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Old November 1st, 2011, 04:55 PM   #81
Galro
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Quote:
Originally Posted by capricorn2000 View Post
that new development under construction is magnanimously impressive -
the designs are really iconic.
the old section of the city has that unique charms.
Thanks for your comment!


97.Close by the apartment complex the previous page, you will find this detached old apartment building among many other things. It was built in 1898 with a design by Norwegian architect Kristen Rivertz in art nouveau style. All the white patches on the facade is clad in marble.



98.



99. Detail along the roof.



100. The marble.



101.



102. Even the cone shaped roof is clad with marble.



103. The balconies.
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Old November 3rd, 2011, 07:56 PM   #82
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More from same area.

104.



105.



106.




107.




108.
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Old November 3rd, 2011, 08:10 PM   #83
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... And a couple of pictures of the colorful streetscape at the east side of the city.

109.



110.



111.
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Old November 3rd, 2011, 08:43 PM   #84
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A charming city! And the new developments look exciting. It will be fun to watch them go up.
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Old November 28th, 2011, 07:11 PM   #85
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Taken with another camera:

106. Built in 1900, architect Sigurd Gulbransen.
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107.
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108.
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109.
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110.
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111. Looking down Thomas Heftyes Gate with the pictured buildings on the left side.
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Edit: I realize now that I have already shown a couple of pictures of these buildings, but these are of better quality and shows more so I think it's worth showing them still.
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Old November 28th, 2011, 08:52 PM   #86
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A very elegant cityscape.
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Old December 15th, 2011, 08:20 PM   #87
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Thanks. Some pictures from today (can't say I'm completely happy with the quality though).

I think this is quite an cool building. The thin side reminds of the many thin 19th highrises you will find in most older American cities. It was built in 1899 with a gothic inspired design by architect Carl Christian August Michalsen. The Standard shop has been in the building since 1900 and is currently the owner of the building.

112.
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113.
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114.
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115
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116
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Old December 15th, 2011, 09:10 PM   #88
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Those oriel style windows are a lovely feature.
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Old December 15th, 2011, 11:46 PM   #89
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Quote:
Originally Posted by openlyJane View Post
Those oriel style windows are a lovely feature.
Thanks. I guess you are referring to the oriel chambers in Liverpool, right? It wouldn't surprise me if our building was inspired by yours. The architects working in Oslo at time was known for borrowing styling clues from foreign architects/styles/buildings.

I think this have given the city a very exciting mix of architecture though.
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Old December 16th, 2011, 12:11 AM   #90
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Of course, oriel style windows have been around for a long time. Though I wasn't specifically thinking of Oriel chambers in Liverpool - you are right that its windows are pretty special: they were the first ever metal framed windows.
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Old December 16th, 2011, 12:32 AM   #91
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I have to be completely honest and say that I didn't knew that the windows themself were called "oriel style" but it does at least explain where the Oriel chamber got its name from.
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Old December 16th, 2011, 12:59 AM   #92
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First of all - a nice thread, Galro!

Quote:
Originally Posted by suer View Post
I have visited Oslo this September again and stayed in a hotel in the strict city centre. I must say, unlike the other parts of the city, Oslo's city centre is quite depressive. There are many beggars and junkies on the streets whole day long.
Your post needs a thorough explanation given. I will try to give a good answer to your points. First of all, I can agree there exists some parts of the city centre that are a bit depressive. I am not going to try and deny that. But this is ESPECIALLY valid if you go in fall and winter times. In both fall and winter, at many times, Oslo has grey weather, is quite empty, and then it of course increases the negative feeling. So come in summertime next time, the only time anyone should visit Oslo to be honest! When it comes to junkies, the situation was even worse just a couple of years ago, and in large parts of the 90s and early 2000s it was basically a horrible situation. The main hangout for the junkies very close by the central station however has been cleaned out quite a bit, just less than a year ago, and what you are seeing now is mostly the remains and "leftovers" of that. The situation today is better than it used to be and it will improve even further, once the new areas get even more finished, I am sure. Note that I'm talking strictly the junkies here.

Because it's a different situation with two other things - 1. the beggars. These are a majority eastern europeans and gypsies these last few years (some few Norwegian homeless/junkies/ex-junkies also). They increased rapidly only a year or two after Norway joined Schengen. And 2. then we have a big problem for a few years with - very often - African sellers of hashish/marihuana and sometimes other illegal substances (often cocaine but even other stuff sometimes). Many of these are limited time asylum seekers, in some cases coming only to sell this stuff for a shorter period. These are in several cases people exploiting asylum system to do criminal activities. Some are also people who have gotten permanent residence in Norway, Somalis, etc. though. This started increasing only about 4 years or so ago. They took over a market that previously consisted of all sorts of persons around certain areas of city centre.

