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Old June 9th, 2012, 11:17 PM   #81
JD47
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Is the world coming to an end or something. After all it is 2012.
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Old June 11th, 2012, 07:42 PM   #82
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Quote:
Reports of tornado in Co Donegal
Updated: 13:11, Monday, 11 June 2012


Sliabh Sneacht in Buncrana at 11.30am

Met Éireann has been contacted by three people in relation to unconfirmed reports of a tornado in Donegal.

The event was reported to have happened over Sliabh Sneacht in Buncrana at 11.30am.

Met Éireann confirmed that there are heavy and intense thundery showers in the area, and that localised, heavy echoes are showing up on the radar.

It said that tornadoes are possible in these conditions and that it would not be unlikely for there to be more such incidents in the next 24 to 48 hours.

Story from RTÉ News:
http://www.rte.ie/news/2012/0611/donegal.html
Video:

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Old June 11th, 2012, 07:53 PM   #83
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That is weird. Very crazy event but cool to see.
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Old June 20th, 2012, 07:49 AM   #84
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How much ware the temperatures in Juni to August?

Does the weather also switch from sun to rain in this month during a day?

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Old June 21st, 2012, 12:36 PM   #85
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronald34 View Post
How much ware the temperatures in Juni to August?

Does the weather also switch from sun to rain in this month during a day?

Regards
Ronald
Hey Roland

Perhaps you could clarify exactly what you want to know??

In a word YES.....in Ireland we can have 4 seasons in 1 day For example, yesterday I was in the garden sunbathing. It was maybe 25 and sunny. Today its lasting rain and only about 10-12!!

It can be difficult to give firm temperatures for Summer because of the fluctuations in weather like the example I gave above. However, some of the Summer months can also be some of our wettest months due to humidity and the effects of the Ocean. 20-25 would be considered a good Summers day in Ireland with anything over 25 being considered exceptionally warm. The temp rarely rises over 30.

Hope this helps.

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Old June 28th, 2012, 10:03 AM   #86
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Heavy rain causes widespread flooding in parts of Cork and Belfast
Updated: 08:00, Thursday, 28 June 2012



Heavy overnight rain has led to serious flooding in parts of Cork and Belfast.

The worst affected areas in Cork are on the outskirts of the city at Douglas village which is under a metre of water and 3,000 people have no power.

Flooding is severe In Togher, the Kinsale road, the South Ring road, the Viaduct on the south side of the city and at Ballyhooley Road on the north side. There is no access in or out of Clonakilty.

Elsewhere, torrential rain across Northern Ireland has left many places under water with further downpours forecast today.

The worst affected areas are in east and south Belfast, where some roads remain impassable because of flood water, abandoned cars and debris.

An Post has said that that they are experiencing difficulties delivering post nationwide.

The fire service brought in pumps and the environment agency handed out sandbags to home owners.

An Post have advised that all deliveries to Cork city centre and the south side of the city have been delayed.

An Post staff have been unable to get into the sorting office in Togher due to the flooding.

Flooding has also been reported in parts of Counties Sligo and Tipperary. Motorists in Tipperary are being advised that there is surface water on the M8 motorway between junctions 11 and 12.

Met Éireann has said that around 50mm of rain fell last night but in some areas up to 70mm may have fallen.

Forecaster Evelyn Cusack said the rain is continuing to clear northwards and “the worst is over on a widespread nature"

Ms Cusack has said that June 2012 is the wettest on record.

The ESB is operating an emergency helpline for people experiencing problems with electricity. The number is 1850 372 999.

(Send your pictures of today's flooding to yourphotos@rte.ie)

Story from RTÉ News:
http://www.rte.ie/news/2012/0628/hea...-flooding.html
Quote:
28 June 2012 Last updated at 08:37
Belfast floods: Rescue services deal with 700 flood calls

The Fire and Rescue Service has dealt with more than 700 flood-related call-outs in greater Belfast following a series of heavy downpours on Wednesday.

At the height of the flooding, many roads were impassable and about 1,000 homes were left without power.

By 07:00 GMT on Thursday, most of the main roads in east and south Belfast were passable with care.

However, a Met Office amber warning remains in place and there is a risk of further flooding later.

