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Newcastle Metro Area For Newcastle, N Tyneside, Gateshead, S Tyneside, South Northumberland



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Old September 28th, 2011, 01:20 AM   #41
merleb
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I wonder whether the venerable matrons of Whitley Bay ever noticed the girls attire. Fur dress and no knickers!
What has happened to the main road in Whitley Bay?

Has it now been re-routed BEHIND the Spanish City?
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Old September 28th, 2011, 01:22 AM   #42
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Is the village of Shadforth in Durham in any way linked to Thomas Shadforth?

.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; September 28th, 2011 at 09:43 AM.
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Old September 28th, 2011, 09:33 AM   #43
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What has happened to the main road in Whitley Bay?

Has it now been re-routed BEHIND the Spanish City?
Now a public entertainment space and closed to traffic apart from access to Watts Slope - bogs and cafe.

Yes, new road now built as a bypass goes around to the back of the Dome and cuts through what was The Spanish City Fun Fair.
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Old September 28th, 2011, 09:36 AM   #44
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Originally Posted by merleb View Post
What has happened to the main road in Whitley Bay?

Has it now been re-routed BEHIND the Spanish City?

Yes it has, but there is still quite a bit of work to do in that area.

There is quite a bit of discussion about the why's and wherefore's of this project, on the Whitley Bay-Developments thread . .

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1010659
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Old September 29th, 2011, 03:49 PM   #45
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Gateshead East Cemtery

This was a tour on 8th September 2011 of the Cemetery by Andrea Lang under the title of More Stories Behind the Stones - A walk around Gateshead East Cemetery with a special look at the Non Conformists buried there.

A very interesting walk it was too, especially for me as my knowledge of Gateshead's history is limited. However Gateshead does have its share of influential folk associated with its history and whilst those people may not have grand headstones its clear from the Cemetery that some of the 'ordinary folk' do.

Also interesting to see the widespread numbers of War Graves.

Here are a selection of shots and more can be seen @ http://www.fototime.com/inv/164B008E4F50117





























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Old September 29th, 2011, 06:21 PM   #46
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I liked Geordie Ridley's gravestone, shame about the bird sh... er... lime!
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Old October 2nd, 2011, 04:58 PM   #47
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Tynemouth Pier and Lighthouse

Here are some shots taken from the Pier and Lighthouse - looking towards Whitley Bay and Blyth, across to South Shields and Tynemouth and North Shields.

Not sure if I mentioned this in a previous posting but 'officially' it isn't a Pier, its a Breakwater but we all call it the Pier.

Spanish Battery


St Mary's Island and Blyth Windmills


North Shields 4 Lighthouses


South Shields Lighthouse


Admiral Lord Collingwood and Knotts Flats


Tynemouth Priory and Castle


More shots @ http://www.fototime.com/inv/EE6CBE54EFB4581
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Old October 3rd, 2011, 11:02 AM   #48
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Christ Church - North Shields

This Grade II Listed Building is the replacement for the Parish Church of St Mary that used to stand in Tynemouth Castle. The current Church was built by Robert Trollope and consecrated in 1668.

h Church has been added to over the years with the Tower being added in 1788 and fully restored by John Dodd in 1793.

The Tower contains 10 bells, six dating from 1787.

Intersecting to see that one of the stained glass windows was damaged during Second World War and consequently replaced with a plain glass window.

There is a marvellous stained glass commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Tynemouth Lifeboat Station which was designed by Dr L C Evetts in 1962.

The model ships in the Mariners Chapel date from 1820 and the nautical connection is continued with the organ being housed in a mahogany case including panels from the 1884 Corvette HMS Calliope.

The Parish Stocks, last used in 1832 are also on display in the Church.

This is a description from the Grade Listing, courtesy of The British Listed Building web site @ http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co...urch-tynemouth

Description: Christ Church

Grade: II
Date Listed: 24 October 1950
English Heritage Building ID: 303358

OS Grid Reference: NZ3539368683
OS Grid Coordinates: 435393, 568683
Latitude/Longitude: 55.0115, -1.4481

Location: A192, North Tyneside NE29 0LW

Locality: Tynemouth
Local Authority: North Tyneside
County: Tyne And Wear
Country: England
Postcode: NE29 0LW

TYNEMOUTH PRESTON ROAD (east side)
NZ 3568 NW
North Shields.
11/112
24.10.50 Christ Church
G.V. II

Parish church, 1654-68, finished by Robert Trollop, 1786-88; tower added by John Dodds; 1792-93 extensive rebuilding by John Dodds; 1869 chancel and organ- chamber.

