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Old June 19th, 2011, 03:30 AM   #1
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MISC | Urban ropeways / Cable propelled transit / Aerial trams in the city

Urban ropeways / Cable propelled transit / Aerial trams in the city ( different titles of the same content) have a future (they are electric vehicles too).
Intra-urban gondolas can solve many traffic problems and transport problems, especially in the developing world. Renewable energy can be used for sustainable transport, CO2 emissions will be avoided, exhaust emissions are significantly reduced in the streets and at the same time increasing the quality of life of urban residents.

Detachable ropeways / gondolas detachable as an intra-urban traffic system on plain are sporadic used, most times built on the occasion of an exhibition. Exceptional cases are
o Medellin (Republic of Colombia),
o Caracas (Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela,
o Rio de Janeiro ( Federative Republic of Brazil, ropeway currently under construction ),
o the town Tschiatura (Republic of Georgia, Western Asia)
o at the People's Democratic Republic of Algeria,
o at China (People’s Republik of China),
o at Taiwan (Republic of China).

Have a look to this interesting TV-report about Metro-Cable de Medellín
http://www.dw-world.de/dw/0,,14038,00.html
(available in English language, en lengua Español , en Portogues língua , in Deutscher Sprache, in Arabic language, in Chinese Mandarin language)

The MetroCable of Caracas:
http://www.brillembourg-klumpner.arch.ethz.ch/index.php?/films/metrocable-of-san-agustin/

The e-magazine ‘Cities for mobility’, page 10-12m pdf, 3.5 MB
http://www.cities-for-mobility.net/index.php?option=com_docman&task=doc_download&gid=35&Itemid=44m



There are two excellent websites about this topics:
http://gondolaproject.com/365-days-of-cable/ (English language)

and
http://www.abcde-institute.org/urban_ropeways.html
(English language / Deutsche Sprache)

(and the websites of the manufacturer)
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Old June 20th, 2011, 12:34 AM   #2
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About urban ropeways:

Source: Bruff, 15 June 2010 at 13:26 reply at
http://www.thetransportpolitic.com/2...mute/#comments
reply to
http://www.thetransportpolitic.com/2...daily-commute/

"Close your eyes and try to imagine a transit technology

•that was ultra safe (safest of all transit, safer even than commercial air travel);
•ultra reliable (most reliable of all transit);
•ultra-cheap to install (cheapest of all transit);
•didn’t disrupt surface traffic or local businesses during construction);
•ultra quick to install (1/3rd the time of any other transit);
•ultra-cheap to install (1/3rd the cost of streetcar or LRT),
•ultra cheap to operate (no drivers, no high maintenance);
•totally green (all electric);
•completely automated (one ‘driver’ could run 20 vehicles);
•had one engine/drive train (for those 200 vehicles);
•was handicap friendly;
•had no wear and tear on roads or other infrastructure;
•was the fastest of all transit modes;
•was unaffected by congestion;
•was virtually silent (noise footprint indiscernible over ambient street sounds;
•had a geographical footprint that required but 1/5000th of a typical roadway;
•was ‘mug-proof’ (who’s going to try to assault someone locked in a vehicle with a close-circuit camera watching the whole time – and a cop waiting at the next station?);
•served to reduce crime in high-crime neighborhoods; had intermediate station stops;
•had the switching capability of any railroad – and in a fraction of the space;
•had a longevity measurable in decades;
•could also handle curves, even 90 degree bends;
•was stackable (multiple lines in same corridor – one aside the other and/or above the other);
•stations could be integrated into existing buildings;
•could leap not just tall buildings in a single bound, but entire blocks, interstate roadways, even raging rivers and deep chasms, even scale the steepest cliffs). If the need arose, because it was essentially an erector set, the whole kit and caboodle could be unbolted and hauled off in a matter of days.
•Perhaps best of all, it had such an incredible view, people would flock from far and wide just for the ride.