A yellow warning, the lowest level of warning, advises the public to "be aware" of adverse weather conditions, while amber urges people to "be prepared".

The highest level warning, red, means that action should be taken.

The fire service said it had put extra resources in place. However, the service has urged people to avoid ringing the 999 service "unless there is an imminent life risk".

Northern Ireland Water said it received 2,800 calls on Wednesday evening.

Roads affected on Thursday:
  • Stewartstown Road is closed between Dairy Farm and Twinbrook road.
  • A landslide in Lisburn's Brokerstown Road area has reduced traffic to one lane.
  • A manhole cover has lifted in Summerhill Road, Dunmurry, opposite Chestnutt Park.
  • Other roads reduced to one lane in Lisburn include Belsize Road, North Lisburn Feeder Road and Derriaghy Road. Mullaghcarton Road in Lisburn is blocked due to debris and flooding.
  • Roads passable with care in Belfast include: Knock Road; Upper Knockbreda Road/Cregagh Road; Hillhall Road; Stewartstown Road/Twinbrook Road; Castlereagh Road/Loopland Park; Milltown Road/Belvoir Road; Stockmans Lane; Blacks Road under M1 Bridge; Milltown Road / Belvoir Road; Prince William Road/Lisburn North Feeder Road.

Regional Development Minister Danny Kennedy accepted the weather conditions were exceptional but said the "flood line did not perform as it should have performed".

He said there were "serious questions" to be answered.

The Fire and Rescue Service said it had put extra resources in place. However, the service urged people to avoid ringing the 999 service "unless there is an imminent life risk".

SDLP MLA Conal McDevitt said parts of south Belfast had been a "scene of devastation" on Wednesday night.

He said although it was an exceptionally bad night, he criticised both Northern Ireland Water and the Roads Service and said they had been "caught off guard"

"The response was totally inadequate, the call handling facility collapsed," he said.

However, Sara Venning of Northern Ireland Water has defended its response.

"Across Northern Ireland and across Belfast the NI Water infrastructure was operational," she said.

"So this flooding did not occur because of equipment failure, this flooding occurred because of extremes of weather conditions."

A police spokeswoman said motorists should not travel unless absolutely necessary.

She added: "As water continues to subside motorists forced to abandon vehicles last night as a result of flooding can arrange to have them collected."

Belfast City Council has implemented its emergency response plan.

From 09:00 BST on Thursday, it will operate a free phone advice line on 0800 707 6965 for people living in Belfast whose homes have been flooded.

The fire service said that between 19:00 and 22:00 BST on Wednesday it was receiving a call on average every 20 seconds.

Chief Fire Officer Chris Kerr said "My officers are currently deployed at a wide range of emergency incidents involving flooding, and they have rescued and removed a large number of people in difficult conditions."

He added: "Sadly, on arrival at many of these incidents we are finding considerable damage to residential and commercial property, and scenes of public distress.

"I can assure the public that NIFRS have the capacity and resources to sustain our response to what we envisage will be a protracted operation."

The coastguard and RNLI were also enlisted to help out in the operation.

First Minister Peter Robinson said Northern Ireland's infrastructure needed to improve.

"This is soul destroying for the people who have been affected," he said.

"This is the kind of weather we can expect year on year and I think we need to have the kind of infrastructure that's going to deal with it.

"That will require very significant funding. It will require the executive to look at its priorities but I think a very strong case can be made."

BBC Northern Ireland reporter Mervyn Jess said some streets in east Belfast had been "turned into rivers" on Wednesday evening.

"The water has been rolling down in torrents from the Castlereagh hills, coming down the Ballygowan Road to the junction with the Castlereagh Road and the Knock dual carriageway," he said.

"Some parts are basically like a lake."

In Cushendall, County Antrim, the sudden rain saw Mill Street under several inches of water which poured into local shops and businesses.

Restaurant owner Paddy McLaughlin said: '"Just about teatime the heavens opened, the water poured down and inside of about 20 minutes the drains just couldn't take water.

"The whole street outside was flooded - there've been quite a number of businesses affected here in Mill Street."

