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Old June 21st, 2011, 08:50 AM   #21
Aphelion
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Originally Posted by julesstoop View Post
200 / 50 = 4
Thanks, I must have been tired yesterday.
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Old June 21st, 2011, 09:19 AM   #22
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I've done some research and... in Romania the situation is like this:

A1 Bucharest - Pitesti (111 km): 16 exits (average: 6.9 km)
A1 Sibiu bypass (17 km): 5 exits (average: 3.4 km)
A2 Bucharest - Cernavodă (153 km): 6 exits (average: 25.5 km)
A3 Gilău - Câmpia Turzii (52 km): 3 exits (average: 17.3 km)
Total: 333 km, 30 exits, average: 11.1 km

Now is u/c A1 motorway Arad - Timisoara, with 32 km between 2 exits (there is one planned in the middle, but it won't be build now) and Arad bypass (12.7 km and 4 exits - average: 3.1 km).
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Old June 21st, 2011, 12:35 PM   #23
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In Sweden, at least for the two longest motorways:

E4 Helsingborg - Gävle (720 km): 139 exits (average: 5,2 km)
E6 Vellinge - Rabbalshede (411 km): 97 exits (average: 4,2 km)
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Old June 21st, 2011, 01:16 PM   #24
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In Italy, not counting raccordi, tangenziali ecc, but only autostrade proper, there are 632 exits for 6027 km --> 1 exit every 9.5 km.

As for longest routes:
A1; 761 km , 61 exits
A14; 743 km, 63 exits
A4; 522 km, 68 exits
A3; 495 km, 71 exits

number of exits seems inversely proportional to length
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Old June 21st, 2011, 01:53 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by g.spinoza View Post
In Italy, not counting raccordi, tangenziali ecc, but only autostrade proper, there are 632 exits for 6027 km --> 1 exit every 9.5 km.

As for longest routes:
A1; 761 km , 61 exits
A14; 743 km, 63 exits
A4; 522 km, 68 exits
A3; 495 km, 71 exits

number of exits seems inversely proportional to length
Two interesting, contrasting cases:

For its wholelength, A14 (Bologna-Taranto) is closely followed by a national route, in some cases (between Andria and Bari) by not just one one, but two 2x2 expressways in parallel alignments. This is not a merely rural route, but one that in the 1920 and 1930, and later in the 1950s, was modernized, including many early bypasses of most old towns and so on. A14 also doesn't act as a vital part of mobility of any specific city (after Bologna gained its "tangenziale").

On the other hands, A3 follows a different logic. It is the main urban connector between Napoli and Salerno, including being the route of choice for evacuation of Mt. Vesuvius slopes in case of eruption (= more exits). Then it follows down south without a (relatively) wide national road counterpart for many of its sectors. As its alignment goes over the hilly plateaus in the center of the region, there are many small, twisting mountain roads that intersect way. Back in the the day of its original construction the government had decided opening many more road exists would be the way to improve economy, so in those "unaccompained sectors" you get more exists on those intersections with rural mountain roads.
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Old June 21st, 2011, 03:14 PM   #26
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Exit density Denmark

According to the Vejdirektoratet website www.vd.dk, as of 1st January 2011 Denmark had 1122 km motorways and a total of 224 exits. That is an exit density of 5,0 exits/km of motorway. That excludes motorway junctions between 2 motorways, of which there was 20. Including motorway junctions it gives a density of 4,6 km between each exit/junction.
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Old June 21st, 2011, 06:09 PM   #27
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Those 225 exits, are those 225 exit-sliproads, or 225 junctions ?
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Old June 21st, 2011, 09:01 PM   #28
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Just done a quick calculation for the longest continuous freeway in South Africa, the section of the N3 between the centre of Durban and exit 246 outside Ladysmith: 246km with 45 exits (including those at the start and finish and the interchange with the N2) making an average of 5.5km.

However the first 5km in Durban has 5 exits and the last 100km after Mooi River has only 8 exits.
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Old June 21st, 2011, 10:03 PM   #29
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You know there are a lot of exits when they get so close the ramps have to be braided so they all fit.
http://www.youtube.com/user/Freewayj.../1/Hqshhn9r8WU


Quote:
btw: what a weird, weird name of a city is Kissimmee. I keep wondering how it is pronounced.
Kiss-imh-eee

I only know because I stayed their once. US 192 is where all the cheap motels adjacent to Disney World are located and where my family would stay on vacation in Florida. If you keep driving on it you end up in the old town of Kissimmee, which has a little downtown and an active Amtrak station.
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Old June 21st, 2011, 10:36 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
btw: what a weird, weird name of a city is Kissimmee. I keep wondering how it is pronounced.
Kiss- SIH- mee. Accent on the second syllable.

Also, in case anyone was wondering, the local pronunciation of Havre de Grace, Maryland (I-95 at Susquehanna River) is "Haver de Grass", like the stuff that grows on your lawn.
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Old June 22nd, 2011, 04:09 AM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanielFigFoz View Post
The exit density in the UK is pretty low, as is the exit density in Portugal. As an exception my local A14 in Portugal has a large exit density between Figueira and Montemor, but other than that the exit density is only quite high in Lisbon and in Porto, the rest is quite like the UK.
Do you know what is the longest distance between the exits in the UK?
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Old June 22nd, 2011, 11:30 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aswnl View Post
Those 225 exits, are those 225 exit-sliproads, or 225 junctions ?
It is 225 junction between a motorway and the remaining road network, Each junction can include a number of exit-sliproads
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Old June 22nd, 2011, 04:45 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank IBC View Post
Kiss- SIH- mee. Accent on the second syllable.

