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Old June 7th, 2016, 01:04 AM   #981
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
But, why one does need to know how many km is the border far away?
It's more useful to know the distance to the next significant city/ies, either before or across the border, that are likely destinations for many motorists.
If I'm driving, for example, on Italian A22 northbound, I'm probably more interested to know how far away are, for example, Bolzano or Innsbruck (that are quite large, so likely final destinantion for many drivers), rather than the distance to Brenner Pass (that is just a transit place, rarely becoming a final destination).
Some transit points are either really well known or otherwise describe a route much better than the towns around them. In such a situation, signposting the transit point is a sensible decision. It is then of little relevance that the transit point is not a final destination for many motorists. Road signs (and distance signs in particular) are also there to reassure the motorist. Reassurance also involves a confirmation where you find yourself relative to an important waypoint. This justifies signposting a major intersection, a town next to a major intersection, the next exit, a mountain pass and indeed a border crossing.

However, this does leave the question when you should signpost a transit point. Surely only when it's got a certain relevance for a good proportion of the drivers unfamiliar in the area. Transit points far away are not particularly likely to be very relevant. Which of course applies to road termini as well. Rather than re-discussing specific issues, let's leave it at the point that Italian issues like Gravellona Toce (common defence: "but everyone just knows that road as Genova Voltri - Gravellona Toce") and Polish border villages all revolve around an understanding of relevance that deviates from the thinking in other countries.
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Last edited by -Pino-; June 7th, 2016 at 02:21 PM. Reason: Typo
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Old June 7th, 2016, 08:59 AM   #982
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
But, why one does need to know how many km is the border far away?
It's more useful to know the distance to the next significant city/ies, either before or across the border, that are likely destinations for many motorists.
If I'm driving, for example, on Italian A22 northbound, I'm probably more interested to know how far away are, for example, Bolzano or Innsbruck (that are quite large, so likely final destinantion for many drivers), rather than the distance to Brenner Pass (that is just a transit place, rarely becoming a final destination).
Slightly offtopic, but Brenner Pass is an important route regardless the fact that it is also a border crossing point, as it is one of the few routes across the mountains. For comparison, Gotthard is neither a populated destination nor a border crossing, and still signposted around Switzerland.
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Old June 8th, 2016, 04:58 AM   #983
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
But, why one does need to know how many km is the border far away?
It's more useful to know the distance to the next significant city/ies, either before or across the border, that are likely destinations for many motorists.
If I'm driving, for example, on Italian A22 northbound, I'm probably more interested to know how far away are, for example, Bolzano or Innsbruck (that are quite large, so likely final destinantion for many drivers), rather than the distance to Brenner Pass (that is just a transit place, rarely becoming a final destination).
Might be useful when you buy the fuel - if it's cheaper in the next country, and you are running out of it, you want to take only so much to get to the border, and then tank the cheaper one in the country on the other side. But is here giving the distance to the border anyhow useful? I don't know.
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Old June 8th, 2016, 04:32 PM   #984
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Even in the Schengen area, I see merit in signposting the distance to the border and the last exit before the border. Even if you don't need to show a passport to cross a border, people might want to postpone their fuel stops. And perhaps more importantly, avoid crossing a border because they are somehow prevented under economic regulations, e.g. the German restrictions against lorries in weekends, levies on importing alcohol or cigarettes in the EU etc.

It's just not a relevant piece of data when you're still hundreds of kilometres away from the border.
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Old June 9th, 2016, 04:10 AM   #985
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I kind of like to have the information
But maybe it is best to just have it as a "alternate reference"
for example (in one direction at least), the km-markers and exit numbers...
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Old July 5th, 2016, 10:42 AM   #986
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Malmö sign south of Copenhagen


The first sign of Malmö, Sweden when approaching Copenhagen from the south on the E20/E47.

(screenshot from my timelapse video)

Malmö is written Malmø with the danish letter for "ö" while Copenhagen is written in swedish on the swedish E20. Maybe the could add a letter as "S" for Sweden after the foreign city like they do in continental europe.
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Old July 5th, 2016, 11:36 PM   #987
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Rather unusual location for Paris on a road sign:
https://goo.gl/maps/gmbUC7nYAxs

And it's never mentioned again between the sign and the border.
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Old July 6th, 2016, 09:45 AM   #988
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NordikNerd View Post

The first sign of Malmö, Sweden when approaching Copenhagen from the south on the E20/E47.

(screenshot from my timelapse video)

Malmö is written Malmø with the danish letter for "ö" while Copenhagen is written in swedish on the swedish E20. Maybe the could add a letter as "S" for Sweden after the foreign city like they do in continental europe.
I just realized that the "S" is not there. Can't remember how it looks for Helsingborg going to Helsingör or Helsingör and Copenhagen on the swedish motorway.