BBC Northern Ireland
Quote:
Flooding, power cuts reported around Ireland following heavy rainfall


Flooding in the Douglas Village area of Cork city this morning

FLOODING HAS BEEN reported in local areas around the country – with water levels rising so high in parts of Northern Ireland that motorists were forced to abandon their cars last night.

AA Roadwatch has said that Co Cork is the worst-affected area so far following severe rain overnight. It is urging motorists to slow down, increase their braking distance and use dipped headlights to improve visibility.

The suburbs in Cork are affected, with routes impassable in Douglas, Glanmire and Greenmount, as well as flooding reported around Killens on the N20/Mallow Road at Blackpool; the N71/GBandon Road by the Viaduct; the South City Link road by Turner’s Cross; and all aroutes around Clonakilty.

In Tipperary, the M8 Dublin/Cork road is flooded between J11 Cahir South and J12 Mitchelstown North, the AA says. It advises motorists to take extreme care while driving this road, which has not been closed as of yet.

Flooding has also been reported in Waterford on the N25/Cork road; the N55/Ballymahon Road in Westmeath; the N65 Portumna/Loughrea road in Galway; the N69 Limerick/Listowel road; the M7 Dublin/Limerick road between J9 Naas North and J11 the M9; and a number routes in the Belfast area.

More details can be found on the AA website.

Cork

Gardaí are advising motorists about the following roads in Cork:
  • City Centre in Cork – is passable.
  • Douglas – passable, heavy traffic and water is subsiding
  • Blackpool – both sides of the Church impassable
  • Mallow Road – passable
  • Sarfields Roundabout – impassable
  • Viaduct – a stop & go system is in operation
  • Glanmire – impassable

Gardaí are advising all motorists to drive slowly and carefully in these conditions.

Cork Civil Defence has been tweeting videos and photographs of flooding in Cork, with one person sending in a video of water streaming into a building.



Meanwhile, motorists in Northern Ireland were forced to abandon their cars last night.



One Cork resident sent us photographs of flooding in Douglas Village, in Cork City:




Weather report

Met Eireann says this morning that “a band of heavy rain, with embedded thunderstorm activity and hail, will continue to move northwards this morning producing further flooding”.

There will be drier weather and some sunny spells but there will be scattered thundery showers as well.

Rivers burst their banks

According to Newstalk, Met Eireann said that 15mm of rain fell in Cork overnight, and because three times the average rainfall had already fallen in the city, rivers burst their banks.

Clonakilty has been described on Newstalk by a local as “devastated”, with no access into or out of the town due to the flooding.

TheJournal.ie
...
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Old July 2nd, 2012, 09:18 PM   #87
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Well that was a crap June! From Met Éireann:

Quote:
The Weather of June 2012: Very wet, cool and dull
02 July 2012


Rainfall was well above average with long-term average (LTA) values ranging from 135% at Valentia Observatory to 286% at Casement Aerodrome. Most stations, apart from Valentia Observatory and Belmullet, recorded double or more of their June Average. Of these, most reported it as their highest June rainfall on record, apart from Dublin Airport and Phoenix Park which reported their wettest June since 1993 (19 years) and 2007 (5 years), respectively.

Days that recorded the highest accumulations were mainly on the 7th and 8th, with Shannon Airport measuring 41.8 mm on the 7th, its highest for June since 1947 (65 years). The month’s highest daily rainfall was on the 22nd at Malin Head with 50.9 mm, its highest June fall since 1955 (57 years). The number of wetdays (days with 1 mm or more) were above average ranging from 13 at Malin Head to 22 at Knock Airport, with very wet days (days with 10 mm or more) ranging from three at Valentia Observatory to eight at Phoenix Park and Fermoy (Moore Park).

Mean temperatures were all below average with differences of around 1°C at Johnstown Castle and Malin Head, both reporting their coolest June since 1991 (21 years). Most maximum temperatures were recorded at the end of June, with the month’s highest temperature of 23.8°C at Phoenix Park on the 27th, its lowest June maximum in 5 years. Most other maximum temperatures recorded in the South, Southwest and West were the lowest since 2002 (10 years).