Sandstone ashlar with plinth and rusticated quoins; Welsh slate roof.

West tower; aisled nave with north vestry; apsed chancel with half octagonal north organ chamber, now vestry. Tower has west double door under ornamental fanlight, flanked by large blind roundels and with large roundel above; 2 upper stages have keystoned surrounds to round-headed window, clock, and belfry openings under cornice and battlemented parapet.

Full-height aisles to 3-bay nave have quoined, slightly projecting central bay containing double door with ornamental fanlight under roundel;
side bays have tall round-headed windows under smaller similar gallery windows. Similar windows in returns of aisle, in one-bay chancel and stepped in apse.

Nave has north vestry in domestic style adjacent to central bay of aisle. Hipped roofs to nave, aisles and vestries, except at west nave; roundel to chancel; weather-cock tower finial. Rainwater head dated 1832 in angle of chancel and south aisle may be resited from former smaller chancel.

Interior: plaster walls; flat ceiling with egg-and-dart and Greek key stucco decoration to nave, symbols of Trinity above altar. Elliptical-arched nave arcades on slender columns; cast iron columns to inserted west organ loft.

2 stone grave covers set in floor of east end of nave: Stephen Dockwray, vicar, died 1681 (this partly missing) and members of the Howlett family, died 1683 and 1694. Historical note: built to replace the decayed parish
church in Tynemouth Priory.

Sources: H.E. Craster History of Northumberland vol. VIII 1907, pp 357-369; P.G. Canner and M. Scott 1608-1968 Christ Church North Shields.

Listing NGR: NZ3539368683

Some shots here and more @ http://www.fototime.com/inv/7BFB37AC5809B4B



















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Old October 11th, 2011, 11:51 AM   #49
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Baltic

Whilst open as part of the Heritage Open Days, photograph of the inside of Baltic is not permitted, Therefore photographs were restricted to outside and views from - has to be said it is the best platform for photographs of the Tyne at Newcastle and Gateshead.

BALTIC is a major international centre for contemporary art and is free to enter and was a former Joseph Rank Flour Mill and Silo.



















More photographs @ http://www.fototime.com/inv/AF058E6EF455912
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Old October 19th, 2011, 06:52 PM   #50
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James Renforth - follow up to Steve Ellwood Message #45

Further to Steve's picture of the "new gravestone" to James Renforth located in Gateshead East Cemetery (within his photographs) I was in in the Visitor Centre at Gateshead end of the Tyne Bridge ( former St Marys Church) 19/10/11 and came across this memorial to the said gentleman , located in north wall of the building





I also append pictures of the monument located at the front of the Shipley Art Gallery, Prince Consort Road, Gateshead.

This at one time was located in Gateshead East Cemetery but was relocated a few years ago to its new position - it being more fitting for a son of the town and being "Champion Sculler of the World"






Note the "Public Subscription" to have this erected

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Old October 24th, 2011, 11:48 AM   #51
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St Alban's Church - Earsdon

I visited St Alban's Church on 11th September 2011 as part of the Heritage Open Days and it was the first time I had been inside the building.

This is the third St Alban's Church built in the village of Earsdon in North Tyneside.

The first Church was thought to have been built in the 12th century and the second in the 16th century.

The present Church was built in 1837 and designed by Newcastle Architects John and Benjamin Green (Father and Son).

Further changes to the Church took place in 1890 and 1903.

St Alban was the first English Matyr. In 205 he gave sanctuary to a Priest during the persecutions under the Diocletians Rule. As a consequence he was caught and beheaded and it is said that the executioner could not bring himself to carry out the beheading and he himself was also beheaded.

The Church has some fine stained glass windows dating from 1531 - rare Tudor Glass by Galyon Hone. They originated in Hampton Court and were donated to the Church by the Hastings Family of Seaton Delaval Hall. The window display the Royal Coat of Arms of England (Henry VII and Henry VIII) and of France.

The Church also holds the remains of many Hartley Pit Disaster victims and there is a memorial in the Church Yard.

