Also, in case anyone was wondering, the local pronunciation of Havre de Grace, Maryland (I-95 at Susquehanna River) is "Haver de Grass", like the stuff that grows on your lawn.
We're off topic, but I'm never sure whether to pronounce it "Have-er de Grass" - with the As sounding like the A in "cat" - or "Hahv-er de Grahs" - with the A in "father." I think I've heard both. Wikipedia gives "Have-er" - with the A in "cat" - "de Grace" - "Grace" pronounced the American/English way. I think it's mistaken, though. This country - English in general, really - needs a good dictionary of proper names. (Like the "Petit Robert des noms propres" in French.) Doesn't have one, that I know of.

Ahem. Sorry to go off topic. Lame attempt to get back ON topic: Havre de Grace, however you pronounce it, is at exit 89 on I-95. The exits from the Baltimore Beltway to the Delaware line (numbers indicate mileage from either the Maryland/DC or the DC/Virginia line - I've never known, but they're about 200 feet apart on the same bridge, so it doesn't really matter) are 64, 67, 74, 77, 80, 85, 89, 93, 100 and 109. There are very few places I can do that from memory.
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Last edited by Penn's Woods; June 22nd, 2011 at 04:52 PM.
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Old June 22nd, 2011, 05:11 PM   #34
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Does anyone have a current, reliable, above-Wikipedia source of which states use sequentially numbered exits and which use distance (mile)-based numbering?
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Old June 22nd, 2011, 09:08 PM   #35
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I calculated the denisty for Metro Detroit(Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties) I counted exits even if only one direction had exit figuring these would even out. For the state as whole longest distance between exits I could find was on I-75 at 12 miles in Northern Michigan. I'd guess we have average exit every 3 miles higher if you exclude the high desnity in cities.

M-10 19 mi, 29 exits
M-39 16 mi, 14 exits
I-96 40 mi, 42 exits
I-75 80 mi, 56 exits
I-94 57 mi, 52 exits
I-275 27 mi, 14 exits
I-696 28 mi, 22 exits

267 mi, 227 exits= 1.1 per mile
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Old June 23rd, 2011, 03:59 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geogregor View Post
Do you know what is the longest distance between the exits in the UK?
29km, there are motorway-to-motorway junctions in that though, basically if you enter the M20 at the last junction before the M26 and you go down the M26 and obviously onto the M25 you have no opportunity to leave for 29km
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Old June 23rd, 2011, 04:41 AM   #37
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Originally Posted by Frank IBC View Post
Also, in case anyone was wondering, the local pronunciation of Havre de Grace, Maryland (I-95 at Susquehanna River) is "Haver de Grass", like the stuff that grows on your lawn.
Wah? I always thought it was Hov da Gross, which is how I assume the French pronounce it...

So is it "haver", pronounced like "haver", or a thing that "has", (you know, verb indicating possession and all) or "hayver"?
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Old June 23rd, 2011, 05:40 AM   #38
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In Miami, Florida, the exit density on expressways is pretty high.

On State Road 826 (Palmetto Expressway) and I-95, exits are spaced every 1 mile (1.6 km) or less. On State Road 821 (the Homestead Extension of the Florida Turnpike), there is an exit every 2 to 3 miles (3.2 to 4.8 km). On State Road 836 (Dolphin Expressway), there is an exit every 1.5 mile (2.4 km) and on State Road 874 (Don Shula Expressway), there are only two exits: one is 3 miles (4.8 km) from the beginning, the second one is 1 mile (1.6 km) from the first one, and the end is 1 mile (1.6 km) from the second exit.
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Old June 23rd, 2011, 05:57 AM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
In US, the longest closed-access sector on the Interstate System is reported to be 37 miles long, in I-80 between Wendover and Knolls. If you consider all US controlled-access highways, the distinction goes to Fl. Turnpike (47 miles) between exists 193 (Kenansvillle) and 240 (Kissimmee)
Wendover to Knolls, across the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah. I've driven I-80 between Reno and Salt Lake a few times and it's extremely desolate, so this doesn't surprise me. I thought I-80 though Nevada might make the list of the longest exit distances, I'd have guessed maybe 10 miles or more on average between exits, but (excluding Reno) it actually averages only about 5 miles (73 exits over 389 miles per a Wikipedia exit list). The longest stretches are 13 miles once and 11 miles a couple of times.

At the other extreme, some of the exit spacing in US cities is extremely close, with freeways going through the center of most cities. I-395 in Northern Virginia near the Pentagon (coming out of Washington DC) has an incredible 7 exits (6 right and 1 left) over a distance of 0.8 miles/1300m! It's the uppermost roadway in this photo: (screen capture from Google maps)

image hosted on flickr


Downtown Kansas City is interesting too. Here's a description and map from Wikipedia:

The downtown freeway loop, is a complex layout of freeways in downtown Kansas City, Missouri involving 23 exits, four Interstate Highways, four U.S. highways and numerous city streets. Each exit in the freeway loop is numbered 2 and suffixed with every letter of the alphabet except I, O and Z (which would look like 1, 0 and 2 on the exit signs), although some of the exits are currently under construction/renovation and closed to traffic. The entire circumference of the loop is just over four miles (6 km).

image hosted on flickr
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Old June 23rd, 2011, 06:22 AM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
btw: what a weird, weird name of a city is Kissimmee. I keep wondering how it is pronounced.
"ki-SIM-mee."

Or, in IPA, /kɨˈsɪmiː/
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