concorde.

The trial, held at a modern court house in the small town of Pontoise, some 30 km (18.5 miles) north of Paris, could have wide-ranging implications for the way the airline industry maintains its planes and the stringency of security measures.

Continental and the five individuals, including three elderly French aviation experts, are charged with involuntary manslaughter. If found guilty, Continental faces a 375,000 euro ($521,700) fine and possibly substantial damages, while the men risk 5 years imprisonment and a 75,000 euro fine.

The judge started proceedings by reading out the names of the 109 Concorde passengers and crew and four hotel employees on the ground who died in the inferno.

The trial is expected to run until May 28.

Roland Rappaport, a lawyer representing the family of the pilot of the doomed Concorde said investigations had established a clear link between the bursting of the Concorde's tyre and the piece of metal which had fallen on the runway.

"The essential question in this trial is to find out why, when a tyre bursts, an airplane crashes," Rappaport said.

"If the explosion of a tyre on a runway is enough to give rise to a tragedy of this kind, then travel by air must be stopped," he told reporters.

DESIGN FLAWS

Continental's lawyer Olivier Metzner has said what is at stake at the trial is what he described as Continental's excellent reputation which the airline did not want destroyed.

The accused men are John Taylor, a welder who had fixed the metal strip onto the Continental plane, and his supervisor, Stanley Ford. Neither was in court on Tuesday and it was not clear if they planned to attend the trial at any stage.

The three French defendants were Henri Perrier, the head of testing of the Concorde programme before becoming its director, and Jacques Herubel, the plane's former chief engineer, who have been faulted for failing to spot and then rectify design flaws.

Claude Frantzen, the former head of France's civil aviation body, is accused of failing to order changes to the Concorde when problems over its tyres first emerged, well before 2000.

Air France, which paid millions of dollars in compensation to families of the victims, has escaped blame for the disaster.

The fleet of Concordes operated by Air France and British Airways were grounded after the crash and the jets' fuel tanks were strengthened. The planes returned to service in 2001 but were finally withdrawn from the skies in 2003.

Metzner, said he would present witnesses disputing the version of events presented by investigators, adding that there were doubts about the maintenance and safety record of the Concorde.

"I question the independence of the investigators, I question those who did not want the truth, I question Air France and it is evident that on July 25, 2000, the Concorde should never have been allowed to take off," Metzner told reporters.
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