daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Photo Forums > Urban Showcase

Urban Showcase Show your selfmade photos



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old November 1st, 2011, 08:21 PM   #61
openlyJane
Human Being
 
openlyJane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Liverpool
Posts: 31,651
Likes (Received): 43396

Quote:
Originally Posted by 600West218 View Post
Jane, I know they are really that old :-)

I just wish they had been allowed to look a little more aged. Look how spectacularly the Town Hall and the Tobacco Warehouse show their age!!
I know you know!

What you are referring to, though, as signs of age - often just means dirt and decay.

Last edited by openlyJane; November 1st, 2011 at 08:29 PM.
openlyJane no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old November 1st, 2011, 09:18 PM   #62
DanielFigFoz
Registered User
 
DanielFigFoz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: No fixed abode
Posts: 4,428
Likes (Received): 890

Great photos! I've never been to Liverpool and your commentary of the UK from an American point of view is very interesting.


As Jonesy said, the post boxes won't get replaced and "Elizabeth Regina" will stay on, along with the ones before.

Indeed, the UK has less crime than the US, I wouldn't feel scared of walking anywhere in the UK at night except for may some alleyways in some places, but not on proper roads, nor are areas considered to be poor here anything like as poor as places like the South Bronx

Its interesting how theres things which I'm very used to, like CCTV, that you've pointed out and something that you're not used to. You should have gone in a hospital to have a look
DanielFigFoz está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old November 1st, 2011, 09:32 PM   #63
EuxTex
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: San Antonio
Posts: 3,097
Likes (Received): 0

Hi Dan
I would like to make a suggestion, if I may. It is for you to read this book that I think would be a fantastic supplement to your recent trip, especially to the Liverpool portion of it. The book is written in the third person but is obviously based on his own experience. The book "Redburns First Voyage" by Herman Melville. Melville did the same tour of Liverpool about 150 years ahead of you and graphically described his experience. I am sure you would enjoy comparing his experience with your own. Remember, not a few of the buildings you photographed were present in Melville's day.

Once again, thanks for taking the effort to share your experience with us.
EuxTex no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 2nd, 2011, 12:02 AM   #64
Pablo Diablo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: European Union
Posts: 1,349
Likes (Received): 240

Quote:
Originally Posted by 600West218 View Post
My third day in Liverpool was spent in the area of the docks exploring some of the museums there. First I walked around the docks themselves a bit:

The Victorians seem to have been into building castle tower look alikes. I like them.

Notice you can see the Anglican Cathederal in the bacground. The central area of Liverpool is fairly compact, and very walkable. That is one of the things I liked most about it.

I think you can notice here what I mentioned when discussing the Tobacco Warehouse. The Albert Docks have been sand blasted so clean that they look new. Personally, I prefer the aged looks of the Tobacco Warehouse. But I guess most potential buyers of Real Estate must prefer it to look new and cleaner, otherwise they’d leave it looking like the T.W.


Some new structures built to blend in. Note the brickwork on the far building. It looks just the same as that on the Albert Docks even though this clearly is a very recently built building.

Could it really be that the Albert Docks was only built 5 years ago and the Liverpool tourism board just SAYS it is 150 years old to draw in suckers like me? Well, I guess I”ll take their word for it that it really is old but if ever they use the T.W. for something I hope they leave the exterior as it is.

An interesting contraption. I road it one night. Sadly I couldn’t get good pictures though the glass because it was raining.


Costa is a coffee shop similar to Starbucks. The bottom level of the docks was populated mainly by souvenir shops and expensive eateries.

This is also the entrance to some exhibit on the Beatles which I didn’t visit.


I believe this is a sports arena/convention center

The Mersey that I saw was always brown in color and rough with big waves and strong currents. I was glad I wasn’t in it. The area across the river is called the Wirral and is interesting in its own right. I visited it the following day.

Leaving the cranes does give it a touch of authenticity.

Finally I had made it around the entire dock and was at the entrance of the Slavery and Maritime Museums which are housed in the Albert Docks.

