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Old November 4th, 2011, 12:43 AM   #121
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Old November 4th, 2011, 01:36 AM   #122
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Splendid stuff 600West218, I'll try and fill in some of the blanks so to speak.


This is St Andrew's Church:-

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It is due to be restored and turned into student flats...


Quote:
Originally Posted by buggedboy View Post
Planning application now in. Apparently all the funding for this has been secured, including a Heritage grant. They have sold all the units to investors too.

100 student bedrooms.

http://northgate.liverpool.gov.uk/Pl...DAURI=PLANNING



The two adjacent buildings are The College of Technology and Museum extension on the left, and The William Brown Museum and Library on the Right. Today, they both form the World Museum:-

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This building is County Sessions House, a former court house.

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This sculpture is called the Spirit of Liverpool, and sits atop the Walker Art Gallery. It is actually a replica of the original artwork, which had deteriorated to such a poor condition it was feared that a piece might break off, fall through the glass dome on top of the gallery and join the sculptures on display in the gallery itself!

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Liverpool Central Library sits between the World Museum and the Walker Art Gallery, but it is currently being redeveloped, hence the scaffolding and tower cranes. Normally, that part of the ensemble looks like this:-

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image by Bernard Rose

Last edited by yoshef; November 4th, 2011 at 02:01 AM.
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Old November 4th, 2011, 01:54 AM   #123
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Wow, thanks for the information Yoshef.

Why is the St. Andrews church in that state? Was there a fire?

Also, you mention a museum above - is it open to the public and if so what does it contain?
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Old November 4th, 2011, 02:14 AM   #124
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I think the church has been closed for years, and left to rot like much of Liverpool during the 70s, 80s and 90s. Pretty sure that it has been set on fire too


The World Museum is actually the city's main, general museum, surprised you didn't pop in for a nosey. There's loads of info on Wikipedia and the museum's website.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Museum

http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/wml/
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Old November 4th, 2011, 02:45 AM   #125
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ah ok, it is sort of a Museum of Natural History. Those I wasn't visiting. Only if it had exhibits specifically on Liverpool would I have been interested.

Thanks for the information. It's quite helpful
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Old November 4th, 2011, 02:53 AM   #126
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AWESOME photos! Keep it up!
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Old November 4th, 2011, 04:25 AM   #127
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In the previous photo post I had finally arrived in Manchester and was getting oriented to the city center - which I was discovering is quite big. I wandered down Deangate Street and ran into the John Rylands LIbrary which is very famous and quite old:

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It is open to the public so I went inside. You actually enter in a new annex and see something like this where the buildings have been joined:

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Entering the old building I walked up several flights of stairs to get to the main reading room.

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Interestingly, I often take visiters to New York City to the Main Research Library on 42nd Street and up to the huge open reading rooms on the 3rd floor which are quite impressive. This is the same sort of room, but completely different. Whereas the one in NY is a huge open room with hundreds of people and lots of distractions (including more than a few tourists!) the one in John Ryland was somewhat smaller and much more intimate. In fact, the actual study areas where tucked away in little alcoves to the side of the room which gave people a fair amount of privacy and freedom from distractions.

I didn’t think it appropriate to direct pictures of people but here you can partly see where people study:

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Turns out, you are not supposed to take pictures here at all but I still snuck in one more of the entranceway:

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They also had a very large exhibit on the history of various books but I didn’t have time to take that in.

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Looking along the side:

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And in good Manchester form next door was an ultra modern glass building with a completely glass entrance to a chic underground eatery.

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Continueing on down Deansgate:

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One thing that I noticed, unless my perceptions are mistaken, was that Liverpool had more stone structures in its center whereas Manchester seemed almost entirely brick. Not 100% sure if that is true, but it is my perception. Don’t know why that would be. Maybe there are more quarey’s around Liverpool?

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Now, this is a strange picture:

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The reason I say it is strange is that in this picture this warehouse looks small for some reason whereas in reality it is HUGE. Not Tobacco Warehouse size but certainly very big. I don’t know what its history is but it impressed me and I would go in it a couple times later.

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This is the Hilton Hotel and if the information given on the ferris wheel is correct it is the tallest building in Manchester. By American standards this isn’t bad but by British standards it is rather dull.

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The Hilton as seen from the other side of the tracks:

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Ok, this seems to be a canal or mill race of some sort. Things are getting interesting:

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Ok, that was clearly some old brick work, and old bridge and an artificial waterway. My pulse rate is starting to pick up.

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Ok, paydirt. These signs clearly tell me I’m in thee right place (besides being interesting in and of themselves)

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Canal boats... this is getting better by the minute.

