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Old May 13th, 2011, 10:45 PM   #21
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Old May 14th, 2011, 10:11 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackraven View Post
@hkskyline

Man, TRTC must really have a lot of money in their hands to pursue such scale of expansion?

However, would their be a point *in the future* where TRTC can't build anymore train lines...........because they've covered the entirety of Taipei (incl. country and Keelung)???

What happens after that?
Taipei is actually quite spread out, and the subway coverage isn't too great. There have been aggressive plans spurred by politics to increase the subway network's coverage. Hence, expect new lines and extensions to come online over the next few years.

Keelung is not connected to Taipei by the MRT network at all, but by national rail and intercity bus.
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Old May 14th, 2011, 11:30 AM   #23
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Old May 17th, 2011, 06:13 AM   #24
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That's what I was wondering…
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Old May 19th, 2011, 05:19 AM   #25
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map 2011



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Old May 19th, 2011, 07:23 PM   #26
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PAST AT A GLANCE:-

In 1967, the government of the Republic of China researched the possibility of constructing a rapid transit network in the Taipei metropolitan area; however, the plan was shelved due to fiscal concerns and the belief that such a system was not urgently needed at the time. With the increase of traffic congestion accompanying economic growth in the 1970s, the need for a rapid transit system became more pressing. In February 1977, the Institute of Transportation (IOT) of the Ministry of Transportation and Communications (MOTC) produced a preliminary rapid transport system report, with the designs of five lines, including U1, U2, U3, S1, and S2, to form a rough sketch of the planned corridors, resulting in the first rapid transit system plan for Taipei.

In 1981, the IOT invited British Mass Transit Consultants (BMTC) and China Engineering Consultants, Inc. to form a team and provide in-depth research on the preliminary report. In 1982, the Taipei City Government commissioned National Chiao Tung University to do a research and feasibility study on medium-capacity rapid transit systems. In January 1984, the university proposed an initial design for a medium-capacity rapid transit system in Taipei City, including plans for Line 1 and Line 2 of the medium-capacity metro system. On March 1, 1985, the Executive Yuan Council for Economic Planning and Development signed a treaty with the Taipei Transit Council (TTC), made up of three American consultant firms, to do overall research on a rapid transit system in metropolitan Taipei. Apart from corrections made to the initial proposal, Line 1 of the medium-capacity metro system was also included into the network. In 1986, the initial network design of the Taipei Metro by the Council for Economic Planning and Development was passed by the Executive Yuan although the network corridors were not yet set.
In 1987, the Department of Rapid Transit Systems (DORTS) was established. Apart from preparing for the construction of the metro system, DORTS also made small changes to the metro corridor. The 6 lines proposed on the initial network were: Danshui Line, Xindian Line, Zhonghe Line, Nangang/Banqiao Line, Muzha Line, and Neihu Line.

The Executive Yuan approved the initial network plan for the system on May 27, 1986. Construction on the TRTS began on December 15, 1988. The growing traffic problems of the time, compounded by road closures due to TRTS construction led to what became popularly known as the "Dark Age of Taipei Traffic". The TRTS was the center of political controversy during its construction and shortly after the opening of its first line in 1996 due to incidents such as computer malfunction during a thunderstorm, alleged structural problems in some elevated segments, budget overruns, and fare prices.

The system opened AS A RUBBER TYRED METRO on March 28, 1996, with the 10.5 km (6.5 mi) elevated Muzha Line, a medium-capacity line with twelve stations running from Zhongshan Junior High School to Taipei Zoo. The first high-capacity line, the Danshui Line, was opened on March 28, 1997 running from Danshui to Zhongshan Station.

On December 24, 1999, a section of the Banqiao/Nangang Line was opened between Longshan Temple and Taipei City Hall. This section became the first east-west line running through the city, connecting the two previously completed north-south lines. On May 31, 2006, the second stage of the Banqiao/Nangang Line and the Tucheng Line began operation.
On July 4, 2009, with the opening of the Neihu Line, the last of the six original lines was completed. Due to controversy on whether to construct a medium-capacity or high-capacity line, construction of the line did not begin until 2002.

