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Old June 23rd, 2011, 06:35 AM   #1
vachej
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Frank Lloyd Wright and the Skyscraper

I'm interested in making use of, of building on to Frank Lloyd Wrights design principles for tower design.
Ive started a project for a residential tower of around 50 stories consisting of 4 units per floor of
approximately 4000 sq ft. Each unit has 4 bedrooms.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/treehou...57626776152760
http://www.flickr.com/photos/treehou...in/photostream
http://www.flickr.com/photos/treehou...57626776152760
http://www.flickr.com/photos/treehou...7626776152760/

There are two fundamental issues involving modern tower design which I believe modern
architecture fails to give sufficient attention. First, there is
the matter of the design of the units themselves.
Too often they seem to be an afterthought to the design of the tower, the look of the
tower itself taking center stage, and the units being carved out in a kind of makeshift
arrangement. Wright inverts this sequence, first conceiving the individual units
then grouping them in such a way as to create a core. Second there is the matter
of the connection to the street. Modern materials while possessing many amazing
structural characteristics, tend toward imposing a heavy aesthetic burden at street level.
It is proposed that a more traditional urban fabric of highly individual, highly decorative
4 or 5 story masonry buildings be interposed between the street and the tower in order
to mitigate the dystopian effect of huge repetitive masses.

Last edited by vachej; June 23rd, 2011 at 08:11 AM.
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Old June 23rd, 2011, 06:52 PM   #2
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Using Wright design principles for skyscraper design might
generate a floor section such as this:

image hosted on flickr
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Old June 23rd, 2011, 06:55 PM   #3
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Stacked into a building and put into a city the
design might look like this:

image hosted on flickr
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Old June 23rd, 2011, 06:59 PM   #4
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The view from dining room to living room might look like this:
image hosted on flickr
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Old June 23rd, 2011, 07:07 PM   #5
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the view of office, living room, and TV might look like this:
image hosted on flickr
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Old June 23rd, 2011, 08:15 PM   #6
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I think you posted in the wrong section
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Old June 23rd, 2011, 08:19 PM   #7
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genius loci

thanks. could you kindly point out the correct section. i'm a total newbie here
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Old June 24th, 2011, 02:14 AM   #8
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Right. So whats your point?

To be an architect means more than using prefixed "design principels".
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Old June 25th, 2011, 02:54 AM   #9
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the principle of principle

>wunder

if architecture is not based deeply and devotedly to principles
whether 'prefixed' or otherwise, what on earth IS it based on !
in fact is there anything particularly in the aesthetic or artistic
realm that has been a worthy endeavor that has NOT been
based on principle
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Old June 25th, 2011, 03:22 AM   #10
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Of course there can be found a principal or a reason for anything in achitecture/design, otherwise it would be irrational and chaotic.

The point I wanted to express is, that you can't take some rules by someone else (rules that have yet to be expressed here), even if they are Lloyd Wright's, and make a "new" building out of it.

That is a standardized way to generic buildings without any indivisualistic expression.
The western world tried that out excessively from 1945 to 1990 and mostly Asia is still doing so. I'd say that doesn't lead to a pleasurable urban atmosphere we want to live in.

Being an architect means to find your own rules and to stick to them properly - and to find new ones every time, for every building.

However, I still didn't figured out what your point is for this thread.
Maybe I got this wrong and you wanted to express something different?
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Old June 26th, 2011, 05:38 AM   #11
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so the complaint is the failure to first articulate a set of principles prior
to posting drawings which are the product of the application of those
principles. that is what youre objecting to as i understand you
to be saying. but is that really the point ? can't one merely share
his resultant plan, his realized design while only schematically outlining
his motivations and methods ? is the artist really obligated to state in
precise detail exactly the reasoning, the process, to pick out each
step he took, to explain and simultaneously justify it ? surely
it is quite sufficient to let the plans, the perspective, to let the
building speak for itself. in fact a good building will tell you everything
about itself, you can ask why and get all the answers you need from
the building itself
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Old June 26th, 2011, 10:57 PM   #12
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So you want to get comments on the layout itself.

Well you need more than scrappy parts of 3d renderings to fully communicate the many aspects of a buildings.

You can't barely make out what is wich room and how or if a apartment works or not.