Sunshine was below average with Cork Airport reporting only 93 hours, around half of its average and its dullest June on record. Other stations reported it as the dullest June in a number of years with Dublin Airport and Shannon Airport reporting it as their dullest since 1993 (19 years) and with remaining stations reporting it as their dullest June in at least seven to 15 years.

>>>> The full report is here >>>>
From the report itself:

Quote:
EXTREME VALUES AT SYNOPTIC STATIONS

Rainfall

Highest total: 228.3 mm at Cork Airport (its highest June rainfall since the station opened in 1962)
Lowest total: 110.0 mm at Belmullet
Highest daily rainfall: 50.9 mm at Malin Head on 22nd (its highest June daily fall since 1955)

Temperature

Highest mean monthly temperature: 13.6°C at Shannon Airport
Lowest mean monthly temperature: 11.6°C at Malin Head (its coolest June since 1991)
Highest temperature: 23.8°C at Phoenix Park on 27th (its lowest June maximum since 2007)
Lowest air temperature: 3.2°C at Mount Dillion on 10th
Lowest grass minimum temperature: -1.6°C at Finner on 10th

Sunshine

Highest monthly total: 148.5 hours at Belmullet (its dullest June since 2005)
Lowest monthly total: 93.0 hours at Cork Airport (its dullest June since 1962)
Highest daily sunshine: 14.6 hours at Belmullet on 9th
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Old August 1st, 2012, 01:51 PM   #88
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Like we didn't know!

Quote:
The Weather of July 2012: Relatively cool and dull; wet almost everywhere
01 August 2012


>>> The full report is here >>>

All mean temperatures were below average with differences from average largest in the North and Northwest, up to -1.9°C at Markree. Mean temperatures for July ranged from 12.6°C at Knock Airport, its coolest July since 1998 (14 years), to 14.9°C at Shannon Airport. Malin Head reported a mean temperature of 13.0°C, 1.3°C below its average and its lowest July mean temperature since 1972 (40 years). Most remaining stations reported their coolest July in at least 10 to 24 years. Monthly mean maximum and minimum temperatures were below average.

Maximum temperatures in the South at Roche’s Point and Sherkin Island of 19.4°C and 19.7°C, were their lowest recorded since 1980 (32 years) and 1994 (18 years) respectively, while a majority of other maximum temperatures recorded in West and North were the lowest in five to 24 years. The monthly minimum temperature at Johnstown Castle of 7.4°C on the 12th, was its lowest recorded during July since 1986 (26 years) while some other minimum temperatures in areas of the West, Southwest, South and North were the lowest in eight to 16 years.

Rainfall was above average nearly everywhere, except at Finner in the Northwest which reported a long-term average (LTA) value of around 95%. Remaining stations reported LTAs of between 100% and 200% with highest percentage values reported in the Dublin area, Midlands and Southwest. July’s highest daily rainfall was at Valentia Observatory on the 31st with 32.1 mm. Mullingar reported a highest daily fall of 13.3 mm on the 23rd it’s lowest highest daily rainfall in July since 2004 (8 years). Number of rain days (days of 1mm or more) were on or above average, ranging from 14 in the Southeast to over 20 in the Southwest.

Sunshine totals for July were all below average with percentage values ranging from 67% at Knock Airport to 89% at Casement Aerodrome. Dublin Airport had the most sunshine this month with just under 138 hours and 84% of its LTA; its dullest July since 2003 (9 years).

>>> The full report is here >>>

Met Éireann
Quote:
EXTREME VALUES AT SYNOPTIC STATIONS

Rainfall
Highest total: 169.1 mm at Valentia Observatory
Lowest total: 76.2 mm at Carlow (Oak Park)
Highest daily rainfall: 32.1 mm at Valentia Observatory on 31st

Temperature
Highest mean monthly temperature: 14.9°C at Shannon Airport
Lowest mean monthly temperature: 12.6°C at Knock Airport (its coolest July since 1998)
Highest temperature: 24.3°C at Phoenix Park on 23rd
Lowest air temperature: 4.3°C at Markree on 12th
Lowest grass minimum temperature: 0.9°C at Finner on 12th, Mullingar on 15th

Sunshine
Highest monthly total: 137.8 hours at Dublin Airport (its dullest July since 2003)
Lowest monthly total: 87.9 hours at Knock Airport
Highest daily sunshine: 14.0 hours at Cork Airport on 26th, Shannon Airport on 27th (their highest since July 2005)
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Old August 9th, 2012, 02:21 AM   #89
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Quote:
Belmullet weather station goes automatic

Thu, Aug 09, 2012


BELMULLET, Co Mayo, the last manned meteorological station in the country, went fully automatic from yesterday.