The Slavery museum was about 1 full floor and was quite good in giving the history of the slave trade. They were surprisingly frank and honest about Liverpools key role in the slave trade. In fact, I found that Liverpudlians over all have come to terms with it in a way that Americans never have with experience with slavery. When I would say to people that Liverpool has spectacular old buildings they would say, “yes, Liverpool made lots of money off the slave trade so they were able to build really nice buildings”. By contrast, I never meet Americans who will admit to the role slavery played in making the U.S. rich.

Unfortunately the museum as quite dark so I didn’t get any decent pictures.

Sadly the same goes for the Maritime Museum, which is much larger than the slavery museum and occupies over two floors. It has lots of really good exhibits and very nice models of ships. It also has really old film of people in Liverpool waiting for word on the fate of their relatives after the news came out that the Titanic sank. Very moving.

This is a replica of a steam engine from one of the early steamships and one of the only pictures I could get.

The central Quay of the Albert Dock
As you can see, the Quays are fully functional and house some good size ships.

Next to the Maritime Museum they had the home of the dock keeper that was set up to look as it would have during the blitz. In fact, one of the biggest things I learned on this trip was that Liverpool and other northern cities were bombed extensively during the war. In the US we are generally led to believe that the blitz was largely confined to London.

I sort of doubt that people would really have had pictures of Churchill on their walls, but who knows?
Outside the Museum they had some ships in drydocks:

This was inside the new Liverpool Museum which is all about Liverpool and its history. Even though it was only partially open it was an excellent Museum that should definitely be visited.

Note the flag is the flag of England not of the U.K. I saw that fairly often, the English rather than the national flag being flown. Doing something like that would probably be illegal in the US, but regardless, you never see it.

Next I headed over to the Three Graces themselves and went in the Port of Liverpool building which mainly seems to be offices of financial firms these days.

You could actually walk up the stairs to the various floors around the rotunda. They had very nice stain glass windows that seem to represent what were the British territories at that time. I saw some names I hadn’t seen in a long time:

Now, if you’ve been paying attention you will note that there is no window for the Falkland Islands. I think Argentina should use this omission to argue that the islands really are theirs after all :-) In any event, I hope you can see that is a beautiful building and merits being explored if you are in the area.

I like the contrast of old and new.

A restaurant named after a ship

Wandering back into the town center I was able to see the Queen Victoria monument that was previously obscured by the Irish parade.


I still had some daylight left so I wanted about in town. Soon I wound up back at the town hall and can’t resist posting more pictures of it.
Now, notice they fly the Union Jack!!

Can’t get enough of this building either:

Remember how the other day I mentioned standing in front of the town hall and not knowing which way to go? Well, this time instead of walking straight down the street that the town hall faces I walked up the street (ie, away from the Mersey) it is on.

And here is what I went by

I love that term “Assurance”
This seemed to be a no longer used rail station converted into offices.


Ok, I have to be a little honest here. At this point Liverpool was actually starting to annoy me. I had a belt pouch for my camera and whenever I would snap a few pictures I would put the camera away thinking I wouldn’t take anymore pictures. Then I would go another block or around a corner and there would be some other spectacular building that I knew I had to take a picture of so out the camera came. Even though I was just wandering around blindly not knowing where I was going it just seemed the spectacle of one building after another would never end.

Note the statues. It occurs to me, not only did this city once have a lot of money, but they clearly wanted to put it in everyones face exactly how much money they had. Showoffs!

Also note, this building is English, not British.

Fortunately for me, daylight soon faded away and I was put out of my building overload misery.

The ferris wheel did look nice at night though.
I'm glad you enjoyed your time here! I'm really enjoying all your photos!

Some recent news that may interest you...

