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Old December 30th, 2007, 07:03 AM   #1
OakRidge
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Sacramento light rail

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Light rail

The RT operates a 37.42-mile (60.21 km) light rail system, with two lines, 45 stations, and 76 vehicles (Siemens AG Duewag U2A vehicles and more modern CAF vehicles). There are 76 vehicles in the entire fleet. Lines on the system operate from 4:30 a.m. to 1:00 a.m. daily, with service every 15 minutes in the day and every 30 minutes at night. The light rail system, with 49,800 daily riders, is the tenth busiest in the United States.

Most popular light rail stations

Numbers provided are average weekday "on & offs"

* St. Rose of Lima Park 10,100
* 16th Street 6,500
* Watt/I-80-29th Street 4,600

Watt/I-80-Downtown-Meadowview Line ("Blue Line")

The first line, which opened in 1987, was an 18.3-mile (29.4 km) route between Watt/I-80 station in North Sacramento, through downtown, and continuing east on Folsom Blvd. to Butterfield Way station. It was built at a cost of $176 million USD (1987), including the cost of vehicles and maintenance and storage facilities. Much of the line, when it was first built, was single-tracked, though improvements over the 1990s allowed much of the original system to be double-tracked. The line was built mainly using a railroad right-of-way, coupled with use of structures of an abandoned freeway project. A limited portion of the route runs on streets, mainly in downtown Sacramento.

Surprisingly, the line became more popular than anyone anticipated--in fact, so popular that further expansions and improvements were necessary. Two new stations at 39th and 48th streets opened in 1995, and a 2.3-mile (3.7 km) extension to the Mather Field/Mills station opened in 1998. In June 2004, a further extension from Mather Field/Mills to Sunrise was opened.

On September 26, 2003, the South Line opened for 6.3 miles (10.1 km) between the 16th Street station on the Watt/I-80-Downtown-Mather Field/Mills line and a station at Meadowview Road in the south end, which is the first phase of a planned longer 11.2-mile (18.0 km) line to Elk Grove. Much of the extension follows a railroad right-of-way. When it opened, 7 new stops were added to the system. Following a June 2005 reconfiguration of the light rail lines, the South Line merged with the Watt I-80/Downtown line (formerly part of the previous Watt/I-80-Downtown-Sunrise line) effectively combining the old line with the new.

Downtown-Sunrise Folsom Line ("Gold Line")

In June 2005, following a reconfiguration of the light rail system, the Sunrise-Downtown Line (Gold Line) was created (it formerly continued beyond the downtown St. Rose of Lima Park station to Watt/I-80); it runs from St. Rose/K-Street to Sunrise with an extension to the Folsom area that opened on October 15, 2005. On December 8, 2006 it was extended even further to the downtown Amtrak depot (a.k.a. the Sacramento Valley Station); connecting the light rail system to the national rail system for the first time.

Future projects

As mentioned above, the extension to Sutter street in Historic Folsom began service in 2005. On December 8th, 2006 0.7-mile (1,120 m) extension of the existing Gold Line reached the Amtrak station in downtown Sacramento, known as the Sacramento Valley Station. Other future plans also include a light rail line from downtown, via the neighborhood of Natomas, to the Sacramento International Airport, which will open in the future. A planned extension to Roseville, once a top priority, has been on the back burner for years. Extensions to Davis, Elk Grove and other locations are shown on the 20-year plan. In December 2007, Regional Transit committed to completing the extension from the Sacramento Valley Station to Richards Blvd by 2010 which would take it through the planned Railyards project and extend it to the also planned Township 9 development.