More photographs @ http://www.fototime.com/inv/39E919F81F3A510
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Old October 24th, 2011, 01:47 PM   #52
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St Andrews Church - Newgate Street

This was a visit made to St Andrews on 9th September 2011 during the Heritage Open Days.

Considered to the oldest Church in Newcastle Upon Tyne with the present building having been commenced in 1150 and there is even conjecture that an earlier Saxon Church stood on the site.

The Church stands on the corner of Darn Crook (St Andrews Street) and Newgate Street and its Church Yard contains a substantial stretch of the former City Walls.

Getting back to the claim the Church has Saxon roots. Certainly in the pamphlet book "A Guide to the Anglican Churches In Newcastle and Northumberland", edited by Stanley Prins and Roger Massingberd-Mundy it is claimed the Church was Consecrated 'probably' in the 10th Century.

I have a guide book for the Church dating from 1961 and it has this to be say about the Saxon claim:

'The late Mr H L Honeyman advanced the theory that there was a building on the site before the 1150 date, a smaller Church built by the Monks from Hexham during Saxon times. The only tangible evidence supporting this claim is a child's tomb stone which is considered of Pre-Conquest date and which was found in the South Transept in 1844.'

One thing that took my eye during this visit were the three stone cannon balls that were discovered when construction work was being carried out in 1960. The cannon balls date from the Civil War when Newcastle was besieged in 1644 and a cannon was located on the tower of the Church.



















More photographs @ http://www.fototime.com/inv/85FEEE31DD9424B
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Old October 24th, 2011, 04:25 PM   #53
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St Andrews Church - Story of the Bells

During a recent visit to St Andrews Church in Newgate Street during the Heritage Open Days I was advised by the guide that the Church bells contain a leg. Suffice to say not a human leg but the pause after the guides piece of information was meant to enlist that thought!

After the 1644 Siege of Newcastle, the Church tower was heavily damaged owing to it being used as an emplacement for a cannon. The Scots bombarded the Church to try and destroy the cannon. Such was the damage that the tower wasn't repaired until 1726. As part of the repairs it was decided to renew the bells and the Corporation donated £50 towards the cost. However even with this contribution and the metal from the existing bells it was not enough to manufacture the required replacement bells.

However it was fortuitous the a bronze statue of King James II which in 1688 had recently been recovered from the Tyne. It had been thrown into the Tyne in 1688 during a riot in Sandhill. The leg of the statue was donated to St Andrews to make up he weight of brass that they required for their new bells.

Ironically, when the new bells were installed they were too heavy and caused the tower to stress. Consequently after a hundred years it was decided not to ring the bells and they weren't sounded again for a hundred and twenty five years until another new set were installed in 1966.

Eneas Mackenzie's makes this observation in his book, 'Historical Account of Newcastle-upon-Tyne: Including the Borough of Gateshead'.

A little before the revolution, a statue of king James II. on horseback, was erected on the south side of the bull-ring, and opposite to the court stairs, upon the Sandhill. It was cast in copper, of the size of the famous equestrian statue of Charles I. at Charing Cross, and stood upon a white marble pedestal, which was protected by iron rails. This noble monument was the work of Mr. William Larson, was approved of by Sir Christopher Wren, and, according to Bourne, cost the town £1700, though the contract price was only £800. In November, 1688, when the town received the Lord Lumley, and declared for the Prince of Orange, "a few soldiers, as drunk with loyalty as with liquor, assisted by the busy, hot-headed genius of Sandgate, having provided ropes for that purpose, pulled it down, dragged it from thence to the Key, and threw it into the river." This statue was afterwards cast into a set of bells, as we find by the following extract from the common council books:—"April 1st, 1695, All Saints' parish humbly request the metal of the statue (of James II. on Sandhill) towards the repair of their bells." St. Andrew's parish made a similar request. "Ordered, That All Saints' have the metal belonging to the horse of the said statue, except a leg thereof, which must go towards the casting of a new bell for St. Andrew's parish." A print of this statue was published, price 5s. at Newcastle, December 1, 1742, by Joseph Barber, music and copperplate printer. In his proposals, he says it was done from a drawing in the possession of Sir Hans Sloane, Bart.



INSCRIPTION UPON THE PEDESTAL.
JAMES the II.
By the Grace of God.
of Great Britain.
France and Ireland.
King Defender of the Faith.
Sir Wm Creagh Knight
Mayor.
Samuel Gill Esqr.
Sheriff.
1685.
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