28 March 1996 - Muzha Line Taipei Zoo - Zhongshan Jr. High School (RUBBER TYRED)
25 Dec. 1997 - Danshui Line Danshui / Xinbeitou - Main Station ( Zinbeitou line is now operated as a branch by single EMU's from 7:00 to 21:00 because of noise problems).
24 Dec. 1998 - Zhonghe Line Main Station - Guting – Nanshijiao
11 Nov. 1999 - Xindian Line Guting – Xindian
http://www.urbanrail.net/as/taip/Muzha-Line2.jpg24 Dec. 1999 - Blue Line Taipei City Hall - Longshan Temple
31 Aug. 2000 - Blue Line Longshan Temple - Xinpu
31 Aug. 2000 - Xiaonanmen Line Ximen - C.K.S. Memorial Hall
29 Dec. 2000 - Blue Line Taipei City Hall - Kunyang
29 Sept. 2004 - Xindian Line - branch Qizhang - Xiaobitan
31 May 2006 - Blue Line Xinpu - Yongning
25 Dec 2008 - Blue Line Kunyang - Nangang
04 July 2009 - Neihu Line Zhongshan Jr. High School - Taipei Nangang Exhibition Center (RUBBER TYRED, extension of Muzhal Line)
03 Nov 2010 - Luzhou Line Zhongxiao Xinsheng - Luzhou (12.5 km, 11 stations)

The missing link between Zhongxiao Xinsheng and Guting will be opened this year.
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Old May 23rd, 2011, 11:45 PM   #27
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Taipei didn’t continue rubber tired metro in past. Only after opening line 1 (Muzha), they understood that rubber tired trains are much costly than conventional steel wheeled trains, and has not so much high capacity, which is not sufficient for such a big city like Taipei. So later lines were built as ordinary metro lines.

But I’m exclaimed to know that they are again returning to rubber tired metro!!! Future line 8 (Circular), line 9 (Danhai), line 10 (Wanda – Shulin) and line 11 (Xizhi) is planned to make as rubber tired metro. But don’t they know that this will be not feasible? Where many cities, which has formerly opened rubber tired lines (like Santiago), later changed to steel wheeled lines.

So why Taipei is walking backwards, and planning to expense much higher???
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Old May 24th, 2011, 12:52 AM   #28
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Well, not 100%-true, many cities just have built the rubber tyred metros also. Like new lines in: Torino, Toulouse. The discussion of rubber vs. steel is very old. And there are always many 'pros' and 'contras'. There isnt something like "the only true way" or "the only one solution" in that matter.
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Old May 24th, 2011, 04:10 PM   #29
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I agree with Ashis, Taipei Metro should not build anymore medium capacity rubber wheeled trains. the Neihu-Muzha line is always over crowded and the trains run so slow. The new lines should be high capacity traditional steel wheeled rails. Circular line will be situated in New Taipei City which is very populated. The problem with department of transport is that they dont plan for the future. If they build a metro station, it will drive growth in the area. More and more people are moving to Taipei for more job opportunities and most of those people are living in New Taipei City (because its cheaper) so a decent metro is needed there. New Taipei City has a population of more than 4 million compared to the just above 2 million for Taipei City. I hope they will do another feasibility study before they lay the rails.
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Old May 24th, 2011, 07:30 PM   #30
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Thanks to all supporting me.

I’ve some questions (arose after viewing some websites). Please answer one by one –
1) Will blue line be extended from Nangang to Nangang Exhibition Center and from Yongning to Dingpu?
2) Will orange line be extended from Zhongxiao Xinsheng to Guting and from Daqiao Elementary School to Huilong?
3) Will red line be extended from Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall to Guangci Care Home?
4) Will green line be extended from Songshan to Ximen?
5) Will a new yellow line will be constructed from Wugu Industrial Park to Dapinglin?
6) Will a new light green line line will be constructed from Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall to Huilong?
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Old May 25th, 2011, 04:23 PM   #31
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I’ve some questions (arose after viewing some websites). Please answer one by one –
1) Will blue line be extended from Nangang to Nangang Exhibition Center and from Yongning to Dingpu?
Yes and Nankang exhibition hall station is already open

2) Will orange line be extended from Zhongxiao Xinsheng to Guting and from Daqiao Elementary School to Huilong?

Yes, March 2012 to Xinzhuang, June 2012 to Guting and maybe 2014 to Huilong.

