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Old November 24th, 2007, 08:16 PM   #521
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TTC revamps approved
Transportation agency recommends province give the TTC $424 million for signal system, new trains

November 24, 2007
Tess Kalinowski
Toronto Star Transportation Reporter

The TTC has received fresh support to expand capacity on its overburdened Yonge-University subway line in a large package of transit improvements approved yesterday by the Greater Toronto Transportation Authority.

The province's new transportation planning body is recommending the province give the TTC $424 million over the next five years to install an automated signal system and add 21 trains and crossover tracks on the 55-year-old Yonge line.

Together, the improvements would allow Canada's oldest and busiest subway line to handle 30 to 50 per cent more passengers by 2017.

Work on the signal system, known as automatic train control, has already begun as part of keeping the TTC in good repair.

The computerized system, considered the international standard, replaces the colourful wayside signals that tell train operators whether to speed up, slow down or stop.

But as the TTC tries to keep up with a backlog of renovations, items like that have contributed to a massive shortfall predicted to hit the commission's long-term capital budget.

If the province agrees to pay for the subway improvements, it would alleviate that shortfall – an estimated $698 million to $1.5 billion between 2008 and 2012 – according to TTC chair Adam Giambrone.

The new trains, to be delivered starting in 2009, can accommodate about 10 per cent more people – 1,200 to 1,300 passengers – and are considered about three times as reliable as the existing model.

They also come ready to use the new signal system, which will make it possible to run them at higher frequency, said Giambrone, who also sits on the GTTA.

"You take all of that together and we have up to a 50 per cent capacity increase. You could run a train every 10 seconds but you wouldn't be able to get people on and off trains, so you have to be realistic," he said.

The Bloor-Danforth line, which isn't quite as crowded yet, will eventually be converted to automatic train control too, he said.

The GTTA also is recommending $7.1 million for startup costs on the Transit City light rail network and a designated bus lane on Yonge St. between Finch and Steeles Aves. that would give mass transit vehicles from around the region priority on the heavily congested stretch.

The subway improvements, including the new Toronto Rocket trains, are a prerequisite to expanding the Yonge subway into York Region, TTC chief general manager Gary Webster told the GTTA.

The TTC projects were among more than a dozen selected by the authority as the next round of transportation priorities among a $9 billion regional wish list.

Others include bus rapid transit along Hurontario St. in Mississauga, another BRT line along Dundas St. in Burlington and Oakville, and service expansions on York Region's VIVA transit.

There's no guarantee Queen's Park will fund the projects, but all are among the 52 improvements called for in Premier Dalton McGuinty's MoveOntario 2020 plan, announced in June.

An earlier list of so-called "quick wins" – projects chosen because they could be initiated quickly and demonstrate the GTTA's seriousness about getting the region moving – was released in July.

It included a series of GO Transit expansions, improved bus service in Hamilton and a new Cornell transit terminal in Markham.

In September, McGuinty endorsed that list.

The GTTA has also committed to creating an integrated web-based trip planner that would allow transit users to easily plot trips that require transferring across the various regional transit systems.
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Old November 25th, 2007, 10:21 AM   #522
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It isn't mentioned in the article, but that signal system improvement on the Yonge will also allow all-night service on the Yonge (trains would probably be turning back at Union at first during the initial operation period?)
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Old November 30th, 2007, 06:18 PM   #523
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Still a subway to nowhere?
Construction booms, but opinions remain sharply divided as the often-derided Sheppard line turns 5

24 November 2007
The Toronto Star



The futuristic chrome plating in Sheppard-Yonge station already looks a little scuffed. But it was only five years ago - Nov. 22, 2002 - that then-mayor Mel Lastman cut the ribbon to open Toronto's northern east-west subway line, accompanied by a phalanx of dignitaries, reporters, children and musicians. Even the U of T's infamously discordant engineering department band came out to crash the event in the former North York, piling onto the subway cars with tubas and drums in tow.