Now open your eyes. (...) In fact, it is the least invasive (disruptive) of any transit technology. Period. "
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Old June 23rd, 2011, 12:54 AM   #3
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Pictures of the MetroCable der Medellin:

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1028495
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Old June 23rd, 2011, 01:33 AM   #4
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nice thread... From my understanding, there are a lot of this systems around the world but mainly for tourism purposes; that's why I find the Metrocable (Medellín) and the Caraca's system exceptional cases.

thanks for the info.
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Old June 23rd, 2011, 02:42 AM   #5
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If you don't have a transportation system (at favelas or slums),
or if you have to transport passengers up to hills,
or if you want to cross a river, but a bridge is to expensive,
or you must damage too much houses, building a new road,
or if you have car jams (and the buses inside),
or if you want a transportation system, cheaper than subway or light rail,
or if you want a transportation system where the costs has been amortized within one year,
or you want to save CO2-emissions at car traffic and you want to trade CO2-allowances,

then take an urban ropeway.

(best of all is a mix of different public transportation, but urban ropeways obtains a greater proportion of it).

For 500.000.000,- Euro, you get about 1 km subway, or about 20 km lightrail or about 70 km ropeways ( 70 km = for instance a chessboard-network of 5 x 5 lines, up to 25 stations with a distance of 700 m at a square of 2,8 x 2,8 km (but this is a thought experiment and a rough estimate on a basis of few stations, 25 stations are substantial more expensive)

The subway drives faster, yes, but you don't have such a long footway to the ropeway like to the subway entry point and this ropeway-network has also a big capacity and the inhabitants are better supplied, 20 hours x 7 days a week, every 11 seconds a gondola (or less in the evening and night)

Why not?

Last edited by networker; June 24th, 2011 at 01:33 AM.
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Old June 23rd, 2011, 09:39 AM   #6
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Please visit the Brazil Urban Transport thread for info on many cable cars and aerial tramways! Link is below in my signature.

here is a vid on the new Alemao Aerial Tramway in Rio
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k7SloK5w6R4
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Old June 23rd, 2011, 04:26 PM   #7
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Samsun Turkey

Ankara Turkey

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Old June 23rd, 2011, 09:13 PM   #8
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Portland and New York have ones which meet the strictest definition of an urban aerial tram in the US.

Other cities in the US that have them in parks which are within the city or metropolitan area would be El Paso, Albuquerque, and Palm Springs. These all go up mountains.

Last edited by zaphod; June 23rd, 2011 at 09:28 PM.
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Old June 24th, 2011, 01:12 AM   #9
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Nice pictures. But most of them look like ropeways across amusement parks or built for tourists or up to hills inside an urban area.

The topic, I started, is about URBAN ropeways, means of mass transportation, public transportation, for example transporting commuters on route to the office not people on route to an interesting sight.

Last edited by networker; June 24th, 2011 at 05:04 PM.
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Old June 25th, 2011, 07:30 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by networker View Post
Pictures of the MetroCable der Medellin:

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1028495
Barcelona has a very similar looking one going from a metro station up to the Montjuïc peak:


Source: http://mic-ro.com/metro/phototour.html?city=Barcelona
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Old June 26th, 2011, 08:38 AM   #11
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Identical to the Rio de Janeiro "Alemão" system
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Old June 26th, 2011, 04:06 PM   #12
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Not quite identical to the Rio de Janeiro "Alemão" system. There is a difference.

Montjuic is a panoramic hill and recreational area at Barcelona, the ground station is at the metro. Complexo Alemao (Rio de Janeiro) is a residental area and MORE residents are using the ropeway to drive to the metro.

But all gondolas around the world are similar looking.
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Old June 27th, 2011, 11:33 AM   #13
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The only "urban ropeway" in Australia that I can think of is the Sky Safari at Taronga Zoo, in Sydney.
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Old June 27th, 2011, 08:11 PM   #14
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Here are some examples of cable cars from romanian cities, all used for tourism:

In Mamaia resort wich belongs to Constanta. It serves the purpose of entertaining tourist, nothing more
http://www.panoramio.com/photo/4149307

http://www.panoramio.com/photo/4149423


In Piatra Neamţ city. It serves for tourists to climb the Cozla hill, for see the city
http://www.panoramio.com/photo/8269757


In Deva city. This serves Deva citadel
http://www.panoramio.com/photo/1360572

http://www.panoramio.com/photo/2737812

http://www.panoramio.com/photo/20127485


In Brasov city, on Tâmpa hill
http://tramclub.org/viewtopic.php?t=...c269e3eddf337c
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Old June 28th, 2011, 04:11 PM   #15
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Cable Car Leading Directly to the Center of Manizales (opened 2009)