The station replaced the weather monitoring unit at Blacksod lighthouse, 10 miles to the southwest, in 1956. It was from Blacksod that the Sweeney family provided the observations that finally determined the date of the D-Day landings in Normandy in 1944.

The end of an era at the Belmullet station was marked quietly by the staff who are either being transferred or deployed to other duties.

The manager at Belmullet, Donal Shine, and three of his staff, John Hanley, Kevin Donnelly and Willie Byrne, will remain in the station but have been transferred to other duties.

Brian O’Shea has transferred to the station at Ireland West Airport Knock while colleague Conor Lally will transfer to Shannon.

Mr Shine said: “It’s kind of strange to be winding down after all of those years. But I suppose we’ll get used to it.”

The Belmullet station was originally located at Blacksod lighthouse where the late Edward (Ted) Sweeney made weather observations as well as tending to the light.

Vincent Sweeney, one of Ted’s sons, recalls his late father received considerable media attention over the years as “the D-Day weatherman”.

“Quite a number of film crews made their way to Blacksod over the years wanting to hear about the D-Day connection,” Mr Sweeney said.

“There are still inquiries from historians and reporters on the matter.”

© 2012 The Irish Times
In other news, it looks like we're going to get a few nice days with temperatures in the mid-twenties.
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Old August 14th, 2012, 05:55 PM   #90
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Quote:
Issued at 14 August 2012 - 11:20

Weather Warning

A combination of high winds, heavy rainfall, abnormally low pressure and high tides will cause dangerous conditions in south Munster and east Leinster during Wednesday 15th August.

Gale to strong gale force easterly winds, later veering southeasterly to southerly, will occur. Frequent spells of rain will result in accumulations of 30 to 50 mm generally, with higher totals possible in mountainous areas. The will be a high risk of coastal and river flooding.


Valid 0000 15/8/12 to 0000 16/8/12

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Old August 14th, 2012, 09:31 PM   #91
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This countries weather is weird. Sunny one day, typhoon weather the next. Only in Ireland eh?
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Old August 14th, 2012, 09:39 PM   #92
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Tomorrow's going to be interesting!
Quote:
Hurricane Charlie-like weather forecast tomorrow
Updated: 18:55, Tuesday, 14 August 2012

Met Éireann has said parts of the country will tomorrow see conditions similar to those experienced during Hurricane Charlie, which hit Ireland in August 1986.

A weather and gale warning has been issued.

Met Éireann said a combination of high winds, heavy rainfall, abnormally low pressure and high tides will cause dangerous conditions in south Munster and east Leinster.

Meteorologist Vincent O'Shea said that while a storm, not a hurricane, is expected tomorrow, inclement conditions will be experienced throughout the country.

Parts of the country worst affected by Hurricane Charlie, including Dublin and Wicklow, are not likely to experience the worst of the weather tomorrow.

Between 30mm-50mm of rain is expected to fall and with the ground already very wet, Met Éireann has said there is a high risk of flooding.

The Road Safety Authority has advised all road users to take extra care using the roads.

CEO Noel Brett said that after the recent dry weather, roads will be particularly hazardous.

He said there is often a build-up of oil and rubber deposits on roads following dry weather.

"When this deposit mixes with rainwater it increases the risk of a skid and increases your stopping distance", he added.

Story from RTÉ News:
http://www.rte.ie/news/2012/0814/weather.html
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Old August 15th, 2012, 03:32 PM   #93
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Not exactly hurricane Katriona is it?
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Old September 4th, 2012, 10:02 AM   #94
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Quote:
Met Éireann confirms summer was dullest, wettest and coolest in years

AINE McMAHON


Tue, Sep 04, 2012


A wet day on Dublin's Grafton Street in July. Met Éireann said yesterday that sunshine totals for the summer were below average nearly everywhere except in western coastal areas. Most weather stations recorded the dullest summer in a number of years.Photograph: Cyril Byrne

MANY SUSPECTED it and now it’s official. This summer has been one of the dullest, wettest and coolest in years, Met Éireann confirmed yesterday.