The Stanley Dock area (including the Tobacco Warehouse) has been given government funding to enable its conversion to an Albert Dock style area filled with shops, bars, restaurants, offices and apartments. The funding will also help pay for an improved district heating system for those canal side houses you saw
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england...yside-15537963


Also, HMS Liverpool (the ship that lends its name to the restaurant on James Street) is about return to Britain after a successful deployment in Libya
Pablo Diablo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 2nd, 2011, 12:30 AM   #65
600West218
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 2,733
Likes (Received): 1574

Quote:
Originally Posted by DanielFigFoz View Post

Its interesting how theres things which I'm very used to, like CCTV, that you've pointed out and something that you're not used to. You should have gone in a hospital to have a look
Actually, the CCTV cameras didn't bother me. However, I do know there would be a HUGE uproar in the US if they tried to use them this way. Here lots of people have even gotten up set over red light cameras that take pictures of peoples license plates when they go through a red light.

It is just that there extent surprised me. I mean, the sign on the trains that said "Smile, you are being filmed" was not something I expected to see (and then I spent a half hour trying to figure out where the cameras were!).

I actually did go into hospitals in both Manchester and Leeds. I work in a hospital in the US so I had to check them out. There will be photos and I'll give my impressions.
600West218 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 2nd, 2011, 12:32 AM   #66
600West218
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 2,733
Likes (Received): 1574

Quote:
Originally Posted by EuxTex View Post
Hi Dan
I would like to make a suggestion, if I may. It is for you to read this book that I think would be a fantastic supplement to your recent trip, especially to the Liverpool portion of it. The book is written in the third person but is obviously based on his own experience. The book "Redburns First Voyage" by Herman Melville. Melville did the same tour of Liverpool about 150 years ahead of you and graphically described his experience. I am sure you would enjoy comparing his experience with your own. Remember, not a few of the buildings you photographed were present in Melville's day.

Once again, thanks for taking the effort to share your experience with us.
Thanks, and thanks for the book recommendation. I definitely should look into that. It will be interesting to see what things were like then. I suspect it will be more or less as it is now - culture doesn't change that much.
600West218 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 2nd, 2011, 12:34 AM   #67
600West218
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 2,733
Likes (Received): 1574

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pablo Diablo View Post
I'm glad you enjoyed your time here! I'm really enjoying all your photos!

Some recent news that may interest you...

The Stanley Dock area (including the Tobacco Warehouse) has been given government funding to enable its conversion to an Albert Dock style area filled with shops, bars, restaurants, offices and apartments. The funding will also help pay for an improved district heating system for those canal side houses you saw
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england...yside-15537963


Also, HMS Liverpool (the ship that lends its name to the restaurant on James Street) is about return to Britain after a successful deployment in Libya

Excellent news. I don't think Liverpool should ever be permitted to damage those buildings. It is a UNESCO site. So I think we could send it military forces if we have to to protect the Tobacco Warehouses - they belong to the WORLD after all
600West218 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 2nd, 2011, 01:44 AM   #68
DanielFigFoz
Registered User
 
DanielFigFoz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: No fixed abode
Posts: 4,428
Likes (Received): 890

Quote:
Originally Posted by 600West218 View Post

I actually did go into hospitals in both Manchester and Leeds. I work in a hospital in the US so I had to check them out. There will be photos and I'll give my impressions.
I look forward to that!
DanielFigFoz está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old November 2nd, 2011, 04:54 AM   #69
600West218
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 2,733
Likes (Received): 1574

The fourth day I had scheduled to see the Liverpool War Museum Western Approaches and then take the ferry across the Mersey to see the German U-Boat in Birkenhead.

I actually got into to the center a little early (the Liverpool War Museum is actually right next to the Town Hall but it doesn’t open until 10 am) so I wandered around a bit and found myself behind the Town Hall where I ran across this:

image hosted on flickr

100_1828 by 600West218, on Flickr

What a site! I had actually seen this in Jane’s thread about Liverpool on SC so I recognized it immediately. Yet how close I had come to not seeing it at all. One great thing about simply wandering about is through serendipity you come across really interesting things - but you also risk missing some really spectacular things unless you wander a lot.