The new line was always central to Lastman's long-held dream, going back before amalgamation, to when he was mayor of North York and wanted it to have a downtown - an urban focal point that could compete with the big one in the old city of Toronto. The Sheppard line would not only spur development along its path, but speed commuters into North York City Centre.

There were tall buildings in the area before this subway opened, but five years of operation has transformed the landscape. Both Yonge St. and Sheppard Ave. E. are dotted with construction sites and billboards announcing new projects. Tens of thousands of residents have moved into the corridor, with tens of thousands more to come.

But old questions still dog the billion-dollar line. Why is it still so easy to get a seat on the trains? Why are the sidewalks on Sheppard so empty? Are we creating urbanity or merely plunking a lot of tall buildings into a suburban landscape where residents are more likely to drive than walk or use transit?

It depends who you ask.

"A very definite urban design theme has emerged," says Niall Haggart, vice-president of the Daniels Corp., which has brought more than 2,500 condo units to the corridor. "I think that someone will be able to walk out of their building and have eyes on the street."

He adds that when the NY Towers project was introduced, "it was marketed with the Sheppard subway clearly front and centre."

Dianne Braun, who lives in a condo near Bayview Ave. and Sheppard, says the subway is a pleasant amenity - but she doesn't use it. She drives to her job as an executive assistant even though her office is right on the subway, too, at Yonge and Eglinton.

"I get free parking at the office, and it's underground parking, so I prefer it," she says, though she thinks the Sheppard subway has made her neighbourhood more desirable.

Jane Renwick, editor of Urbanation, a quarterly that tracks Toronto's condo market, is among those impressed by downtown North York's transformation.

"There's a lot of highrise residential," she says. "You look at it, and you think, 'This could be any small city in the U.S.' ... it's becoming a bigger centre, and I think that's ultimately because it's a transportation hub."

Then there's Brian Harvey, a librarian who lives in a condo near Yonge and rides the Sheppard line to work every day.

"There's absolutely nothing along Sheppard that's worth going to, except for IKEA, if you're an IKEA person, and I'm really not," he says. "Other than that, there's about 25 blocks between anything of note."

Harvey might be exaggerating a bit, but Sheppard today still has the feel of a high-speed suburban arterial - an adolescent road in the midst of a sudden and painful maturation. New towers loom behind single-family bungalows. Parkettes front onto six uncrossable lanes of speeding traffic. And nearly everywhere you look, there's construction.

Near Sheppard and Leslie St., giant piles of earth mark the site of the biggest project of all: Concord Park Place, a 17-hectare master-planned community that is expected to eventually hold 10,000 residents. It's so big it will have its own shuttle bus to ferry people to and from the nearest TTC stations - Bessarion and Leslie, the two least-used subway stops in Toronto.

Change hasn't been easy. The scale and speed of the developments that followed the subway took both residents and elected officials by surprise. The city found its land-use plans being overturned by the Ontario Municipal Board, the provincial panel that has the last word on what gets built in Toronto. Meanwhile, neighbourhood associations waged trench warfare against developers who wanted to build towers - almost literally - in their backyards.

"We didn't really care for the subway along Sheppard," says Poonam Jain, president of the Bayview Village Association. "It didn't seem to make sense. Even now, people are talking about how Mel Lastman managed to wrangle it, even though there were other places in Toronto that needed subways."

Jain says residents knew there would be some development along the way, but not this much. With development comes noise, disruption and traffic - traffic that overflows from Sheppard and infiltrates the winding, residential streets nearby.

"We had a lovely peaceful place here - an island of serenity - and it's being destroyed," she says.

In response, groups such as the Bayview Village Association and the Sheppard-Leslie Homeowners Association - a group formed specifically to fight another new development - dug in their heels, insisting that the condo towers be scaled back, if not cancelled.

But the subway is also the reason some condo-dwelling, transit-riding newcomers have chosen to make the area home.

"When we moved to Toronto, we basically lived here for the subway," says Nori Bradley, a former Vancouverite and now a University of Toronto medical student who lives at Bayview and Sheppard. Like her husband, she commutes to the old downtown every day. Bradley says that living on the subway lets her leave her car in the garage 80 per cent of the time, except for trips to Costco and her husband's hockey games.

This summer, during the budget crisis at city hall when Mayor David Miller mulled mothballing the Sheppard line as a cost-saving measure, the story hit home.

"Closing it down would totally change our lives," Bradley says. "To shut it down would be like shutting us off from everything."

In the end, the line was spared, but the so-called "subway to nowhere" remains a subject of debate and an object of derision, even if daily ridership has risen steadily over the past five years to 43,260 from 34,700 (Projections had called for 48,000 in Year 1).

The line was originally meant to run out to Scarborough, but was truncated to its current five stations. Construction started in parallel with another line along Eglinton West - a project that many continue to argue was a much bigger priority. But after the provincial Conservatives came to power in 1995, work was halted and the Eglinton pit filled in. Lastman and others, however, won a reprieve for Sheppard.

The fact that Sheppard was never built to its full length still rankles city councillor David Shiner. A committed supporter of the line, Shiner pins the neighbourhood's growing pains on the line's curtailment, and the OMB, which let development run beyond what the city had planned for.

"We've ended up in a situation where there's almost double the development that was proposed, the traffic impacts have been horrendous and the subway line does not carry people anywhere but to Yonge St. and downtown," he says.

"I think the No. 1 priority of the city right now should be to complete the Sheppard line out to Scarborough. The residents of Scarborough and the residents of North York deserve to have a better trans link into the centre of the city."

To the dismay of Shiner and other subway boosters, finishing the line doesn't seem to be in the cards any time soon. The TTC's latest plan for the corridor calls for a streetcar right-of-way, or LRT, to complete the route along Sheppard.

"Instead of spending a billion dollars to finish the line, we can do (about) 10 times as much LRT for that same amount of money," TTC chair Adam Giambrone says.

Giambrone adds that he'd like to see the subway finished, but it could be decades before enough ridership and money are in place.

Meanwhile, many still ask whether Sheppard - with its asphalt-surrounded malls, long blocks and suburban cul-de-sacs dotted with occasional highrises - was ever a good candidate for a subway.

Among those is veteran transportation consultant Ed Levy.

"A few highrise towers on the skyline does not indicate subway-type density," he says.

"There's hardly a building more than 20 or 25 storeys high in all of Brooklyn," he says, "but it's lined with neighbourhoods that have townhousing and four- to six-storey apartments solidly, mile after mile after mile. They're able to fill up subway lines running about a mile apart." But here, he says, single-family neighbourhoods are sacrosanct.

"Any time someone dares breathe something over three, four, five storeys, there's general hysteria."

Ken Greenberg, a local planning consultant, points out that Sheppard is "relying on bus feeder lines, as opposed to a large walking population around it."

To truly be successful, he says, the city needs to allow intensification away from the major intersections where towers are currently sprouting, and into the entire catchment area for the subways - including the quiet neighbourhoods, whose residents want none of it.

But for the people, like Bradley, who bought a home to be on the subway, the subway means one thing: a way to get downtown - the real downtown.

"The state of transit in Toronto is a joke. I mean, it's the biggest city in Canada; if you don't live on the subway line, you can't get anywhere."
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Old November 30th, 2007, 10:39 PM   #524
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Dianne Braun, who lives in a condo near Bayview Ave. and Sheppard, says the subway is a pleasant amenity - but she doesn't use it. She drives to her job as an executive assistant even though her office is right on the subway, too, at Yonge and Eglinton.
$10 bucks says she would be able to get to her work about 10 times faster at rush hour on the subway than by driving, save a ton in gas too.

Anyways, they should not have built Bessarion, and instead built a station at Willowdale Ave, or even closer to Yonge St. This I think would have spread out downtown North York into an actual area, rather than simply a strip.

Also, allow metropass or even free parking at Don Mills station. This would be great for car commuters from Aurora, Newmarket, Georgina, etc. where taking the Viva or driving to Finch or York Mills may not be practical (if you are to drive to Leslie to park, you might as well drive to York Mills and skip the transfer).

And of course, Eglinton or a DLR would have made much more sense than Sheppard.

(How Harris got re-elected is totally beyond me)
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Old November 30th, 2007, 11:20 PM   #525
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Also, if they had designed it as a branch of the Yonge line from downtown Toronto, it would have made so much more sense than to make passengers transfer needlessly, not to mention help relieve congestion on the Yonge line through midtown.
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Old December 1st, 2007, 06:56 AM   #526
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And of course, Eglinton or a DLR would have made much more sense than Sheppard.

(How Harris got re-elected is totally beyond me)
Yep. Nooo contest. How did he get re-elected? One number: 905.

I have proposed incorporating Sheppard into a DRL in other threads, turning it south along Vic Park until Eglinton Square area, then swinging through Flemingdon Park and Pape Village on the way to downtown along Richmond and Adelaide (and reconnecting to the B-D at Dundas West). This would see its ridership skyrocket since it would allow it to be used as a transfer-free access into downtown along many locations that are popular but not serviced directly by Yonge.
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Old December 1st, 2007, 07:00 AM   #527
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Also, if they had designed it as a branch of the Yonge line from downtown Toronto, it would have made so much more sense than to make passengers transfer needlessly, not to mention help relieve congestion on the Yonge line through midtown.
There was a reason for this: Finch Station alone sees twice as many rides as the entire Sheppard Line.

The infrastructure is already designed in a way that would allow Sheppard trains to run directly through on the Yonge, so it is not a question of it not being designed to do so. It is an operations decision to keep as many trains going to Finch as possible. The math would certainly suggest that this is a smart move.
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Old December 1st, 2007, 12:29 PM   #528
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(How Harris got re-elected is totally beyond me)
Harris got re-elected for 3 reasons. The 905 area, as TRZ mentioned...the fact that there was very little strong opposition against him...and because people were shell-shocked...here was a politician who actually did what he said he was going to do...cut spending even (especially?) if it hurt people...some people wanted to see what he would do next....

Reminds me of the Simpsons again

Mayor Quimby: "I cant stand you people, you're all crazy"
Springfield resident: "Give us hell, Mayor! Wooo hoo!"

Cheers, m
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Old December 1st, 2007, 12:49 PM   #529
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some people wanted to see what he would do next....
It's the same reason people who hate Howard Stern listen to his show more on average than people who love him.
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Old December 1st, 2007, 01:51 PM   #530
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$10 bucks says she would be able to get to her work about 10 times faster at rush hour on the subway than by driving, save a ton in gas too.

Anyways, they should not have built Bessarion, and instead built a station at Willowdale Ave, or even closer to Yonge St. This I think would have spread out downtown North York into an actual area, rather than simply a strip.

Also, allow metropass or even free parking at Don Mills station. This would be great for car commuters from Aurora, Newmarket, Georgina, etc. where taking the Viva or driving to Finch or York Mills may not be practical (if you are to drive to Leslie to park, you might as well drive to York Mills and skip the transfer).

(How Harris got re-elected is totally beyond me)
1. When you get a chance to drive on Shapperd Ave. from Bayview to Younge St. at anytime, you'll realize that there is no such thing as rush hour traffic.

2. Bessarion station was built for the Canadian Tire/shopping complex and future development. Also to shorten the gap between Bayview and Leslie, which is much larger than Bayview and Younge. Plus, a station at willowdale would be too close to Younge to be justifiable. There is a cost issue involved.

3. Don Mills station is built on top of Fairview mall, there are planty of parking spaces there. There are usually always spaces near the TTC entrance. Otherthan that, there are no other parking locations around Don Mills station.
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Old December 1st, 2007, 06:57 PM   #531
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Also to shorten the gap between Bayview and Leslie, which is much larger than Bayview and Younge. Plus, a station at willowdale would be too close to Younge to be justifiable. There is a cost issue involved.
Incorrect. The distance between Bayview and Leslie is comparable to Bayview and Yonge's distance - while it is true that Bayview to Leslie is longer, it is not by a wide margin. Willowdale has no spacing issues as it would be about equal to the distance from Bessarion to the next station in either direction. Willowdale would frankly have had more value than Bessarion in terms of ridership since Willowdale is a far more recognized street and holds more activity potential than Bessarion. While stations are indeed expensive and the costs must be evaluated, if Bessarion made the cut, one wonders how Willowdale didn't, particularly since there is some recongizable commercial activity in the area of Willowdale and Sheppard.

Also, it is spelled Yonge, not Younge.
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Old December 1st, 2007, 10:46 PM   #532
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1. When you get a chance to drive on Shapperd Ave. from Bayview to Younge St. at anytime, you'll realize that there is no such thing as rush hour traffic.

2. Bessarion station was built for the Canadian Tire/shopping complex and future development. Also to shorten the gap between Bayview and Leslie, which is much larger than Bayview and Younge. Plus, a station at willowdale would be too close to Younge to be justifiable. There is a cost issue involved.

3. Don Mills station is built on top of Fairview mall, there are planty of parking spaces there. There are usually always spaces near the TTC entrance. Otherthan that, there are no other parking locations around Don Mills station.
1. Even if that stretch has little traffic, getting from Yonge to Eglinton is a nightmare, especially compared to the subway underground. Even if she took Bayview to Eglinton and across, Eglinton's traffic into midtown is hardly an open road.

2. See TRZ's post. Besides that, I think the higher density of stations contrasting with the lower density would help to widen downtown North York from more than a mere strip, and help to extend it along Sheppard Ave. Kenneth or Dudley might even be a little better, as they would help to minimize a "dead zone" between stations.

3. Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't Fairview Mall's parking open at 10AM, making it useless for 9-5 commuters?
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Old December 1st, 2007, 11:18 PM   #533
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1. Even if that stretch has little traffic, getting from Yonge to Eglinton is a nightmare, especially compared to the subway underground. Even if she took Bayview to Eglinton and across, Eglinton's traffic into midtown is hardly an open road.

2. See TRZ's post. Besides that, I think the higher density of stations contrasting with the lower density would help to widen downtown North York from more than a mere strip, and help to extend it along Sheppard Ave. Kenneth or Dudley might even be a little better, as they would help to minimize a "dead zone" between stations.

3. Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't Fairview Mall's parking open at 10AM, making it useless for 9-5 commuters?
1. I don't know enough about Yonge St. during rush hours, but I do know that the sectino from the 401 all he way down to Lawrance is a breeze. So anyways, the speeds are probabley comparable, and she's just lazy and likes her car.

2. Each side as its arguments, but i hold that the people who made the decisions for the TTC are smart people who knows more than us. I'm not going to second guess on their choice of locations. After all, we don't know what's going to come 10-15 years from now, but they have an idea.

3. Fairview Mall's parking don't close. The mall opens at 10, parking doesn't have a gate. At least non that I know of.
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Old December 2nd, 2007, 04:33 AM   #534
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2. Each side as its arguments, but i hold that the people who made the decisions for the TTC are smart people who knows more than us. I'm not going to second guess on their choice of locations. After all, we don't know what's going to come 10-15 years from now, but they have an idea.
The people at the TTC are smart people indeed, but building the Sheppard subway was not a decision made by the TTC, it was forced to build it by Mel Lastman and Council at the time, in conjunction with Mel's salvaging the project from Mike The Knife. If only the former borough of York made some noise, but no signs of opposition came from them, and the Eg was buried. Mel Lastman among other politicians shoved Sheppard down the TTC's throat. They know jack about what they are doing. The TTC did not want it. It is all politics screwing things up. Mel Lastman is not a smart person, not even close. Many people on this forum, myself included, know more about what's good for the TTC better than Mel Lastman. Mel Lastman was only after his wet-dream of NYCC becoming the next Union Station, without a care in the world about the impacts of his selfish stupidity would be on the rest of the TTC and city.
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Old December 2nd, 2007, 04:44 AM   #535
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The people at the TTC are smart people indeed, but building the Sheppard subway was not a decision made by the TTC, it was forced to build it by Mel Lastman and Council at the time, in conjunction with Mel's salvaging the project from Mike The Knife. If only the former borough of York made some noise, but no signs of opposition came from them, and the Eg was buried. Mel Lastman among other politicians shoved Sheppard down the TTC's throat. They know jack about what they are doing. The TTC did not want it. It is all politics screwing things up. Mel Lastman is not a smart person, not even close. Many people on this forum, myself included, know more about what's good for the TTC better than Mel Lastman. Mel Lastman was only after his wet-dream of NYCC becoming the next Union Station, without a care in the world about the impacts of his selfish stupidity would be on the rest of the TTC and city.
North Yorker loved him.

And in all fairness, Mel was hoping that the province or Ottawa will kick in the funding for the remainder of the line to Scarb Town Center, which at that point will make alot of sense.

It was a very good plan, the onlything that didn't work out is that everybody in Queen's park and above hated Mel's guts, so he couldn't get any money from anybody.

Which is the same problem with Miller's government ATM, which is NDP leaning. Toronto just hasn't been in luck when it comes to ties with upper level governments.
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Old December 2nd, 2007, 04:54 AM   #536
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3. Fairview Mall's parking don't close. The mall opens at 10, parking doesn't have a gate. At least non that I know of.
The Don Mills station at Fairview Mall has also sparked further controversy because the commuter lot requires a fee even if one holds a monthly Metropass transit pass; the parking charge was required in order to prevent the limited garage space from being overwhelmed (the regular mall parking is cordoned off until the shopping centre opens).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheppard_subway

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Old December 2nd, 2007, 05:15 AM   #537
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North Yorker loved him.
And that makes everything so much better

Doesn't change the fact that he was a senile retard.

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Originally Posted by UD2 View Post
And in all fairness, Mel was hoping that the province or Ottawa will kick in the funding for the remainder of the line to Scarb Town Center, which at that point will make alot of sense.
The more this is closely looked at, the more it seems to be a stretch. I used to think that an STC extension would make it prove its worth, but I have doubts now after taking a closer look at various elements of the picture, particularly at the reality of the state of the corridor today - as a corridor, it is extremely weak and not worth a subway, period. Sheppard Subway should never have been built. Two hub termini alone do not a good subway make.

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It was a very good plan,
No, it wasn't, because it was shoved down people's throats when there were much higher priorities in this city that needed the attention (Eg) far more than Sheppard - Sheppard actually didn't need subway attention at all (LRT would have been plenty for the corridor), and that's the critical failing point of this plan.
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Old December 2nd, 2007, 11:05 PM   #538
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And that makes everything so much better

Doesn't change the fact that he was a senile retard.

The more this is closely looked at, the more it seems to be a stretch. I used to think that an STC extension would make it prove its worth, but I have doubts now after taking a closer look at various elements of the picture, particularly at the reality of the state of the corridor today - as a corridor, it is extremely weak and not worth a subway, period. Sheppard Subway should never have been built. Two hub termini alone do not a good subway make.


No, it wasn't, because it was shoved down people's throats when there were much higher priorities in this city that needed the attention (Eg) far more than Sheppard - Sheppard actually didn't need subway attention at all (LRT would have been plenty for the corridor), and that's the critical failing point of this plan.
Different planning philsophies, Sheppard line serves the people in the burbs, while Eglinton serves the city. there's gonna be the argument that why serve future development while the current ones are left unmet, but here is why.

It was redundent to build a line at Eglinton because the bus lines that run on the road would have to run anyways. Not just the 34 Eglinton East, but also the 100 Flemington Park, 51 Leslie, 54 Lawrance East, and the 56 (I forgot where). You can't build a Eglinton line without significant desruptions to existing travel patterns, where as a Sheppard line only affects the 84 Sheppard.

Plus, the Sheppard line have brought great convinence to me, (I live on Leslie and York Mills), and I thank the mayor for that.

Again, as silly and stupid you think Mel Lastman is, he was still mayor of North York and then Toronto for over a decade. I'm not going to second guess him on whatever his plans are, and I don't believe he's dumb.

Maybe once you become mayor, I'll realize that I was mistaken =-)
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Old December 4th, 2007, 04:10 AM   #539
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Different planning philsophies, Sheppard line serves the people in the burbs, while Eglinton serves the city. there's gonna be the argument that why serve future development while the current ones are left unmet, but here is why.

It was redundent to build a line at Eglinton because the bus lines that run on the road would have to run anyways. Not just the 34 Eglinton East, but also the 100 Flemington Park, 51 Leslie, 54 Lawrance East, and the 56 (I forgot where). You can't build a Eglinton line without significant desruptions to existing travel patterns, where as a Sheppard line only affects the 84 Sheppard.

Plus, the Sheppard line have brought great convinence to me, (I live on Leslie and York Mills), and I thank the mayor for that.

Again, as silly and stupid you think Mel Lastman is, he was still mayor of North York and then Toronto for over a decade. I'm not going to second guess him on whatever his plans are, and I don't believe he's dumb.

Maybe once you become mayor, I'll realize that I was mistaken =-)
`North York Mayor Mel Lastman says the (Sheppard) route should be rejected because it would spell an end to many of the quiet, residential neighbourhoods lining Sheppard Avenue. Instead, he says, Metro should ease traffic congestion for commuters heading downtown by building a transit line next to the Don Valley Parkway.'

...

The Downtown line was criticized for "focusing development pressure on the core (which) would violate Metro's strategy of decentralizing office growth and throw a wrench into North York's plan for a satellite downtown of office towers and high-rise housing in the Yonge Street-Sheppard Avenue Area".

...

Had the Bill Davis Conservatives remained in Queens Park a year longer, this plan might have become reality. Ever since the opening of the Yonge Subway in 1954, Conservative governments of the day had provided strong support to the TTC and its major capital projects. However, the release of Network 2011 coincided with the defeat of the Conservatives and the formation of the first Liberal government in 42 years. The Liberals, wary of the $5 billion price tag attached to Network 2011, put the plan under review. Infuriatingly, it was at this time that Highway 407 received provincial funds and took the first steps towards construction.


http://transit.toronto.on.ca/subway/5111.shtml

So Mel was AGAINST the Sheppard line, Toronto was focused on developing suburbs rather than downtown, and the CONSERVATIVES were for transit while the LIBERALS were for suburban highways?!?

25 years ago, I think Toronto was stuck in Bizarro World or something
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You are genius too Electrify, never would have thought of this if not for your thread.
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Old December 4th, 2007, 07:06 AM   #540
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I think the Sheppard line is a complete failure.
It would be an effective transit corridor if it went anywhere but it doesn't. If it went to STC in the east and joined up with the Spadina ext or preferably the coming Jane LRT.
Now all it will do is slow people down from getting from one end of North York to the other.
Going from Malvern to YorkU will now require LRT to DonMills then Sheppard line to Yonge then transfer to a bus to Spadina and then head north.
It will be slow, tiresome, and require endless transfers. Thios is exactly the thing that inhibits people from taking transit. This kind of a thing not only makes transit slower but is also viewed as "work" by its patrons.

Reconfigure TransitCity so that the Sheppard Line is transfered to LRT and goes to Jane to make it a true rapid transit corridor. It would be a crosstown LRT line and be truly rapid. You can have all the rapid transit systems in the world but if they are short with endless transfers to other lines the patron gets tired and the ride is anything but rapid.
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