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Pretty big motor boat for a inland city that isn’t even on a lake. Looking back on it now, that was really just an indication of how big their canal network is.

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Its really good that they reuse these buildings and in that way keep them around. I suppose you can’t simply keep them empty and authentic looking and in the process turn a big section of your city into a museum. Still, I wish they could somehow do this while retaining a bit more of the authenticity of the buildings.

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One little factoid I never bothered to find out while there is how deep these canals are. I am guessing somewheres between 5 and 8 feet. I actually bought a book that probably says how deep they are and I’ll have to look it up unless someone here knows.

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This was right by the canal and I think it might have been an old house for the overseer of that section of the canal.

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Ok, here you can start to see the most dominant feature of this area - three huge viaducts carrying trains over the canal area. Actually, I first saw these from the train when I had just arrived in England and was riding from the Manchester Airport to Liverpool. Their massive brick and steel structures were quite impressive as seen from the train and that was when I first thought to myself “I am going to like this place”.

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Notice the canal has widened out into a pretty significant body of water. I think what happened here was there were factories and warehouses all over this area and each of them built extensions of the canals right up to their buildings so they could ship and receive goods. Hence this whole area is laced with waterways.

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Not sure who lived there.

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I guess some people were already in the Halloween mood.

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I know some have commented that it is a shame it rained some of the time I was there. Frankly, I think the clouds and rain added to the character of the place.

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Truly spectactular. I know its just an old warehouse but I would put this building right up there with Liverpools’ Three Graces in terms of “wow” factor. Why don’t architects design stuff like this any more?

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Ok, here you can see the big brick and iron viaduct in the foreground, the huge steel one immediately behind it, and another brick one in the distance. You know how we often know have huge highway interchanges? Well, I guess you could say this is the 19th century version of that. This could well have been one of the world’s busiest transportation centers in the world.

When this place was at its peak of activity (1880?) it really must have been an amazing beehive of activity. To bad movies and even still photography had yet to be invented. (though if anyone knows of any really old pictures of this area online PLEASE do share the link!)

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Interesting combination of the very mondern seen through the very old.

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Trains were going by all the time on the viaducts. That looks like it might actually be a tram.

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I know it is a poor quality photo but you can see how the canals were built right into the buildings.

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Walking a bit further down along the canals I came to a number of huge and super sleek apartment buildings.

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Not sure if I’d want to live in a fully see through apartment :-)

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Notice how a canal branches off from the larger body of water.

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Some high end graffitti and the train on the right is actually a NYC subway.

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In probably 100 yards I’ve gone from super old brick warehouses to this. That is Manchester for you. It takes some getting use to but with time it does grow on you.

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These may have been about the only cows I ever saw in England. Thinking back on it I saw plenty of horses and an absurd number of sheep but not much in the way of cattle. In fact, I can’t recall even seeing barns. Do they import all their milk?

It was starting to get late and I had to get back to the center of town and catch a bus to southern Manchester (down by the southern cemetary) where I would be staying with a CouchSurfer. The fact that bus drivers were so helpful and shouted out to me when I needed to get off the bus was a real life saver.

Speaking of bus drivers there was another thing that completely amazed me. In England, you don’t need to have exact change to ride a bus. The bus drivers have money and make change. Even stranger, they aren’t enclosed behind bullet proof plexiglass or anything. They would seem to be sitting ducks to be robbed, but apparently they aren’t. If that was tried in the US there would probably be a lot of dead bus drivers.

Anyways, I got by bearings and tried to walk the most direct route back to the Piccadilly Gardens area where the bus station was.

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The Town Hall. What else could it be? During my trip I went to four major cities and each one of them had a huge and spectacular town hall. Very sadly, I never managed to get into a single one (and I did try).

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I think a big part of the purpose of these Town Halls was just to show how much money the city had.

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This was a fairly decent sized Chinatown.

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I finally made it to the bus station. Caught the 111 bus and made it safely to the home where I was staying. Thankfully England is an easy and safe place to travel!

Last edited by 600West218; November 4th, 2011 at 04:34 AM.
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Old November 4th, 2011, 05:00 AM   #128
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You are not kidding, this got better by the minute. Love the canals, warehouses, and then modern apartment buildings. And all of it!

The library looks like a cathedral.

The US is looking lame after seeing your tour of Liverpool & Manchester.
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Old November 4th, 2011, 07:49 AM   #129
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Man, I am salivating at those canal-side warehouses. Victorians take a lot of flack--but it beats me how their WAREHOUSES are more dramatic, engaging and invigorating than most modern buildings . . .

I suspect Manchester is something of an acquired taste--you have to work at it a little--but I found, from your pictures, it well worth the work. Love it!
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Old November 4th, 2011, 12:02 PM   #130
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Quote:
Originally Posted by openlyJane

Don't agree with you there at all. When I lived in Buckinghamshire, for example - it really was true that people almost, did think the north of england was a foreign country.

Most people, anywhere in the world, tend not to venture too far from their own back yard. Many British people know more about Spain or the Canary Islands, for example, than they do about other parts of Britain.
I guess there are people like that but just thinking of all the people I know for example I doubt there is anybody who hasn't been to London, 90% have visited Birmingham, Manchester and Liverpool at some point as they are close, most will have to Leeds, Sheffield, Bristol, Edinburgh, Cardiff etc at least once. Also smaller tourist cities like York, Chester, Cambridge, Bath etc are well known and coastal cities like Brighton and Bournemouth are visited a lot.

Maybe fewer have been to places like Nottingham or Plymouth or Swansea but still many have. Cities like Aberdeen and Belfast are probably the least commonly visited by people here.
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Old November 4th, 2011, 12:06 PM   #131
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Anyway, more great photos, I'm glad Manchester grew on you after a while. Personally I really like the combination of old and new though I guess if you've come to see old then the new isn't what you want to see.

Regarding cows, there are millions in the UK and I don't think any fresh milk is imported. It's just that the hilly, upland areas of northern England you travelled through are more suited to sheep farming.
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Old November 4th, 2011, 12:30 PM   #132
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Glad you got off Market Street and carried on down Deansgate and found your way around Castlefield. I used to walk the very same route every day when I lived in one of those four modern tower blocks you photographed at the far end of Castlefield, St Georges Island. Never got bored of it. As with your trip around Liverpool, it’s really fascinating to see the city through your eyes, am pleased that there’s more to come!
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Old November 4th, 2011, 12:36 PM   #133
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The Arndale area is improving, I remember when the whole shopping centre was covered in those beige 'public toilet' style tiles like the tower, it was cramped and dark inside and there was a dirty indoor bus station choked with diesel fumes..

Now the interior is much improved, much of the exterior also looks better and the buses have moved to a new improved home.
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Old November 4th, 2011, 12:37 PM   #134
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The little hut on the canal side is ducks

Great pictures by the way.
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Old November 4th, 2011, 12:39 PM   #135
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yoshef View Post
I think the church has been closed for years, and left to rot like much of Liverpool during the 70s, 80s and 90s. Pretty sure that it has been set on fire too


The World Museum is actually the city's main, general museum, surprised you didn't pop in for a nosey. There's loads of info on Wikipedia and the museum's website.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Museum

http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/wml/
I've also got a few photos of some of the exhibits on my thread.
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Old November 4th, 2011, 03:00 PM   #136
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Wonderful pictures so far of both our fantastic cities!

I'm hoping you ventured around Whitworth Street and Oxford Road in Manchester for some more great architecture!

Did you check out Worsley by the way? A few miles from the city centre, but played a very important role in the Industrial Revolution in the Manchester area & beyond.

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Old November 4th, 2011, 03:18 PM   #137
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Hey good to see your updates again:p and il dig up some photos of castlefield, they'll be knocking around somewhere - the council only had one photo dating back only to 1960s and it didnt show much. As for the town hall, I don't ink many people can go in at the moment as it's being refurbished along with central library. In the 40 or 50s there was a plan to demolish most of Manchester and it wasn't decided whether the town hall would stay or it, as there were two plans...luckily they didn't have enough money to carry these plans out though a fair few buildings on Portland street were demolished...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Northern_Warehouse. Also that gives a few details about the great northern warehouse you saw in front of the Hilton/Beetham tower. This next one has loads of photos of Manchester separated into sections and topics http://manchesterhistory.net/manches...sterview2.html.
This one gives some pics people have taken of the canal/tunnels underneath it (great northern). http://www.28dayslater.co.uk/forums/...ad.php?t=53777

Last edited by chase_me; November 4th, 2011 at 03:27 PM.
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Old November 4th, 2011, 03:23 PM   #138
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Rain in Manchester?! How strange... (that's all I've heard it do in Manchester).

Fantastic tour of the city, it looks great even in such weather. Loving this thread. Look forward to more!
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Old November 4th, 2011, 03:30 PM   #139
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Quote:
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Rain in Manchester?! How strange... (that's all I've heard it do in Manchester).
Bristol actually gets just as much rain as Manchester.
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Old November 4th, 2011, 03:32 PM   #140
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Doesn't always rain in Manchester at all There are a lot wetter places.

Pure blue sky here at the moment.

Did you get down to Salford Quays on your travels? Some stunning views there, although its nearly all post 1990.
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