Meadowview to Consumnes River College extension begins fall 2007

Construction on the Phase 2 plan for the South line extension has begun. It will go as far south as Consumnes River College. Construction began ahead of schedule and could be finished as soon as 2009. Originally a planned extension all the way to the city of Elk Grove, the line will end at the college due to 4 costly changes made by public demand. These changes include a new station at Morrison Creek (half-way between Meadowview and Franklin), improved pedestrian access to Franklin and center parkway stations, the elimination of certain design options, and a 2000 car parking structure to replace previously planned surface parking at Cosumnes River College.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacrame...ict#Light_rail
Current map


20 year vision map


Quote:
Light Rail Fact Sheet

System
The Sacramento Regional Transit District (RT) light rail
system, which opened March 12, 1987, is an integral
part of the Sacramento region’s transportation infrastructure.
The 37.42-mile line, which links both the eastern and
northeastern suburbs with Downtown and South Sacramento,
carries 50,000 passengers on a typical weekday.
During Fiscal Year 2006, RT light rail vehicles carried
14.6 million passengers (about 82% the number
of bus passengers).

Operations
Light rail trains traveled 78,181,014 passenger miles in Fiscal
Year 2006. RT operates light rail trains seven days a week with
14 trains running at 15-minute intervals during the day, and seven
trains running at 30-minute intervals during the evening and early
weekend mornings. The end-to-end running time on the light rail
Blue Line between Meadowview and Watt/I-80 is 48 minutes. The Running
time for the Gold Line between St. Rose of Lima Park and Folsom is 50 minutes.

RT operates three and four-car trains during the peak periods and two-car trains during the off-peak hours. Single-car trains provide late evening and Sunday service. The light rail dispatch center is staffed 24 hours a day, with two controllers on duty during weekday peak hours. Approximately 208 RT employees support light rail operations.

Track and Structures
The light rail system includes 28.92 miles of double-track and 8.5 miles of single-track. Most ties are wood, although concrete ties have been used on all track laid since 1994. There are 55 mainline switches; 26 are spring operated, 29 are power operated and three are manually operated. All 34 yard switches are operated manually.

Power
The overhead contact system (OCS) uses a blend of trolley wire and catenary. Trolley wire, found downtown, is a single electrical contact wire used by both light rail and historic streetcars. Catenary, a more complex OCS that maintains the wire tension necessary for high speeds, is not currently compatible with the historic streetcars.

The light rail system includes 34 electrical substations that provide power to the trains. "Load sharing" between substations exists so that if a substation shuts down, those on either side continue to feed electricity to that section. When a fault occurs, a blue flashing light is activated and the control center is notified. In an emergency, the fire department can cut power to the entire downtown by using any one of 13 control boxes located throughout the area.

Signaling
Most private right-of-way, including all single-track sections, includes three-aspect (red, yellow, green) automatic block signaling. Light rail operators use "line of sight" when operating on city streets and in low speed double track sections. Most grade crossings are protected by standard railroad crossing gates. Most signal and grade crossing cases display blue flashing lights if they lose power, although backup battery power ensures they will continue to function. Train-to-Wayside Communication (TWC) is used to route trains to their ultimate destination at the 18th Street, Meadowview, Sunrise, Hazel and Folsom interlockings.

Stations
There are 47 passenger-boarding stations in the system. All stations, except the 12th & I inbound station, have Senior/Disabled platforms accessed by ramps or lifts. Twenty-five stations offer bus transfer services and 18 stations have free park-and-ride lots with 7,482 parking spaces. Each station is equipped with at least one fare vending machine. All stations have telephones and most have lighted shelters.

Light Rail Facilities
RT’s light rail facilities occupy a 12-acre site at 2700 Academy Way. They include administrative offices, two facilities for servicing of up to 97 light rail vehicles, two substations and parking.

Fares
RT uses a proof-of-payment fare structure throughout the system, and Transit Officers conduct random train and station checks to verify fare payment. Passengers found without proof of fare payment are issued a citation, which carries a fine between $56 and $250.

Police Services
RT’s Police Services includes full-time contracted Sacramento police officers and county sheriff’s deputies, and RT Transit Officers. RT also contracts with a private security firm to monitor activities at light rail park-and-ride stations and on trains operating at night.

Future Extensions
South Line phase 2 project, which is the highest priority transit project in the region, will extend RT's South Corridor light rail service from the existing terminus at Meadowview Road to Cosumnes River College. The 4.2-mile extension will include four new stations.



http://www.sacrt.com/lightrail.stm
Graph of ridership of US Light rail systems as of 3rd quarter 2007



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...s_by_ridership

Siemens Transportation Systems (Older trains)


Construcciones y Auxiliar de Ferrocarriles (CAF) (Newer trains)
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Old December 30th, 2007, 07:23 AM   #2
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Old December 30th, 2007, 04:54 PM   #3
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What is this thing???
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Old December 30th, 2007, 05:17 PM   #4
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brigde?, it's just zoomed.
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Old December 30th, 2007, 09:04 PM   #5
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Overview

Sacramento's light rail system began operations in the state's capital in 1987. The system was built to be inexpensive, originally being 60% single track. Major funding for the original system came from canceling a new freeway project that was underway and diverting the funds to light rail instead. In fact, a section of the light rail system was built on the unfinished freeway structure.

Since the original opening, large portions of the system have been double tracked, a few stations have been added to fill in gaps, and the end of the Folsom Line has been extended a couple of miles to a new station. In September 2003, a new branch was completed heading south from downtown, and the Folsom Line is being extended 10 miles to finally reach Folsom.

The system still uses its original fleet of 36 Siemens-Duewag U2A cars, which are very similar to the trolleys in San Diego. 40 new vehicles from the Spanish firm Construcciones y Auxilar de Ferrocarriles (CAF) have been ordered to handle the service expansion of the south and Folsom lines.

A 15 minute headway is maintained throughout the day which drops to 30 minutes at night. During rush hour, trains double in length to 4 cars. Single cars are sometimes run on the weekend. Most of the bus lines have been reconfigured to serve as feeders for the light rail, thus reducing the bus traffic downtown.

We will begin our tour of light rail in Sacramento at the northeast end of the system, Watt/I-80. This station is built in the wide median of Interstate 80 on what was originally going to be the start of a new freeway. The station is located directly under the Watt Ave. overpass. There are stairs connecting the two, allowing transfers between light rail and the numerous buses that stop overhead on Watt Ave. There are also a number of rush hour busses that stop at track level.

As we leave Watt/I-80 and head southeast toward town, the line becomes single tracked and we stay on the unfinished freeway in the middle of I-80. Most of the unfinished freeway has been converted to a giant parking lot. The next station, Watt/I-80 West, is a lonely little stop that is only made upon request. It serves mainly as access to the Western half of the parking area.

The line remains in the I-80 median until reaching the next stop of Roseville Road. After leaving Roseville Road, double track resumes. The line continues on the abandoned freeway structure until reaching the Union Pacific right of way, which it will follow the next few miles. The next stop is Marconi/Arcade followed by Swanston. The main train yard for the system is located between the two stations. Right after leaving Swanston, the line becomes single tracked and veers away from the Union Pacific right of way. A series of sharp curves are then negotiated to reach the next station, Royal Oaks.

The line then uses an abandoned Sacramento Northern right of way that follows city streets. The tracks parallel Arden Way until reaching Arden/Del Paso. The tracks then run down the middle of Del Paso Blvd. to reach the Globe Avenue station. After leaving Globe Avenue, the line becomes a single track to cross the American River and some railroad tracks. The line does not get its own bridge, but rather a reserved lane on the bridge for Del Paso Blvd.

As the line nears downtown, it starts running down 12th Street, which ducks under the former Southern Pacific main line just before arriving at the Alkali Flat/La Velentina station. Since 12th Street is one way, the track going against traffic gets a reserved lane. The other track shares its lane with street traffic. A stop is made at 12th & I a few blocks before the tracks turn onto K Street.

The five blocks of K Street shared with light rail have been converted into an auto free pedestrian mall. The Cathedral Square and St. Rose of Lima Park stops are located along the K Street mall.

At the end of the K Street mall, the tracks turn and head south along 7th and 8th, two parallel one way streets. This is also the area where a future extension will branch off to reach the Sacramento Amtrak station, five blocks away. The next stop is at Capitol Mall (7th & Capitol and 8th & Capitol). From these stops, the California state capitol building can be seen at the end of the mall. The tracks continue down 7th and 8th until reaching O street, where they turn east and come together again. Trains stop at 8th & O and then Archives Plaza before turning south on 12th Street. As the name suggests, state office buildings line this section of O Street.

This time, the tracks only stay on 12th street for two blocks before turning east and leaving street trackage. There is a small three track yard located at the corner where the tracks trun. The "R Street Yard" was one regularly used to turn extra cars removed from eastbound trains. The next two stops, 13th Street and 16th Street, are connected with a short section of private right of way that parallels R Street. As the trains make their way along the private right of way, cross streets are blocked with crossing gates. This is a feature common on the rest of the line east towards Folsom, but almost non-existent on the northern part of the line.

Upon leaving 16th Street, the South line tracks split off and follow the Union Pacific Railroad tracks 6 miles south to Meadowview Rd., and the original line climbs up onto the "Bee Bridge". Originally a single-track bridge, a new viaduct for inbound trains was constructed in conjunction with the South Line project. This bridge is so named because of its proximity to the Sacramento Bee newspaper plant. The old Western Pacific main line (of California Zephyr fame) is crossed here. The tracks return to grade level next to The Sacramento Bee building and the 23rd Street station. The Bee is Sacramento's main newspaper.
Folsom Line

After leaving 23rd Street station, the tracks continue down R Street, which in this area looks more like an alley than a main street. The next station, 29th Street, is located under the Highway 99 overpass. Soon after leaving 29th Street station, street running is left behind for good. The next two stations, 39th Street and 48th Street, were not included in the original system, but were added in 1994. They are located in the middle of quiet residential neighborhoods, and were the first stations which were architecturally radically different from Regional Transit's standard "cookie cutter" station design. Although the stations are very nice, they seem to be rather lightly used. The next stop is 59th Street.

University/65th Street is the next stop and is a major transfer point for connecting bus lines. Upon leaving the station, the tracks negotiate a double track bridge to hop over more Union Pacific Railroad tracks. Upon reaching the other side, the line begins following the ex-Southern Pacific Folsom branch line. Originally single track between this viaduct to just west of Watt/Manlove station, a second track was added as part of the new South Line and Folsom Extension projects. The next two stops, Power Inn and College Greens, originally had platforms on the north side only, but new platforms on the outbound (south) track were built. At College Greens, the tracks start paralleling Folsom Boulevard, which they will continue to follow to the end of the line. The next stop, Watt/Manlove, was built with double tracks and two side platforms.

Stops are then made at Starfire and Tiber before reaching the original end of the line at Butterfield. The line then continues to Mather Field/Mills, which was reached on September 6, 1998. Construction of a new station between Butterfield and Mather Field/Mills, Horn Road, has been deferred until funding is identified. Extending service between Butterfield and Mather Field/Mills without needing more vehicles was accomplished by taking advantage of a 10 minute lay over that existed at Butterfield.

On June 13, 2004, the Folsom line was further extended into the city of Rancho Cordova, with new stations located at Zinfandel, Cordova Town Center and Sunrise. A small yard is located here for storage of cars during off-peak periods on weekdays. Trains now get a decent layover--20 minutes. It is estimated that by summer 2005, the line will be further extended eastward to Folsom, with a station in the Historic Folsom downtown district being the terminus. Intermediate stations will be added at Hazel Avenue, Iron Point Road and Silverbrook.

As part of the project, new double track sections were added to the Bee Bridge and from west of Power Inn to Watt/Manlove, with new platforms added at Power Inn and College Greens stations accordingly.
South Line

Phase 1 of the new South Line opened for service on September 26, 2003. It is a 6.3-mile line whose cost was $222 million. The line parallels Union Pacific's former Western Pacific main line, where the famous California Zephyr all-stainless steel cruise train once ran. Like the East Line, all intersections are controlled with crossing gates.

The south line begins at Bee Junction (18th and R Streets) and curves southward to meet the UP. Inbound South Line trains must pass under the East Line's Bee Bridge, which was double-tracked as part of the project. The first station on the line is Broadway, which serves Auto Zone. This is a walk-in station with spectacular triangular arches and a matching canopy covering the outbound track. A center platform serves inbound trains, while outbound trains load onto a side platform. This is the pattern for most of the stations on the new line.

Continuing the trend started with the addition of two stations on the East Line in the late 1990s, stations on the new South Line feature much art and sculpture, created by local artisans. Each station has a completely different look and feel, unlike the economical cookie-cutter station architecture seen on the original system. Broadway sports one of the more spectacular such treatments.

South of Broadway, the route makes a gentle curve to the southeast and crosses busy but narrow Freeport Blvd, into 4th Avenue/Wayne Hultgren station, another walk-in facility serving the working-class neighborhood of Curtis Park. McClatchy High School is located nearby along Freeport Blvd. Another half-mile or so of riding will reach City College station, which is bordered on the west by the campus, parking lot and Hughes Stadium, and on the east by the old Western Pacific South Sacramento freight yard. One can usually see a UP GP-38-2 or similar locomotive idling here as it waits for assignment. Looking north, one can see the Sacramento skyline--a nice backdrop for an approaching outbound train.

While riding, be sure to watch for the sound walls--mostly on the east side of the tracks--which have been painted with leaves and windows in an attempt to ward off graffiti. So far, this seems to have worked.

Following City College, the distance between stations increases to a mile apart. The next station is Fruitridge, with its copper-clad main platform canopies and smaller ones over the ramps for wheelchair users. Although there is a side platform on the outbound track, it is not used and all boarding/alighting in both directions takes place from the center island platform.

After Fruitridge comes 47th Avenue Station, the first one to feature parking. The architecture forms part of a plaza for passengers waiting for buses or trains. The Campbell's Soup plant and the Brentwood and Fullerton neighborhoods are a short walk from the station. Next comes Florin Station, which serves Florin Road, the major east-west boulevard in South Sacramento. The line's largest parking facility and a major bus transfer center are located here. The station canopies curve downward on the west side to protect from wind and rain.

Leaving Florin, the line swoops over Florin Road on its only overpass, made necessary by the volume of traffic. In another mile, riders will arrive at the current end of the line, Meadowview Station. Curved canopies line the west track--currently the only one in use (in most cases). The mosaic artwork is embedded in the canopy supports. Another large and expandable parking lot is at Meadowview. Track storage for up to six LRVs is just south of the station, and the walkway to Meadowview Road parallels the stub tracks.

The equipment used on the South line consists entirely of new CAF LRVs in the 200 series. The delivery of the pilot car, 201, occurred in August 2002, and ultimately there will be 40 of these cars, some of which will enter service in 2004 on the East Line when it is extended to Folsom. The CAF LRVs can trainline with the older Siemens/Duewag 100s, but for now the two fleets are kept separate.

Currently, four trains of 1, 2 or 3 cars are sufficient to run the line at RT Metro's standard 15-minute headways. The running time between Meadowview and St. Rose of Lima Park is 22-23 minutes. Like the other line, headways drop to half-hourly after 7:30pm. On a recent Saturday, one-car trains were operated until noon, and a second car was added at either Meadowview or 13th Street. The schedules between the two routes interface at 16th Street, and convenient transfers can usually be made there.

Phase 2 of the South Line will extend the line further south and east into southern Sacramento County. Funding is already in place, and preliminary engineering is underway. By the end of 2004, the final environ- mental reports should have been submitted, with final engineering and construction continuing to 2007. The route will follow the UP another mile to the Cosumnes River basin, whence it will turn east, ending at Calvine/Auberry. Three intermediate stations are proposed: Franklin Boulevard, Center Parkway and Cosumnes River College/College Square.

http://world.nycsubway.org/us/sacramento/
Additional information.
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Old January 1st, 2008, 11:54 PM   #6
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California is really stepping forward with this really good
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Old January 2nd, 2008, 11:00 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RawLee View Post
What is this thing???
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I know! What is it?!?!
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Old January 3rd, 2008, 09:18 PM   #8
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It's been answered by falubaz:
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brigde?, it's just zoomed.
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Old January 4th, 2008, 12:17 AM   #9
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I've seen videos of this LRT on YouTube, and they really need to give it more ROWs and better rail through a lot of its trip, cause it usually moves VERY slowly during some points.
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You are genius too Electrify, never would have thought of this if not for your thread.
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Old January 4th, 2008, 12:46 AM   #10
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4 trams joined???
Whats the frequency if this huge capacity is needed?
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Old January 4th, 2008, 06:58 AM   #11
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I usually see only two trams joined.
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Old January 6th, 2008, 06:12 PM   #12
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Looks good.
Does it share lanes with cars sometimes or always seperated?
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Old October 19th, 2011, 02:11 AM   #13
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SACRAMENTO | Public Transport