Make sure to read the inscription at the top of the base! And also note what is trying to hide under the shroud!

image hosted on flickr

100_1827 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1825 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1828 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1829 by 600West218, on Flickr

Here you can see how it is set right behind the town hall.

image hosted on flickr

100_1830 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1831 by 600West218, on Flickr

And further behind they have this:

image hosted on flickr

100_1834 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1835 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1836 by 600West218, on Flickr

One thing bears mentioning now. I saw lots of war related statues and went to a number of military museums. It was interesting to see the emphasis on World War I, which was a horrific war but which gets very little mention in the US due to the US only getting involved at the late stages of the war. I actually have a relative who was in WWI so I did find it very interesting to be able to learn more about it and the most poingnet part of any museum was actually regarding WWI, which I’ll mention when I get to that part.

image hosted on flickr

100_1838 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1839 by 600West218, on Flickr

Shouldn’t all BMWs have this kind of paint job?

image hosted on flickr

100_1840 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1841 by 600West218, on Flickr

Why is it that in the US we get glass boxes and in England they get this? This could have been built as a plain and ugly glass box but they gave it some flare. American architects really need to come to the other side of the pond and get some ideas.

image hosted on flickr

100_1846 by 600West218, on Flickr

With still more time to kill I wandered down to this church:

image hosted on flickr

100_1845 by 600West218, on Flickr

An adjascent building:

image hosted on flickr

100_1848 by 600West218, on Flickr


image hosted on flickr

100_1847 by 600West218, on Flickr

Back in the church yard there was this memorial to about the Blitz:

image hosted on flickr

100_1852 by 600West218, on Flickr

Sadly, I didn’t take a picture of the plaque but I believe this moment was to the families and young children who went through the Blitz. As I mentioned before, due to its strategic importance as England’s main resupply port Liverpool was the most heavily bombed city after London.

Finally the museum opened and I went in. The museum is located in the bomb proof bunker where British naval commanders oversaw the Battle of the Atlantic - ie, the battle to bring resupply conveys past German U-boats and safely into English ports, primarily Liverpool. Most supplies coming from the west, generally the US and Canada, arrived in Liverpool as that is the closest port for them - hence the term “Western Approaches”.

You go down through several floors each with very thick floors of concrete and each with guard posts. After seeing a few exhibits you finally arrive at what was the heart of this center during the war and what is the center piece of the museum:

image hosted on flickr

100_1854 by 600West218, on Flickr

It is a gigantic map room with maps on a very big table and a huge one a couple of stories tall against a wall. On the maps young women plotted the positions of all convoys, known U-boat positions, aircraft, British ships and other useful information (including weather).

image hosted on flickr

100_1855 by 600West218, on Flickr

You can see the ladder that people had to climb to position things on the wall board. One woman fell and died and was said to haunt the command center after that.

image hosted on flickr

100_1860 by 600West218, on Flickr
The commander of the center had this office with an overview of the map room.

He also had a direct link to the War Cabinet in London:

image hosted on flickr

100_1857 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1862 by 600West218, on Flickr

You can see the commander had a window with a direct view into the map room. On the wall board you can actually see Iceland and Scotland just peaking above the bottom of the window.

Obviously in a place like this secure communications was key and they had lots of it.

image hosted on flickr

100_1863 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1864 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1865 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1867 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1871 by 600West218, on Flickr
Although I am not posting pictures of them they had numerous small exhibits that gave interesting information about the Battle of the Atlantic and the command bunker. The museum was a good small museum and that it was an actual site of key events in the war makes it a must visit site in Liverpool.

Before leaving the museum I spoke with one of the employees there who showed me more pictures of how badly bombed Liverpool was. For all the spectacular buildings it still has it actually lost some of its best buildings in the war. I wondered though, how some key buildings weren’t bombed. For example, why wouldn’t they have bombed St. Georges Hall, if for no other reason than to hurt British morale? The answer she gave was the Hitler himself picked all targets and he didn’t target St. Georges Hall because he wanted to use it for the Nazi government once Germany captured England. Of course, he was getting a little ahead of himself there....