3) Will red line be extended from Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall to Guangci Care Home?
Yes
4) Will green line be extended from Songshan to Ximen?
Yes
5) Will a new yellow line will be constructed from Wugu Industrial Park to Dapinglin?
6) Will a new light green line line will be constructed from Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall to Huilong?
Yes to (3), (4), (5), (6)
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Old May 26th, 2011, 06:37 PM   #32
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Nankang exhibition center station (Neihu Line )

image hosted on flickr


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Nankang exhibition center station (blue line)

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Last edited by p75215p; May 26th, 2011 at 07:24 PM.
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Old May 26th, 2011, 07:00 PM   #33
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Neihu Line

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image hosted on flickr




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Last edited by p75215p; May 26th, 2011 at 07:40 PM.
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Old May 26th, 2011, 08:36 PM   #34
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The stations look utilitarian but functional. People lined up for the trains that is missed in most Chinese subway systems. I noticed that the English translation using the Mainland Chinese PinYin system. Interesting.
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Old May 26th, 2011, 08:48 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Lotus View Post
The stations look utilitarian but functional. People lined up for the trains that is missed in most Chinese subway systems. I noticed that the English translation using the Mainland Chinese PinYin system. Interesting.
MRT signs have always been in Hanyu.
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Old May 27th, 2011, 12:34 AM   #36
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Please try to answer these -
1) What is the target year of opening the extensions of blue, orange red & green line?
2) Will a new olive line will be constructed from Dadaocheng to Xizhi?
3) Will yellow line be extended from Jiannan Road to Xiulong Bridge?
4) Will brown line be extended from Taipei Zoo to Shiding Service Area?
5) What is the target year of opening new yellow, light green line?
6) Left side, right side or both side, - which type of platforms are in most numbers in Taipei subway network?
7) Elevated, ground level or underground, - which type of stations are in most numbers in Taipei subway network?
8) Which are the highest and deepest stations of Taipei metro?
9) Which is the busiest metro station?
10) Which stations has interchange facility with suburban rail network?
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Old May 27th, 2011, 08:27 PM   #37
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Question 1 to 5, please see Wikipedia answer, its quite accurate.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taipei_Metro

Q6: different lines uses different sides. The high capacity lines (blue, red and green) have their platform in the middle so train bound right and left of the platform. The brown line have trains coming in the middle and platform on each side.

Q7: Brown line is mostly elevated except the at Songshan Airport precinct which is underground. The redline is half elevated (from Chongshan to Danshui), half underground (rest of the line, i think). A little bit of the red line is ground level just before you reach Danshui. The blue line is all underground if i remember correctly. I think the public wants the metro to be fully underground but due to budget and soil conditions, the Taipei Metro company and government have other plans. The Neihu line was heavily protested when they changed the original design from underground to elevated. I think in terms of stations, theres more underground stations than elevated, non of the stations are on ground level.

Q8: I am not sure about the the highest station, all elevated stations are about the same height but I think the deepest station is Taipei Main Station because Taiwan high speed rail, Taiwan Rail administration (suburban rail), Red line, blue line and more lines (including the Airport express currently underway) are all passing through at the same station. At Taipei Main station, there's also deep underground malls.

Q9: Busiest metro station is Taipei Main station and Chongxiao Fuxing (where blue crosses the brown)

Q10: Taipei Main Station, Banqiao Station and New Nangang station will all have the blue line, suburban rail and Taiwan High speed Rail platforms on it. The future taipei metro map have clear indications of these.

I am not living in Taiwan at the moment so I might not be very updated but I follow most of the threads so the info should be right.

Hope I answered your question.
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Old May 28th, 2011, 08:15 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lolstebbo View Post
MRT signs have always been in Hanyu.
Wade-Giles was used for MRT signs until recent years. Hanyu is actually new.
However, Taiwan's major city or county names are still in Wade-Giles system, such as Taipei(Taibei in Hanyu) and Kaohsiung(Gaoxiong).
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Old May 28th, 2011, 10:55 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Lotus View Post
The stations look utilitarian but functional. People lined up for the trains that is missed in most Chinese subway systems. I noticed that the English translation using the Mainland Chinese PinYin system. Interesting.
The elevated APM lines have always had basic station designs brightened up by clever use of colours, whereas the other heavy-capacity lines are strictly business in appearance. The scourge of line cutters is basically nonexistent in Taiwan...always appreciated!
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Old May 29th, 2011, 12:04 AM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taihoku_Formosa View Post
Wade-Giles was used for MRT signs until recent years. Hanyu is actually new.
However, Taiwan's major city or county names are still in Wade-Giles system, such as Taipei(Taibei in Hanyu) and Kaohsiung(Gaoxiong).
Really? It's been Hanyu for as long as I can remember. *shrugs* Oh well.
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