What you must understand is how "fluid" these problems have been, it has been changing quite a lot over the last 10 or so years. And at least in the VERY city centre, I think we will be able to remove at least most of the problem over the next 5 to 7 years.


Quote:
Originally Posted by suer View Post
Also buildings are in poor shape many of them being deserted with windows broken or covered. Same concerns streets, pavements and small architecture.
I really don't understand totally what you mean by this, and what areas you have been walking around in. Maybe you walked around the areas that were hit by a BIG bomb the 22nd of July this year? Because that made it so that a lot of windows were broken and many wooden plates put up instead, etc.

As well I suspect you walked around in the "Kvadraturen" area south of Karl Johan, between that main street and the A. fortress? Then you should know that the area south of Karl Johan (not all of Karl Johan, area closer to the Royal Palace is nicer/outside the "Kvadraturen" area) has been almost a "no-go" zone for local Oslo people since the early 70s or something. It has been abandoned, almost, for long time and only in the last 5 years some serious things have been done to try to bring more life there. I must tell you - Oslo is the type of city that you REALLY need some "local knowledge" to have full enjoyment of, because there can suddenly and unexpectedly be some areas in the middle of the city where local people use it VERY little, while there can even be places a bit outside the downtown that are more used and popular than those places, in the middle of downtown...

If it is one thing I am sort of proud of, about Oslo, it is that there's almost no buildings that are totally "ghettoish" and in poor shape. Of course some exceptions exist, but overall I find Oslo a fairly well-kept city (On the other hand, Oslo is also a bit messy, unplanned and chaotic sometimes - some places could deserve a clean up and try to make it more International metro-ish, to put it like that - and tear down a few worthless shitty old buildings here n' there).

I enjoy Oslo more for how good conditions most places are, than almost any city I've been in in Sweden for instance. No offence to Swedish towns, but I just find it strange that you say this, when for instance most Swedish towns feel kind of "50s" and with a bit tired, old buildings in them, and I always enjoy when I travel back to Oslo from Sweden. Meanwhile you - and I would also say many with you - say you lived in Stockholm (or other Swedish city for other people I have seen), and therefore you find Oslo depressive, ghettoish with poor buildings? (Well Stockholm is the best exception from this rule in Swedish cities and towns, though, as the country invests the most money there to keep things top notch, I believe)

This is a little strange isn't it? I feel I come back to the topnotch town I love with higher quality buildings in many cases (especially in all postwar architecture, in the older architecture I admit Sweden more or less owns us) when I get back to Oslo from Sweden, you feel it's full of abandoned buildings and looks a bit depressive.

Quote:
Originally Posted by suer View Post
In my opinion this is mainly bcs there are actually no people living in the city centre - I even tried to count apartment buildings but could not find more than 5-10. I could not understand how can it be so in so well planned and rich metropolis.
Well for long time, what you said about no people living in the centre, was correct, but this is not true for today. There have been quite a few apartment projects, rebuilding places used for office, etc. the last decade or so and this is not correct. But again, you went here in September and it was probably in a "dead time" for the city when there wasn't so much life around. Oslo has "dead times" (at least less life by locals in the city streets) both sometimes during fall, quite a few times in winter, and even in the vacation time in the height of the summer. So that's probably why it seemed like no apartments there. As I said, this has changed quite a lot from old times - but there still isn't A LOT of apartments though. But it is changing, and has been changing, a lot for the past 5 years.

Quote:
Originally Posted by suer View Post
This also results in not so many stores and restaurants there, of course besides the closest proximity to the Karl Johans gata. In the night most of the streets are dark and empty, especially the quarter from Mynttgata to Karl Johans gata.
Well, you just confirmed my suspicion there. You were walking around in the Kvadraturen area south of Karl Johan . WHY OH WHY do tourists always make this mistake? There should be a rule in every tourist site for Oslo that Kvadraturnen can be skipped more or less until you have seen every other part of the city, first!

There's a hell of a lot of stores in Oslo in many, many other places than the area that is cornered by: 1. City hall 2. Karl Johan 3. The old stock exchange building + the Opera and 4. the Akershus fortress. This area is quite dead at many times and not the most exciting if you are looking for some real city life. I do agree that it is a bit crazy that an area neighbouring the main street is a bit dead, and sometimes even a bit ugly (in some streets). But this is just the way it is. This area does have quite a few nice buildings though, many places. But except for around the area with the "glove-hand-fountain" - and even that only in summer - this whole area is NOT FOR CITYLIFE WITH PLENTY OF PEOPLE AROUND. This you find in Karl Johan, Aker Brygge, Solli Plass, Majorstuen+Frogner, Bislett, St. Hanshaugen, Grünerløkka, Grønland etc. much more than you do in "Kvadraturen."

