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Old September 16th, 2011, 04:46 PM   #1
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Treasures of Romania



Treasures unearthed in Romania



Source: Marea Enciclopedie a Dacilor

Last edited by city_of_joy; September 19th, 2011 at 09:08 AM.
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Old September 16th, 2011, 04:47 PM   #2
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Pietroasele Treasure, Romania


The Pietroasele Treasure, nicknamed "The hatching hen and the golden chicken" was found in Pietroasele, Buzău, Romania, in 1837, is a late fourth-century Gothic treasure that included some twenty-two objects of gold, weighing 27 kg, out of which 12 pieces weighing 18,795 kg were recovered. It was the star of the Universal Exhibition in Paris in 1867. It was also exhibited in London (1868) and Vienna (1872). It was the greatest treaure of gold until the discovery of Tutankhamon. Now the greatest part of treasure is seen at The National Museum in Bucharest.


On one of the pieces is the inscription "gutaniowi hailag" which was translated as variants of the formula "the sacred inheritance of Goths".

It is supposed by some historians that the treasure belonged to the Gothic king Athanaric whose center of power was here, in Buzău Mountains and it was buried in an attempt to hide it from the Huns, who had defeated the Gothic Greuthungi north of the Black Sea and began moving down into Dacia around 375.

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Old September 17th, 2011, 08:05 AM   #3
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The Treasure of Nagyszentmiklós, Romania
(Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna)


The Treasure of Nagyszentmiklós (also called the Treasure of Sânnicolau Mare) is a valuable collection of twenty-three early medieval gold vessels, found in 1799 in Nagyszentmiklós, Kingdom of Hungary in the Habsburg Empire (now Sânnicolau Mare in Romania). The treasure was soon transferred to Vienna, the capital of the empire, where it has been ever since. Recently, Romania have issued requests to the Austrian government for its "repatriation".

The treasure, consisting of twenty-three pure gold vessels weighing a total of 10 kg and variously dated from the 6th to the 10th century, was found in 1799 in the vicinity of Sânnicolau Mare. The figure of the "victorious Prince" dragging a prisoner along by his hair, and the mythological scene at the back of the golden jar, as well as the design of other ornamental objects, show close affinities with finds at Novi Pazar, Bulgaria and at Sarkel, Russia. Stylistically, Central Asian, Persian-Sassanid and Byzantine influences are predominant.

Scholars have connected the treasure with the Avar khaganate. The newest researches show direct connections to Avar origin.
According to professor Nykola Mavrodinov (based on Vilhelm Thomsen), the script on vessel number 21 is in Bulgar, written with Greek letters, surrounding a cross, and reads, “Boyl Zoapan made this vessel. Butaul Zoapan intended it for drinking.”
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Old September 18th, 2011, 07:57 PM   #4
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The Dacian Helmet of Coţofeneşti, Romania
(National History Museum Bucharest)

The Golden Helmet of Coţofeneşti is a Geto-Dacian helmet dating from the first half of the 4th century BC. In 1929, a child named Traian Simion uncovered the helmet by chance on the territory of the village of Poiana Coţofeneşti (now called Poiana Vărbilău), Prahova County, Romania.

Almost a kilogram heavy, the gold helmet is very well-preserved, missing only the part of its skull cap. The form of the helmet and its decorations reveal the autochthonous character of this Geto-Dacian artwork. Helmet decorations depict a range of mythical creatures, and an illustration, on either cheek-piece, of a ritual enactment.
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Old September 19th, 2011, 02:35 AM   #5
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one kg = 2.2 lbs, this helmet actually isn't that heavy!
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Old September 19th, 2011, 04:54 AM   #6
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Nice Collection. Great!!!!
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Old September 19th, 2011, 08:23 AM   #7
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Nice thread....nice pics and informative write-ups, thanks.
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Old September 19th, 2011, 03:06 PM   #8
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Thank you guys!

The Treasure of Agighiol
National History Museum Bucharest

Found in 1931 a tomb of a Dacian prince not far form Histria (Dobruja). In the outher chamber were found the skeletons of horses, with the hammered silver plaques of their rich harness. The inner chamber contained the entire silver treasure of the prince himself. One of the vases is inscribed "Cotys", prince's name. The tomb and treasure are from 4th century BCE.
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Old September 20th, 2011, 03:19 PM   #9
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Nice thread!
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Old September 20th, 2011, 03:59 PM   #10
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Thank you!

Treasure of Peretu
National History Museum Bucharest

In 1971 Alexander Tran from the Peretu village, Teleorman county (Southern Romania) discovered in the area called "The Springs" a Thraco-Getic tomb about 2,500 years old. In tomb it was buried a figure of the local aristocracy. The tomb had two chambers: in the first there was a human skeleton surrounded by various items of pottery, iron knives, arrowheads, gilded silver objects, bronze vessels. In the second room it was discovered that the warrior was not buried alone: ​​there were the skeletons of two horses, two hunting dogs, a cow and a car with four iron wheels. Overall more than 50 gold plated silver objects, including a gilded silver helmet about. 750 grams. Most of the pieces are currently exhibited at the National Museum of History.

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Old September 21st, 2011, 04:35 PM   #11
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Treasure of Băiceni
National History Museum Bucharest

Incidentally discovered by locals in 1959 in the village Băiceni, Iasi County, and recovered starting in 1961 by the History Museum of Moldavia. The treasure has a weight of 2.5 kg of precious metal (gold). Composed of a helmet, a bracelet, a belt and a number of brackets.