My university professors would send me home if I brought them such pictures and said "thats all you need - the building speaks for it self"

Architects all over the world may speak different languages (and god, I think im really struggling with the english one here ) but they also have one other language that
any architect will understand: the standardisized floorplans, cuts, fassade views and plans of side with measurements and so on.
There are very strikt regulations to that and thats for a good reason: floorplans and so on have to be clear and without ambiguousness.

I see a lot of problems in that layout. And a lot of things that are unclear. With further graphics and visualisatons some of these problems could be explained.

And if you say its made after "Wright design principles for skyscraper design" those principles may be a worthy part of that explanations. Don't you think that too?
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Old June 28th, 2011, 03:12 AM   #13
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never mind
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Old June 28th, 2011, 05:57 PM   #14
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image hosted on flickr

Price Tower by Douglas Clifton, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Price Tower by arroyoseccofarm, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Price Tower and Community Center by TylerDog Cards, on Flickr
image hosted on flickr

price tower by orangerobot, on Flickr

I should also post the copy of this tower or "knock off"

Last edited by sweet-d; June 28th, 2011 at 06:10 PM.
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Old June 28th, 2011, 06:06 PM   #15
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bedrooms without windows?
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Old June 29th, 2011, 12:20 AM   #16
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I knew that the two windowless bedrooms were likely to be the first elicitations
of commenter complaints, after of course, the abject generalized attack mounted by our dear contributor wunderknabe Nevertheless I think there is
this to be said. Bedrooms are really for sleeping not looking out the window.
As well, Ive seen for example in period room re-creations at museums the way they
will create a simulated window mimicking daylight. I don't see why you
couldn't make a similar simulated daylight device in a windowless room which you
could connect with a clock such that the light level tracked the position
of the sun in the sky. The point is in a high rise the windows are hermetically
sealed as it is, and in the event of emergency exit is down fire stairs.
This is a technological revolution waiting to happen, a great
liberating transformation much more than the failing the incubus of
habit strickening conventional architectural thinking would tend to suggest
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Old June 29th, 2011, 04:38 AM   #17
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Quote:
Bedrooms are really for sleeping not looking out the window.
You can't be serious with that comment.

Quote:
I don't see why you
couldn't make a similar simulated daylight device in a windowless room which you
could connect with a clock such that the light level tracked the position
of the sun in the sky.
Getting natural light into the rooms (as many of them as posible) is one of the most
important and basic requirements for any building.

The sun's light is one of the most valueable natural sources. Denying it is a
fatal error in designing a building.

If you don't get sunlight into your rooms, better change the floorplans, because
artificial solutions won't make it any better.
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Old June 29th, 2011, 05:47 AM   #18
vachej
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wunderknabe View Post

If you don't get sunlight into your rooms, better change the floorplans, because
artificial solutions won't make it any better.

To the contrary now that I've thought it over I can see all the more the ingenuity in my original assertion. What IS paramount is getting as much sun into just those rooms where people will be living, awake, moving about. The
good design will in fact intensify the allocation of windows to exactly
such rooms for such conditions, while doing the converse for the
converse. Its interesting. One learns quickly in even the most seemingly
marginal of issues, any thinking outside the box, any bringing to bear
of not even novel thought, but thought itself, is so quickly taken to
task by what can only be termed the bureaucratization of the
permissible in architecture, the rigidity of its thought, its stubborn
clinging to received rules that no longer have any meaning, that
no longer advance but rather retard building design. Of course
sunlight is as welcome as flowers in spring. The point is
design always entails compromise, countless compromises, requires
the wisdom to know where to intensify resources and where they
will have to be suppressed.
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Old June 29th, 2011, 09:25 AM   #19
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The Classen

image hosted on flickr

The Classen by Jason B., on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Classy, postmodern, brutalist by rutlo, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Classen apts by DannyMarr67, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

The Classen by cameron_405, on Flickr
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Old June 29th, 2011, 09:30 AM   #20
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I wouldn't want the sun beating on my bedroom window while at the same time I couldn't imagine a bedroom without a window. A room or any secluded space where people tend to live/work needs air circulation. It's common sense. Our bodies need to breathe fresh oxygen that comes from the outside environment. And equally important, the space inside the room needs to air out all the toxic buildup released from our bodies after a long night sleep.
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