Here is a map where you can see where the sort-of, slightly, "boring" and even a bit crime-ridden "Kvadraturen" area roughly is:

[IMG]http://i39.************/2euleaf.jpg[/IMG]

The point isn't that Kvadraturen is a total no-go area (although only 10-12 years ago it kind of was - it was even worse than now, back then). But it is NOT the place to go if you are looking for bustling citylife with lots of people. This is simply due to the history of this area, and the history of the city. Which is kind of good to know when you travel somewhere, don't you agree?

Quote:
Originally Posted by suer View Post
Galro, can you provide any background for this situation? Was it always non-living district? If not, when it became such one? Are there any plans to redvelop the city centre and bring residents there?
Kvadraturen has become better and more lively than it used to be. But it still isn't very full of life and activity, in some parts, even in summertime. And you went in a grey fall time, and expect life there?

The downtown of Oslo is very lively in many parts, with one exception, KVADRATUREN. Also, of course Oslo is not AS lively at all times of the year. You went there in a sucky time of year to visit, at least when the weather isn't good. Fall, winter and the two main weeks of summer vacation are either dead, or, in the summertime, a "quiet" time to visit Oslo. In that summer period, sometimes in some areas you see more tourists hanging around than Oslo people, because veeeery many Oslo people travel any chance they get!

That is not necessarily because Oslo sucks I think, but more like we also love to experience new places. And of course if you live in a city like Oslo all your life, yes it might sometimes be a bit boring. However, I have done that, and I still love Oslo, I am proud of it (despite some "warts" and imperfectness, like in more or less any city on earth), I think it has great potential to be a nice city.

You are VERY welcome to visit Oslo in some of the best times to visit: From last half of April to first half of July, and from 1st of August to first half of September (September varies, some years can be a great late summer, OR great early fall - other times can be grey and not so nice). You CAN also visit in the time of summer I excluded, but be aware that maybe 50% or more of the city is on vacation. That time is if you like a bit more peace, quiet and tranquility with your summer.

There are many stores, bars and similar things also in the other parts of inner city besides the very central downtown, so be sure to visit those.
Also, Oslo is a city of many "secret" offers you might not find if you aren't locally familiar and just randomly wander around. The streets CAN be boring by themselves if you just wander around - YOU HAVE TO USE THOSE THINGS THE CITY CAN OFFER if you want to really get to know what is good about Oslo! Oslo is also not a city to visit if you are poor, for that reason...

Try out Illegal Burger, or the fish store with "fish eatery" at the old Opera passage, I can recommend Rice Bowl around the corner from that fish store, for some cheap Thai food with fully good enough quality (good to eat, but not a gourmet restaurant, just a "eat cafe" sort of). In summer, try to chill out at the roof bar Etoile by the Grand Hotel. Also try out the bar on top of SAS hotel right by the Royal palace. There are a lot of fun bars and stuff around Grünerløkka that has to be tried, there you can also find small shops and all that kind of stuff. Some of the same thing around Majorstuen and Frogner, although it's a bit more "upscale" version of it and is a bit more stiff and uptight sometimes. After this, there are some good things to discover around the Grønland ("Greenland") area as well, that is the inner city immigrant district, kind of. You find both bars (Olympen, Oslo mek. Verksted), immigrant restaurants, etc. there.

And much much more... But please my friend, come when the weather is fairly warm and pleasant!

Last edited by dexter26; December 16th, 2011 at 01:38 AM.
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Old December 22nd, 2011, 12:10 AM   #93
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134. Old 19th century apartment building obstructed by threes. The tower to left is a old fire tower.
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135.
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136. With marble inserts beneath the windows.
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137. Cranes are a common feature of the city scape where ever you go in the city now days.
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138.
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Old December 22nd, 2011, 01:02 AM   #94
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You've captured the city real well.
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Old December 22nd, 2011, 02:00 PM   #95
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Thanks
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Old December 22nd, 2011, 02:33 PM   #96
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Thanks for the lovely pics from Oslo...
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Old December 22nd, 2011, 04:32 PM   #97
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Thanks for your comment. You're welcome!
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Old December 24th, 2011, 01:25 AM   #98
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139. A picture of the new developments at Tjuvholmen.
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140. A picture of Homansbyen with Uranienborg church behind it.
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Old December 24th, 2011, 07:31 PM   #99
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Love seeing cities where the historic heritage is well-kept in these corridors!
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Old December 25th, 2011, 02:31 AM   #100
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Thanks for your comment!
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