Then I walked down to the river to get the ferry, taking in more sites along the way:

image hosted on flickr

100_1874 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1876 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1877 by 600West218, on Flickr

An interesting and noble apology.

image hosted on flickr

100_1878 by 600West218, on Flickr

Finally, I was aboard the ferry, pulling away from Liverpool:

image hosted on flickr

100_1884 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1885 by 600West218, on Flickr

BTW, the tide was going out and the current was very strong. Fall in that water and you are on your way to Ireland very quickly.

image hosted on flickr

100_1888 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1889 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1890 by 600West218, on Flickr

Note you can see the radio tower in the background

image hosted on flickr

100_1892 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1898 by 600West218, on Flickr

The Tobacco Warehouse!!

image hosted on flickr

100_1901 by 600West218, on Flickr
and the mariners clock.

image hosted on flickr

100_1903 by 600West218, on Flickr

There were actually lots more wind turbines out towards the sea. But they were pretty far away.

image hosted on flickr

100_1909 by 600West218, on Flickr

By the first stop on the Wirral side (to see the U-boat I was to get off at the second stop).

image hosted on flickr

100_1910 by 600West218, on Flickr

Liverpool from all the way across the Mersey.

image hosted on flickr

100_1913 by 600West218, on Flickr

How is this for a view over the Albert Docks and to the Anglican Cathederal? :

image hosted on flickr

100_1920 by 600West218, on Flickr

In this one you have the Anglican Cathederal on the right and the modern Metropolitan (Catholic) Cathederal on the left.

image hosted on flickr

100_1926 by 600West218, on Flickr

Back to the Wirral side:

image hosted on flickr

100_1924 by 600West218, on Flickr


Coming up to my stop:

image hosted on flickr

100_1914 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1918 by 600West218, on Flickr

I went into the U-boat museum which although it was small was quite good with interesting artifacts, excellent explanations, and some really good videos:

image hosted on flickr

IMG_6187 by 600West218, on Flickr

However, what it is most famous for, more famous than even the U-boat, is intact Enigma machines which were the very famous machines used to encode their U-boat communications and which the equally famous British code breakers at Bletchley Park finally broke.

I of course don’t really know how it worked but I from what I understand the correct wheels had to be put in the machine, and then wires had to be connected to a certain pattern in the back of the machine. Once that was done the coded message received over the radio could be typed into the machine using the keyboard and the deciphered message in “plain German” would come out.

image hosted on flickr

IMG_6173 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

IMG_6174 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

IMG_6175 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

IMG_6176 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

IMG_6185 by 600West218, on Flickr

After seeing the indoor part of the museum I went outside to see the atual U-Boat which is cut up in about 4 or 5 big pieces with plexi-glass over all the ends so you can see what is inside each peice.

The U-Boat itself has a very strange story. It fled Germany in the last days of the war with an unknown mission. It had Germany’s most modern and dangerous torpedoes on it. Theories of where it was going and what it was trying to accomplish range from taking top Nazis to South America to taking the advanced torpedo to Japan to help their war effort. It was spotted by British aircraft and sunk by a British ships depth charges. Later it was found and brought up, I belief by some wealthy Danes. No one quite what to do with it nor had money for its display so it eventially wound up in Wirral.

image hosted on flickr

100_1930 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1927 by 600West218, on Flickr

Unfortunately I don’t seem to have gotten people in these pictures so you can see the scale but trust me when I say it is BIG.

image hosted on flickr

100_1928 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1929 by 600West218, on Flickr

Unfortunately it was hard to photograph the interior due to reflections on the glass.

image hosted on flickr

100_1931 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1932 by 600West218, on Flickr

There you get a bit of perspective, but remember that part of the sub is under a platform.

image hosted on flickr

100_1933 by 600West218, on Flickr

This dented portion of the rear is where they believe the depth charge that sank it hit.

image hosted on flickr

100_1935 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1936 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1937 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1938 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1939 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1945 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

IMG_6189 by 600West218, on Flickr

This I believe is a view into the engine room.