Temperatures and sunshine were below average, while rainfall was higher than usual in June, July and August.

Total rainfall was above average across the country but the south was worst hit. In August most stations in Cork recorded above average rainfall, with many reporting their wettest August in 13 to 15 years.

Mullingar and Cork Airport reported their wettest summers since records began, while Claremorris and Knock Airport in Co Mayo recorded their wettest summers since 1985 and 1996 respectively.

The majority of weather stations reported their highest daily rainfall in June.

Nearly all lowest minimum temperatures were recorded in mid-June, with the summer’s lowest temperature of 2.4 degrees recorded at Markree, Co Sligo, on June 10th.

Malin Head recorded the most rain in one day with 50.9mm falling on June 22nd, its highest daily rainfall in 57 years. The west and south recorded more wet days than the rest of Ireland.

Total sunshine was low apart from western coastal areas.

Valentia Observatory reported its dullest summer in 32 years.

The summer’s highest temperature of 26.5 degrees was recorded on August 10th at Shannon Airport, and was the highest in August in Shannon since 2003.

Met Éireann figures show that average air temperatures for the season were also below average.

Sunshine totals for summer were below average nearly everywhere except on western coastal areas.

Most weather stations recorded the dullest summer in a number of years.

With the return of school the weather usually takes a turn for the better and this year has been no exception.

Met Éireann is forecasting dry and warm weather this week, with temperatures of up to 20 degrees later in the week.

Weather forecaster John Eagleton said this was the worst summer since 1986 or “the year of the moving statues”.

“That year was in the height of the depression. Whenever you look at file footage of that year everyone was wearing raincoats,” said Eagleton.

“There should be a few good days this week as fronts are weakening, as opposed to activating earlier this summer.

“There might be a few showers today but nothing particularly bad.”

© 2012 The Irish Times
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Old September 4th, 2012, 03:03 PM   #95
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Was a horrendous summer in Norway and Sweden too. Think most of Northern Europe got it bad this year. Although, the fact that this is the 5th bad summer in a row here in Ireland, the UK and the Benelux is little reported on. Maybe it's just a cycle, but it's very strange that it's not commented on more!!!
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Old October 17th, 2012, 10:45 AM   #96
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Quote:
Flooding causes disruption in Cork and Dublin as 50mm of rain forecast
Updated: 09:18, Wednesday, 17 October 2012

Met Éireann has issued a warning that heavy rain and strong winds will continue for much of today.

Rainfall totals of up to 50mm are expected and there are fears that this, coupled with high tides, may cause flooding.

In Cork, Morrison's Island, Lavitt's Quay, Union Quay, Father Matthew Quay were impassable due to flooding, although flood waters are said to have receded in some areas.

Met Éireann has warned that many parts of Munster and Leinster will experience up to 50mm of rain and east to south-east gale to strong gale force winds.

These conditions are expected to persist for most of the day.

Elsewhere, the N25 Cork to Waterford Rd is flooded west of Kilmeaden at Carrolls Cross.

The Long Mile Road at the junction of the N7 in Dublin is completely flooded.

Iarnród Éireann said Rosslare Intercity and Gorey commuter services are operating as normal.

In Dublin, there are reports of severe flooding on the Pembroke road, Northumberland road, Blessington road in Tallaght and Jobstown.

Flooding has also been reported on Fosters Avenue, the Chapelizod road outbound at Palmerstown and the Walkinstown road roundabout.

The Strawberry beds are closed from Larachon to Tinkers Hill and Slieve Bloom Park in Drimnagh is impassable.

A number of cars are said to be stuck in flood waters on the M1 at Lusk south of Junction 5.

DART services are running with delays from Sandycove after earlier flooding closed the station.

Gardaí have urged road users to exercise extreme caution.

Cyclists should also wear reflective clothing and use lights due to poor visibility.