But the lack of it shows a closer connection I think, perhaps neighbouring countries or cities as close as that should not have it. But then again, it may confuse tourists or national citizen coming from further away in the country.
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Old July 6th, 2016, 10:37 AM   #989
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Helsingborg sign in Helsingör

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Originally Posted by Festin View Post
I just realized that the "S" is not there. Can't remember how it looks for Helsingborg going to Helsingör or Helsingör and Copenhagen on the swedish motorway.

But the lack of it shows a closer connection I think, perhaps neighbouring countries or cities as close as that should not have it. But then again, it may confuse tourists or national citizen coming from further away in the country.
Yes. It may confuse tourists without any knowledge in scandinavian geography. Also Denmark-Sweden does not have the same amount of transit traffic as in continental europe, so a national letter is not necessary here.


Helsingborg sign in Helsingör has a sign for a ferry.
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Old July 29th, 2016, 01:20 AM   #990
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Ukrainian city first time at Slovak traffic sign. Correct English transliteration
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Old July 29th, 2016, 04:21 PM   #991
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Ukrainian city first time at Slovak traffic sign. Correct English transliteration
Strange, considering that SK and UA are neighbouring countries. Did they just signposted 'Ukraine', before?
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old July 29th, 2016, 04:29 PM   #992
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Maybe you wanted to say "Roman" transliteration?
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Old July 29th, 2016, 05:05 PM   #993
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Roman and English. If it were transliterated the Slovak way, it would say Užhorod. Although locals seem to call it Uzhgorod.
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Old July 29th, 2016, 07:44 PM   #994
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FYI, this is the Soviet-times monument (or whatever, dunno how to name this structure), and it was made by Russians, not Ukrainians. Locals(mostly speaking Ukrainian and/or Slovakian and/or Hungarian) will call that city Ungvar or Uzhhorod but not Uzhgorod. Why? Even though Ужгород is spelt the same in Russian and Ukrainian, Ukrainians will say Uzhhorod while Russians will have it transliterated as Uzhgorod(г in Ukr. is not equal to г in Russian), and typically pronounce it as Uzhgarad(in Russian, letter o not under stress usually becomes a in speech). To answer a possible question what for the Soviets needed an English transliteration, I'll say it is a border town, and subject to foreigners being in it. Maybe in this case they wanted to show that even Soviet Union accept English as the international language
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Old July 30th, 2016, 02:03 AM   #995
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Is this also a Soviet sign? If so, they should change it. But it doesn't look so old to me.
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Old July 30th, 2016, 10:27 AM   #996
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Is this also a Soviet sign? If so, they should change it. But it doesn't look so old to me.
It's Euro 2012 sign, and it has a mistake, I think. Or they maybe didn't want to have two "h" letters nearby(a likelier occurrence), which seems logical even to me unless I knew it's a wrong transliteration. For sure it's not Soviet.
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Old July 30th, 2016, 10:52 AM   #997
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BTW, you showed me a nearby foreign city sign:
Here in Uzhhorod(or Uzhgorod, here it shows the latter).
I also have a few other signs to show:
One more in Uzhhorod: here.
In Krościenko, PK, PL: 3 km from border
In Szypliszki, PD, PL:
8 km from border
In Lithuania
One more
Again to Karaliaucius
And last: Road to Lublin through Zhowkwa/Żółkiew
Now to Liublin
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Last edited by ukraroad; July 30th, 2016 at 11:03 AM.
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Old July 30th, 2016, 11:34 AM   #998
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Bratyslava. And Liublin looks like Liubliana (Spanish for Ljubljana) and starts the same in Cyrillic.
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Old July 30th, 2016, 06:00 PM   #999
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https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@54.29...8i6656!6m1!1e1

Sligo seen from Northern Ireland
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Old July 30th, 2016, 08:50 PM   #1000
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
Strange, considering that SK and UA are neighbouring countries. Did they just signposted 'Ukraine', before?
Yes, exactly. And it was only close to the border crossings. Slovak municipalities, small though, was used instead (Vyšné Nemecké, Ubľa).

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Originally Posted by g.spinoza View Post
Maybe you wanted to say "Roman" transliteration?
No, no. Roman would be Užhorod. This Uzhhorod is English name of the city.

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Originally Posted by Verso View Post
Is this also a Soviet sign? If so, they should change it. But it doesn't look so old to me.
I do not think this is a proper translation. Looks like a Roman transliteration used for English speaking people to learn how to pronounce it.
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