With half a million inhabitants, the city of Manizales is the capital of the Colombian province of Caldas. It was founded in 1848 and was rebuilt as a modern city after a disastrous fire in 1925. Situated at an elevation of 2,160 meters (7,087 feet), it is located in the heart of Colombia’s main coffee-growing region. It is nestled in the steep mountain landscape, and thus roads with grades of 25% are not at all a rarity. For that reason, cableways have for decades been a favorite means of transportation in and around Manizales, whether for passengers or for the transport of coffee. In any case, cableway systems extend for a total of around 110 kilometers (around seventy miles) in this area.
The eight-seat “Manizales” cable car is completely connected with the public transit network and also integrated within the ticket system. The lower station of the “Los Cambulas” cable car was built at the entrance to the city along with a new bus station. From there, the route runs through a densely inhabited residential area to the “La Fuente” middle station and then directly on to the city center, in which the “Los Fundadores” upper station was built. In this way, passengers can cover the more than two kilometer (mile and a quarter) distance with the new lift daily from 6:00 A.M. to 10:00 P.M. Comfortable riding pleasure is provided by the forty-two Diamond cars from Sigma, which offer room for six passengers and are equipped with a light, radio, and a ventilation system.

Source:
http://en.leitner-technologies.com/H...ales-Kolumbien

A second ten-seat cable car (gondola) line opened 2011.

See also:
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=537501
(51 pages in Spanish language, but some nice pictures and a map at #306 )

Last edited by networker; June 29th, 2011 at 01:05 AM.
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Old June 28th, 2011, 05:11 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diego Sánchez View Post
From my understanding, there are a lot of this systems around the world but mainly for tourism purposes; that's why I find the Metrocable (Medellín) and the Caraca's system exceptional cases.
don't forget the oldest one used for mass transit: the New York Roosevelt Island aerial tram
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Old June 28th, 2011, 06:24 PM   #17
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What are the technical differences, if any, between an aerial tramway and a cable car?
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Old June 28th, 2011, 11:52 PM   #18
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Quote:
What are the technical differences, if any, between an aerial tramway and a cable car?
You say "Cable car" at the English language of United Kingdom, and "Aerial Tram(way)" at the English language of USA and Canada, traditional spelling, but incorrect, because cable cars are driving at ground level on rails (detachable ones are called "cable cars" like the street vehicles of San Francisco and "funiculars" have cabins fixed on the rope, most of them drive up to a hill and a second cabin down) and all aerial ropeways driving "through the air". An "Aerial Tram(way)" is also an old name for "Reversible Ropeways" (one fixed aerial gondola drives up to the hill and one fixed aerial gondola drives down from the hill). And cables are used for electricity and ropes for gondolas. It is very confusing, I know.

A good description about the different types of gondolas/ropeways you find here:
http://www.doppelmayr.com/en/doppelm...ml?country=all
at the topic "product overview".

And quick informations about transport capacity, line speed and cabin capacity of these different types you find here:
http://en.leitner-lifts.com/Products

Examples of "urban ropeways and funiculars" (and touristical ropeways) you find here:
http://www.poma.net/en/urban.html

Last edited by networker; July 19th, 2011 at 03:28 AM.
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Old June 29th, 2011, 12:25 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luli Pop View Post
don't forget the oldest one used for mass transit: the New York Roosevelt Island aerial tram
I'am sorry, not quite correct.
The first aerial ropeway in a town/city was built
1929 at Barcelona (with a fabulous view to the World Exhibition)
or 1934 at Grenoble up to a hill inside the urban area
or 1974 at Kiel, Germany, across the harbour, from a commercial centre to its car park.
It is not so easy to define, what is an "urban" aerial ropeway.

Roosevelt Island Aerial Tram at New York started 1976.

Last edited by networker; June 29th, 2011 at 01:06 AM.
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Old July 10th, 2011, 11:04 PM   #20
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Colombia Slum Inspire a Mass Cable Car System in Brazil

From Nasdaq.com

Have a look at
http://www.nasdaq.com/aspx/stock-mar...stem-in-brazil
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