Done in the museum I decided to wander around the local area to see what was there. Boy, what you can just stumble upon in England!!

image hosted on flickr

100_1949 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1950 by 600West218, on Flickr

Walking up hill, into the town, in the direction I had been told the central square was in.

image hosted on flickr

100_1951 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1952 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1953 by 600West218, on Flickr

An old train station which is still a train station on the Merseyrail system. I wonder from when the “frequent electric train” sign dates.

image hosted on flickr

100_1955 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1956 by 600West218, on Flickr

I guess in Victorian times they didn’t believe in building anything that was simple and functional!

Finally getting to the town center on top of the hill I came to this:

image hosted on flickr

100_1961 by 600West218, on Flickr

The square was surrounded by these very stately buildings:

image hosted on flickr

100_1958 by 600West218, on Flickr

They seemed to be filled with “solicitors” offices which I later found out was British for lawyers (British lawyers, being more clever than American lawyers, found a way to double their numbers - there is still another type of lawyer in Britain, called a Barrister. And to go to court you actually need one of each!!).

image hosted on flickr

100_1957 by 600West218, on Flickr

Here you get the first glimpse of the Wirral Museum, which is now actually a government office building. Note it is flying the Union Jack, rather than the English flag. It seems completely arbitrary which building flies which flag. I wonder who decides - the janitor? If you didn’t know better you could think the country was on the verge of the civil war.

image hosted on flickr

100_1960 by 600West218, on Flickr

Here is the obligatory list on granite of all the local boys who died in “The Great War”. You read in history books how Britain almost lost an entire generation in the First World War. Seeing all the names on all the monuments you really see that.

image hosted on flickr

100_1962 by 600West218, on Flickr

Given that it is now an government office building it isn’t open to the public. But as I expressed an interest in what was inside and had an obviously foreign accent one very kind employee took me on a tour.

image hosted on flickr

100_1963 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1964 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1965 by 600West218, on Flickr

Note the date below the clock and the two infants to either side.

image hosted on flickr

100_1966 by 600West218, on Flickr

I think this room was named after someone important, but I can’t remember who :-(

image hosted on flickr

100_1967 by 600West218, on Flickr

On this side of the Mersey they had a lot of the same activities as on the Liverpool side. They had a port and they also did a lot of ship building. The bottom line is they had lots of money, and it shows.

image hosted on flickr

100_1969 by 600West218, on Flickr

Sorry for the blurry pictures. It was low light, with a cheap camera, and no tripod. But you get the idea...

image hosted on flickr

100_1972 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1973 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1975 by 600West218, on Flickr

Now, this is what happens when you are lucky enough to find nice people who will show you around. This is a large model of the waterfront of the Birkenhead area from around the turn of the 20th century. It was saved from the museum that used to occupy this building - they didn’t have the heart to destroy it. But they don’t know what to do with it, though they hope to have it displayed again in the future. If they can’t do themselves I certainly hope one of the museums in Liverpool puts it on display. Something like this simply can’t be lost.

Look carefully and you can see some of the buildings I took pictures of down by the U-boat museum

image hosted on flickr

100_1976 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1977 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1978 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1979 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1985 by 600West218, on Flickr


image hosted on flickr

100_1980 by 600West218, on Flickr

More of the buildings around the square. I wonder if they were always offices or if they were maybe residences for the upper crust of the town?

image hosted on flickr

100_1984 by 600West218, on Flickr

I wandered a bit and as soon as you were a block of that main square you came to these type of row houses.

My CouchSurfing host had told me about Port Sunlight, and how it had been a planned community of very nice housing for the workers in the Lever company’s soap factory. I was already planning to see something like this outside of Leeds, Saltaire, but I was told I should see this one too. Given that I had about an hour of daylight left I decided to head over to it.

image hosted on flickr

100_1986 by 600West218, on Flickr

This is the Merseyrail station under Hamilton Square Station. Notice anything funny? Oh yeah, it is spotless and litter free. I think all New Yorkers should come and see this so they can realize that just because you ride a subway doesn’t mean you have to be a pig and throw garbage all over the place.

image hosted on flickr

100_1987 by 600West218, on Flickr

Note the sign saying when the next trains are coming. They just put these type of signs up in New York about 6 months ago, and they make it sound as if it is super high tech and we should all be grateful. The signs on Merseyrail look like they have the NYC subway beat by a decade or two.