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Old September 21st, 2011, 04:44 PM   #12
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The Helmet from Iron Gates
Detroit Institute of Arts, USA


The Helmet of Iron Gates is a Geto-Dacian silver helmet dating from the 4th century BC, housed in the Detroit Institute of Arts, USA.

It probably comes from Iron Gates area, in the Mehedinţi County, Romania. Formerly it was in the collection of Franz Tau, Vienna.

The helmet is similar to the Helmet of Coţofeneşti and other three Getian gold or silver helmets discovered so far.


Last edited by city_of_joy; September 21st, 2011 at 05:29 PM.
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Old September 22nd, 2011, 01:28 PM   #13
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The Dacian Bracelets from Sarmisegetusa Regia (remains of Decebalus Treasure)
National History Musem Bucharest

The Classic Dacian period ends when parts of the Dacian State were reduced to a Roman province by the Roman Empire under Trajan, partly in order to seize its gold mines. After the Second Dacian War (105–106 AD) Romans had looted 165,000 kilograms (363,762 pounds) of gold and 300,000 kilograms (661,386 pounds) of silver in a single haul, as estimated by modern historians. This amount seems credible in terms of the Dacian exploitation of precious metals in the Apuseni Mountains along with trade payments and tributes from abroad. Its existence in only one spot (at Sarmizegethusa), suggests that there was a central control of precious metal circulation.

According to the majority of historians this sort of monopoly of precious metals, and the Roman's forcible collection of Dacian gold objects, explains the scarcity of archaeological discoveries consisting of golden ornaments for the period between the 3rd century BC – 1st century AD; however, the existence of the "Treasures of Dacian kings" has been confirmed by the latest archaeological finds of large gold spiral-shaped bracelets from Sarmizegetusa. It seems that the Romans did not find the entire royal treasure.

Some two dozen of the gold multi-spiral zoomorphic-headed bracelets were discovered by archaeological looting in different spots in the area of Sarmisegetusa Regia, in the Orăștie Mountains. By 2011, twelve out of the twenty-four looted gold bracelets had been recovered (some with the help of Interpol and FBI) and are housed at the Romanian National History Museum in Bucharest.

These gold bracelets, adorned with leaves and snake heads, weigh around 2.2 pounds (1 kilogram) each.




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Old September 23rd, 2011, 01:37 PM   #14
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The Gepid Treasures from Apahida
National History Museum Bucharest

In the village of Apahida (Cluj county) have been made important archaeological discoveries, including two tombs with treasures belonging to two Gepid princes or kings from 5th century CE. One of the tombs was found in 1889 and consists of a coffin containing the body of a man wearing a ring with the name Omharus inscribed on it. The tomb contained numerous specific Gepidic ornaments. This treasure is now at the History Museum in Budapest.

A second hoard was discovered in 1968, 300 m from the first. This second treasure, much richer than the first, contained the tomb of a man who was identified by existing accessories as another Gepid ruler. The two thesauri have led to the assumption that the area they are leaders of an inhumation cemetery Gepid, hypothesis confirmed by the fact that in 1978 a villager in the area discovered another ornament ornamental chance similar to those found in the first two treasures.

The Gepids first appeared in the Roman World when they accompanied the Goths in an invasion of Dacia in the 260's AD but even after the province was abandoned by Rome, a decade later, they did not take possession of it. They settled, instead, east of the River Tisza where they were subjugated first by the Ostrogoths, then, along with them, by the Huns (in AD 375). The Gepids provided Attila with the largest of all his 'allied' contingents and their king, Ardaric, was the most favoured of all the great Hun's vassals. They proved staunch allies and formed the right wing of the Hunnic army at the Battle of Châlons (or the 'Catalaunian Fields') in 451. But after Attila's death, it was the Gepids, still led by Ardaric, who led the alliance of rebel Germans and Sarmatians, which overthrew Hunnic domination at the Battle of the Nedao in 454. It was this victory which provided the Gepids with a homeland in the eastern Carpathians as allies of Rome.


Last edited by city_of_joy; September 23rd, 2011 at 04:40 PM.
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Old September 24th, 2011, 12:56 PM   #15
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The Tiaras from Galeşu Mare
1000 BCE, National History Museum Bucharest

The two tiaras (a form of crown) from Galeşu Mare (Constanţa county) belonged to some princes from Early Iron Age.
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Old September 24th, 2011, 01:06 PM   #16
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The Hunnic diadem from Gherăseni
Early 5th century CE, County Museum Buzău


The diadem belonged to a Hunnic princess.

In 375 the Huns chased away the Goths from Dacia and from their capital in Buzău Mountains.
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Old September 26th, 2011, 06:41 PM   #17
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The Perșinari Treasure
1600 BCE, National History Museum Bucharest

A number of buried treasures from the Bronze Age testify for the wealth of Carpathian society in this period. A good example is the Perșinari treasure (Dâmbovița county), consisting of eleven gold daggers in graduated weights, one gold sword and another fragmented gold dagger, leading to the suggestion that they represent various denominations of a substitute for money in the days coinage wasn't invented. The pieces are not from pure gold but for electrum (70% gold) and weight 4 kg totally.
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Old September 26th, 2011, 08:08 PM   #18
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Wow, I did not know about most of these. Another great thread. Thanks City.
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Old January 17th, 2012, 08:58 PM   #19
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Gold Treasures from Bronze Age
National History Museum Bucharest





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Old January 17th, 2012, 08:59 PM   #20
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Good thread

Bulgaria and Romania are filled with ancient Treasures
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