Story from RTÉ News:
http://www.rte.ie/news/2012/1017/flo...r-warning.html
...
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Old October 26th, 2012, 10:42 AM   #97
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Quote:
Arctic winds bring first winter freeze

RONAN McGREEVY


Fri, Oct 26, 2012

THE CLOCKS go back this bank holiday weekend and with it comes the first freeze of the winter.

Tonight and tomorrow morning will see freezing conditions in parts of the north midlands and Ulster with temperatures expected to get down as low as -2 or -3 degrees.

The mild autumn we have had to date will be interrupted by cold Arctic winds which will bring snow and sleet to parts of Scotland and northern England.

A severe weather warning is currently in place in the northern most parts of Scotland.

In Ireland there is a chance of sleet on higher ground along the east coast, but the chances of snow are “minimal”, according to Met Éireann forecaster Vincent O’Shea.

He said the cold weather will be a “short-lived affair” lasting approximately 36 hours. Saturday will be a cold bright day with good sunny spells.

Milder conditions will return on Sunday with temperatures rising to 9 to 12 degrees, but it will also bring rain to parts of the country.

Bank Holiday Monday will be cold and bright with highest temperatures of 9 to 12 degrees with moderate northerly breezes.

Aoife Carragher, the head of AA Roadwatch, said road conditions could be more hazardous over the weekend.

“It is important to keep in mind that overnight temperatures are expected to drop as low as -3 degrees on Friday night and this will impact on conditions.”

Gardaí have also urged motorists to be extra vigilant as the weather turns colder and the nights get longer.

All motorists should now be thinking “winter ready” and making preparations to make their vehicle safe for the colder weather ahead, they said in a statement.

Ahead of this October bank holiday weekend, Dr Liam MacDaid, Bishop of Clogher, called on all road users, motorists, cyclists and pedestrians, to take special care.

Dr MacDaid said: “We have all been deeply touched by the sad and tragic loss of innocent lives on our roads over the last week.

“I am asking all road users to exercise particular vigilance in terms of safety and to be responsible on the roads over the next days.

“This duty of care also applies to our road use and it is fundamental to the common good of all in society.”

© 2012 The Irish Times
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Old October 26th, 2012, 09:44 PM   #98
JD47
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Are we not said to have snow in six weeks time? I heard it on the radio, yesterday I think.
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Old November 2nd, 2012, 08:29 PM   #99
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Weather News

Tornado in southwest Dublin area in the early hours of October 17th

01 November 2012


A tornado has been confirmed in southwest Dublin area in the early hours of October 17th. At approximately 6am, a tornado travelling in a south-north direction, travelled a mile or more from the Crumlin area towards the Phoenix Park. It caused damage in the order of trees uprooted and damage to local homes. Currently Met Éireann is consulting with tornado research scientist John Tyrrell about this event. Further information will be available in the future after data analysis and a full investigation have taken place.



Met Éireann
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Old November 26th, 2012, 10:37 AM   #100
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Rain causes flooding in east and south of the country
Updated: 08:30, Monday, 26 November 2012


Delgany road in Wicklow is closed

Heavy overnight rain which caused flooding in some parts of the east and south of the country.

Leinster and parts of Munster were worst affected.

In Dublin, gardaí are warning drivers of flooding on the M1 at Dublin Airport, Swords and Donabate.

While conditions have improved, motorists are still advised to drive with caution.

However, in Co Wexford, gardaí are advising that conditions are still treacherous on many roads.

In Wexford Town a number of roads are impassable. AA Roadwatch is reporting severe flooding on the Wexford/Rosslare Road.

Driving conditions in Co Wicklow are also said to have improved - but the Twenty Bends on the Scalp-Enniskerry road remains impassable due to flooding.

The road from Delgany to Killincarrig will be closed for a time this morning.

In Waterford, Dunmore East is badly affected and the N25, at the Waterford/New Ross road is impassable.

In Cork conditions have improved, with some patches of spot flooding, around Glanmire village near John Barleycorn Hotel, Sarsfield Court and Riverstown.

With rain clear this morning, conditions will improve nationally.

Story from RTÉ News:
http://www.rte.ie/news/2012/1126/weather-rain.html
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