Finally arriving at Port Sunlight:

image hosted on flickr

100_1988 by 600West218, on Flickr
image hosted on flickr

100_1989 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1990 by 600West218, on Flickr

The entrance to the “Lever House” factory:

image hosted on flickr

100_1991 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_1995 by 600West218, on Flickr

The factory has a modern part and is still in operation

image hosted on flickr

100_1996 by 600West218, on Flickr

This time I couldn't get past the gate, even with an American accent.

image hosted on flickr

100_1998 by 600West218, on Flickr

The workers homes. Even today they are nice. For their time...

image hosted on flickr

100_2002 by 600West218, on Flickr

There were lots of nice Tudor style buildings. I’m not sure what they all were or when they were built.

image hosted on flickr

100_2003 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_2004 by 600West218, on Flickr

Immaculately designed and maintained homes and immaculate gardens. Stereotypically English.

image hosted on flickr

100_2006 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_2008 by 600West218, on Flickr

A nice sports field of some sort.

image hosted on flickr

100_2009 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_2013 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_2015 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_2018 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_2019 by 600West218, on Flickr

No need to guess how old this one is.

image hosted on flickr

100_2020 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_2021 by 600West218, on Flickr

Its not enough to build your workers nice homes. You have to ensure they are cultured and build them their own art museum as well. I wonder how you get a job with Lever anyways?

image hosted on flickr

100_2028 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_2029 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_2030 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_2031 by 600West218, on Flickr

Eventually, daylight faded and I headed back to Liverpool.

Thus ended Tuesday, my fourth, and last, day in Liverpool. Wednesday I would be wrapping up in Liverpool and heading on to Manchester. It was going to be hard to top Liverpool but I had high expectations for Manchester.

Last edited by 600West218; November 2nd, 2011 at 05:03 AM.
600West218 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 2nd, 2011, 05:16 AM   #70
chase_me
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Manchester
Posts: 148
Likes (Received): 0

Thanks again for those excellent photos! It's been a few weeks since I've been to Liverpool but never travelled as extensively as you have:p and that rail way station you have a pic of (the one with the tower and "frequent services I think it said" ) was actually part of the Liverpool high level, similar to what you have over in your cities in America. http://www.merseytravel.gov.uk/pdf/OverheadRailway.pdf this gives a bit of info about it, or just typing in liverpool high level rail way etc, I think everyone here wishes it still survived -'would have been amazing to go on it today

Anyway, looking forward to your next installment as always:p
chase_me no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 2nd, 2011, 05:18 AM   #71
10123
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 5,505
Likes (Received): 1600

Thoroughly enjoyable so far.

Looking forward to more, although I'm even more looking forward to my glorious home town of Leeds :p
10123 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 2nd, 2011, 05:21 AM   #72
600West218
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 2,733
Likes (Received): 1574

Hang tight, Leeds is coming. :-) I spent three full days in Manchester, plus a travel day to Manchester and another travel day from Manchester to Leeds. But by this weekend I should be getting to pictures of Leeds.
600West218 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 2nd, 2011, 05:23 AM   #73
600West218
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 2,733
Likes (Received): 1574

Quote:
Originally Posted by chase_me View Post
Thanks again for those excellent photos! It's been a few weeks since I've been to Liverpool but never travelled as extensively as you have:p and that rail way station you have a pic of (the one with the tower and "frequent services I think it said" ) was actually part of the Liverpool high level, similar to what you have over in your cities in America. http://www.merseytravel.gov.uk/pdf/OverheadRailway.pdf this gives a bit of info about it, or just typing in liverpool high level rail way etc, I think everyone here wishes it still survived -'would have been amazing to go on it today

Anyway, looking forward to your next installment as always:p
So the elevated train crossed the Mersey (in a tunnel obviously) and went to Birkenhead?