Yes I know there is a bay area thread , but Sacramento is not really the Bay area , San Jose is but i think its time we create threads for all the cities. The Current thread is too big and messy... The Current thread should be for San Francisco and Oakland and the BART system.

Daily Bus Ridership : 105,000
Daily Light Rail Ridership : 50,200
Number of bus stops : 3,541
Number of Light Rail stops : 47
Bus Routes : 62
Light Rail Routes : 2




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Sacramento Light Rail Vignettes 008 by El Cobrador, on Flickr

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Sacramento Light Rail -- Historic Folsom by El Cobrador, on Flickr

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RT Light Rail by El Cobrador, on Flickr

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RT Light Rail -- K Street Mall by El Cobrador, on Flickr

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e-tran Bus by Anthony Ramos, on Flickr

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Sacramento RT Bus by Anthony Ramos, on Flickr

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Sacramento RT Bus by Anthony Ramos, on Flickr



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Old October 19th, 2011, 08:06 AM   #14
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New poster here...

Great to see Sacramento getting its own thread on here, I think it was definitely needed. The only thing I would like to know, if anyone can answer, is when the Green Line to Richards Boulevard is set to open? I cannot find a straight answer on the RT website dedicated to the project, and I have heard dates from late 2010 to early 2012. As a frequent rider on the system (I take the train from Downtown to City College twice a week), I have noticed that construction has progressed fairly well on 7th Street north of H where trains turn into Sacramento Valley Station, so I'm assuming it should be fairly soon?
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Old October 20th, 2011, 03:33 AM   #15
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Frankly, I disagree, given that there's a single thread that works just fine for Japan and Korea. I politely request that the mods merge this thread with the main Bay Area/Sacramento thread, as isn't enough activity to justify separate threads.
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Old October 20th, 2011, 03:56 AM   #16
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Frankly, I disagree, given that there's a single thread that works just fine for Japan and Korea. I politely request that the mods merge this thread with the main Bay Area/Sacramento thread, as isn't enough activity to justify separate threads.
Its ridiculous to have one thread on the Bay area, the area has 3 different systems. The NYC metro threads are separate why can't the Bay Area systems be separate? Your thread is too messy and needs to be cut up. Japan and Korea are different from the US systems.
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Old October 20th, 2011, 04:04 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis View Post
Its ridiculous to have one thread on the Bay area, the area has 3 different systems. The NYC metro threads are separate why can't the Bay Area systems be separate? Your thread is too messy and needs to be cut up. Japan and Korea are different from the US systems.
I would say that there's really not enough activity on the Northern California transit threads to justify splitting them up. Spliting them up would just lead to them sinking into the back pages.
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Old October 20th, 2011, 04:20 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FDW View Post
I would say that there's really not enough activity on the Northern California transit threads to justify splitting them up. Spliting them up would just lead to them sinking into the back pages.
The same can be said for the east coast , but the truth is that Sacramento is not the bay area. Its at least an hr away by car , how can you justify merging threads. Merged threads in my opinion get messy like yours and too big.
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Old November 7th, 2011, 01:50 AM   #19
FDW
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Originally Posted by Nexis View Post
The same can be said for the east coast , but the truth is that Sacramento is not the bay area. Its at least an hr away by car , how can you justify merging threads. Merged threads in my opinion get messy like yours and too big.
In my opinion, I justified the connection via the fact that there is a direct rail and bus link between the two transit systems.
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Old November 7th, 2011, 06:26 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by FDW View Post
In my opinion, I justified the connection via the fact that there is a direct rail and bus link between the two transit systems.
That's beyond ridiculous. There is a direct rail and/or bus link between most of the system in the U.S., if not the world. Let this thread be.
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