Paul told me about the elevated train and then I saw some books about it in gift shops. One problem on this trip was I was trying to travel light so I didn't get to buy as many books as I would have liked.
600West218 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 2nd, 2011, 06:00 AM   #74
chase_me
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Manchester
Posts: 148
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by 600West218

So the elevated train crossed the Mersey (in a tunnel obviously) and went to Birkenhead?

Paul told me about the elevated train and then I saw some books about it in gift shops. One problem on this trip was I was trying to travel light so I didn't get to buy as many books as I would have liked.
No I dnt think so, it was only around the dock areas on the actual Liverpool side I think, the report mentions only 11 stations and spammed 6miles so must be just on the one side - the tunnels to the Wirral side is what the current merseyrail uses now as it did then. Someone from Liverpool will probs explain in more detail later on as I'm not too sure of what I say is quite right since I'm not from there. And yes travelling light is best, though I always buy lots of stuff when away, and I go mostly to Asia these last few years so go with one suitcase and come back with about two or three! but amazon helps get those books if you still want them!

BTW you were in Manchester on a Thursday? If you visited the cathedral in the afternoon that day you probs wudve seen me there as I help out front on thurs afternoons
chase_me no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 2nd, 2011, 08:35 AM   #75
WrathChild
Registered User
 
WrathChild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Argentina
Posts: 803
Likes (Received): 422

GREAT thread. Loving it.
Liverpool looks fabulous...
WrathChild no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 2nd, 2011, 01:20 PM   #76
Regener8tor
Adopted Loiner
 
Regener8tor's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Leeds
Posts: 1,124
Likes (Received): 466

Great thread & really looking forward to the next update. Especially Manc & Leeds!

Shame about the weather though :-(
Regener8tor no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 2nd, 2011, 03:00 PM   #77
christos-greece
Moderator!
 
christos-greece's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 176,508
Likes (Received): 244321

Good looking and very nice photos; looking forward too for any updates
__________________
Urban Showcase: Athens Kalamata Trikala Thessaloniki
Cityscapes: Paris Barcelona Dubai, U.A.E. Monte Carlo, Monaco
General photography: Castles of France - Chateau de France and, since May of '08: Greece!
christos-greece no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 2nd, 2011, 05:19 PM   #78
Steel City Suburb
Registered User
 
Steel City Suburb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 3,723
Likes (Received): 236

Very nice.

Good thread.
__________________
Discover Sheffield
Steel City Suburb no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 2nd, 2011, 06:51 PM   #79
Bristol Mike
Rain + Cold = England
 
Bristol Mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Bristol
Posts: 5,305
Likes (Received): 2373

Fantastic photo thread here and a great commentary - interesting hearing it from a non-British point of view. I suppose the only shame was the weather. Out of all the glorious days in October, the weather had to be like that for you in Liverpool.
Bristol Mike no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 2nd, 2011, 08:15 PM   #80
Pobbie
BANNED
 
Pobbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Somewhere
Posts: 8,201
Likes (Received): 23

Quote:
Originally Posted by 600West218 View Post
So the elevated train crossed the Mersey (in a tunnel obviously) and went to Birkenhead?
No, the Overhead Railway was on the Liverpool side only. Hamilton Square station was opened in 1886 in conjunction with the opening of the Mersey Railway Tunnel, though the sign on the hydraulic lift tower can only date back as far as 1903 (that's when the line was first electrified). The tower had a twin across the river at James Street station (right next to The Liverpool pub you posted pictures of), but it was destroyed in WW2.

What a fantastic photographic tour you have provided of my home town, and it's nice to hear you had such a great visit. You managed to cover a lot of ground, including several interesting sights off the beaten track which most tourists have no idea exist. It's always enlightening to listen to an outside perspective of familiar things. Just a shame you had to visit during such a drab spell of weather (a week without sunshine is unusual even here) - a week or so earlier it was shorts and ice-cream weather.

Thanks again.
Pobbie no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium