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Old November 1st, 2011, 03:42 PM   #41
Satyricon84
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Sisimiut

It is a town in central-western Greenland, located on the coast of Davis Strait, approximately 320 km north of Nuuk and 75 km north of the Arctic Circle. It is the second-largest town in Greenland, with a population of 5,500 inhabitants.
Roads in Sisimiut, including the road to the airport, are surfaced, but there is no road linking Sisimiut to any other settlement. In the 2000s construction of the 170 km road to Kangerlussuaq was discussed for several years without resolution.The road would have been the first of its kind in Greenland, connecting two settlements, and reducing the need for passenger exchange at Kangerlussuaq Airport, the Air Greenland hub. The town has its own bus network. In winter dog sled routes are a key transport link to settlements further north.





The road to Sisimiut Airport, Sisimiut, Kangerluarsunnguaq Bay, Nasaasaaq, and Amerloq Fjord seen from Palasip Qaqqaa.




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Old November 1st, 2011, 04:10 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Comfortably Numb View Post
This must be the most northerly Spar in the world?
Maybe this one?

http://maps.google.no/maps?q=freidig...nmark&t=m&z=14

Nice to see so much development in Nuuk. Those commieblocks will be demolished during next year i think.
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Old November 1st, 2011, 04:38 PM   #43
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Kangerlussuaq road sign (The one hidden by Tokyo is Rome)

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Old November 1st, 2011, 05:02 PM   #44
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Kangerlussuaq main street...



..and with the sunset
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Old November 1st, 2011, 09:59 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diablo234 View Post
Well it is a dependency of Denmark.
Well yes but most of the people there are not ethnic Danes and have their own language, with Danish being second. As a result I was expecting most signs, stores, etc to be actually in their language instead of Danish.
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Old November 1st, 2011, 10:06 PM   #46
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I think that ethic Danes are less likely to speak local languages and locals more likely to speak Danish, so it might make more scene.

I might be wrong though
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Old November 2nd, 2011, 01:15 AM   #47
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other pics here:
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Ca...t_in_Greenland

Interesting thread, pics from remote, unknown, mysterious and exotic countries are IMHO more interesting that many from well-known places.
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Old November 2nd, 2011, 01:25 AM   #48
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There are some Scottish photos on there (wikipedia commons, road photos)
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Old November 2nd, 2011, 02:15 AM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Satyricon84 View Post
There's a Petro Canada sales office in Nuuk? That's something I wasn't expecting. Then again, given the close proximity to Canada, I probably shouldn't be surprised.

These are really neat pics. I'd like to see some of the only road tunnel in the country (It's in Nuuk).
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Old November 2nd, 2011, 02:19 AM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fargo Wolf View Post
There's a Petro Canada sales office in Nuuk? That's something I wasn't expecting. Then again, given the close proximity to Canada, I probably shouldn't be surprised.

These are really neat pics. I'd like to see some of the only road tunnel in the country (It's in Nuuk).
I think a lot (most?) of Greenland's trade is with North America, and that is why they voted to leave the European Community in the 1980s, because they were afraid it would interfere with that trade.

Great pictures, I'd never really thought about what a Greenlandic town might look like before!
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Old November 2nd, 2011, 02:44 AM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fargo Wolf View Post
I'd like to see some of the only road tunnel in the country (It's in Nuuk).
As you wish

The road before the tunnel with the shypyard on the background


Here the entrance towards marina
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Old November 2nd, 2011, 02:59 AM   #52
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Some other pics of the tunnel, both entrances



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Old November 2nd, 2011, 03:44 AM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ed110220 View Post
I think a lot (most?) of Greenland's trade is with North America, and that is why they voted to leave the European Community in the 1980s, because they were afraid it would interfere with that trade.

Great pictures, I'd never really thought about what a Greenlandic town might look like before!
I was about to comment on the Petro-Canada sign, as well. My understanding is that CBC North (both radio and TV services) are also available in Greenland...? But, what I do find curious, given Greenland's location, is the lack of American vehicles on the road. One would think, like the French islands of St. Pierre & Miquelon, or even as seen in Iceland, there would be more.

Awesome pix, BTW!

~BG
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Old November 2nd, 2011, 03:45 AM   #54
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Narsaq

It is a town of 1,800 inhabitants in southern Greenland located in Tunulliarfik Fjord. In contrast to the rest of Greenland, the wider Narsaq area has a relatively extensive network of traversable dirt and gravel roads, totalling over 120 kilometers and requiring DKK 500,000 annually for service. The longest stretch of road envelopes the northern end of Tunulliarfik Fjord, and connects the sheep farms of Qassiarsuk with the airport of Narsarsuaq. The roads are generally of poor construction, lacking crossfall for drainage, and using softer sandstone instead of harder granite, creating severe dust problems in the summer. For general transportation all-terrain vehicles are recommended. During winter dog sled routes are important transport links to the surrounding area.











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Old November 2nd, 2011, 04:17 AM   #55
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Relevant information for road-building projects in Greenland

We have selected some reports that are relevant for Greenland from ROAdEx┤s large
archive of published material. The following reports are particularly relevant:
• Dealing with bearing capacity problems on low volume roads constructed on peat
• *)Drainage on low traffic volume roads
• Structural innovations
• *)Managing spring thaw weakening on low volume roads
• *)Permanent deformation
• Road management policies for low volume roads – some proposals
*) These reports have been translated to Greenlandic and Danish and distributed
at ARTEK┤s road conference in march 2007. Contributions at the conference were
provided by colleagues that are not members of the ROAdEx cooperation.

A. drainage
The ROAdEx reports on drainage are very relevant for road construction in Greenland.
The nature of the problem and a summary of the reports is given below:
“drainage on low volume roads
Water has a key role when discussing the mechanical performance and lifetime
of any traffic infrastructure. The fact, known for centuries, is that as long as road
structures and sub-grade soil do not have excess water the road will work well. But
increased water content reduces the bearing capacity of a soil, which will increase
the rate of deterioration and shorten the lifetime of the road. In such cases, the road
will need rehabilitation more often than a well-drained road structure. When selecting
maintenance strategies the paving costs in the maintenance of the road surface need
to be compared with the costs of maintaining or improving the drainage. This analysis
very challenging in the Northern Periphery because the problem is more complex in
cold areas since the freeze-thaw cycles affect moisture content to a much greater
extent than elsewhere.
In the ROADEX pilot project 1998-2001 drainage problems were identified to be one
of the greatest problems shared by all of the ROAdEx partner Road regions. Funding
for road condition management has been decreasing in all of the countries participating
in the ROAdEx project for several years and as a result basic drainage maintenance
tasks, such as ditch and culvert cleaning, as well as tasks related to the drainage
system in general, are neglected since there are considered low on the list of priorities.
Instead of drainage maintenance, the priority tasks have been those that are more
important to the road user in the short term i.e. repaving and snow removal.
This report concentrates on presenting the problems that inadequate drainage causes
for low volume roads in the NP area of Europe. It also discusses the monitoring
methods that can be used when evaluating the drainage condition and proposes
possible improvement techniques for different drainage problems. In addition, the
effects of drainage on the pavement lifetime and life cycle costs of the pavement
structure have been studied and are part of the report. The original report contains
an extensive literature review on the moisture-content in the road structure, together
with the relationship between moisture-content and the characteristics of unbound
granular materials and sub-grade soils.
Similar experiences have been made outside the ROAdEx cooperation. Two articles
that describe the situation in Iceland were presented at ARTEK┤s road conference in
march 2007. These examples are considered relevant for comparison with Southern
Greenland, i.e. areas without permafrost.
ARTEK investigations in Southern Greenland confirm that
drainage of roads is a considerable problem that requires annual maintenance.

B. Freeze-thaw problems with moisture-sensitive materials
Not all types of soil and rock materials present the same problems regarding moisture.
ROAdEx┤s experience with the treatment of water-sensitive materials is reproduced
below:

“Treatment of moisture-Susceptible Aggregates
Seasonal changes and freeze-thaw cycles are the most significant factors that
contribute to the loss of bearing capacity of moisture-susceptible materials in cold
climates. The deterioration is caused by excess water that has accumulated in the road
structure and cannot escape from the layers as the structure thaws. As a result, the
road may quickly be damaged by heavy traffic.
material treatment of the road structure can be used to keep water away from the
moisture-susceptible materials.
If water is scarce in the structural layer before and during the freezing period, the layer does not usually create ice lenses.
Even during the thawing period in the spring the layer will work as designed and spread the load across
a wider area so that the road will have a better durability against traffic loads.
Traditional stabilizers, such as bitumen and cement, are generally used to make a
significant improvement to the strength and stiffness of the treated layers. However,
these techniques require large quantities of stabilization agents to be used and thus
the treatment methods are usually uneconomical on low volume roads. New types of
stabilization agents have been developed to reduce the moisture-susceptibility and
to improve the low bearing capacitates due to seasonal changes. These new agents,
usually called non-traditional stabilization agents, are aimed for road materials whose
bearing capacity and strength are sufficient, except for the short-term, but nevertheless
significant, losses of bearing capacity relate to seasonal changes.
This report concentrates on presenting the types of information and investigations that
are needed when using stabilization agents to reduce the moisture-susceptibility of the
materials in the structural layers of the road. An essential part of the report is to clarify
and even simplify the process of how information can be used and utilized. Since the
research project concentrates primarily on low volume roads in the Northern Periphery
of the European union, the report aims to focus on cost-effective investigation and
information gathering methods.
When reading the report one should bear in mind that a complex combination of factors
affects the water flow and its impact in different aggregates and weather conditions.
The mixing of stabilization agents will complicate the situation so that they may be
used in inappropriate places if their combined behaviour is not known well enough.
Especially important is research on non-traditional stabilization agents since until now
there is no reliable information available about their long-term performance in road
structures.”

“design and Repair of Roads Suffering Spring Thaw Weakening
Seasonal changes, freeze-thaw cycles and the damage they cause are the most
significant factors affecting the road condition of northern cold climate road networks in
Europe, Asia and North America. Freeze-thaw processes also cause major problems
in high areas in countries with warmer climates. In the united States, the AASHO
research program studied the appearance of pavement distress during different
seasons (White and Goree 1990) and, according to the results, 60% of the distresses
appeared during the springtime when the relative amount of traffic was 24%. During
the summer time the relative amount of new pavement damage was only 2% when the
relative traffic amount was 30%.
Frost damage is evident in roads as uneven frost heave and longitudinal and
transverse cracking, but above all as softening of the road structure and permanent
deformation during the thawing period. In the worst scenario, driving on these
roads can be impossible. Thaw-weakening damage is usually the biggest problem on “unbuilt” gravel roads, but it also causes major problems on paved roads, and
especially on weak roads with a surface dressing pavement.
depending on the scale and scope of the spring thaw-weakening problem there are
several policies and techniques for managing a road during the weak period. In general
the management tools can be divided into:
1) different maintenance techniques to reduce the effect of spring thaw
2) load restrictions and different tools to minimize the problems caused by these
restrictions
3) strengthening weak road sections to the extent that load restrictions can be removed
or used only in extreme conditions and
4) co-operation with transportation organizations using heavy vehicles.
Traditionally road administrators have endeavoured to prevent spring thaw damage
by implementing load restrictions or even closing the road. The use of spring load
restrictions increases the pavement lifetime but at the same time load restriction
measures also incur major extra costs for industries using heavy transport vehicles. For
instance, the extra costs to the forest industry due to spring thaw-weakening in Finland
has been calculated to be 100m€, of which 65 m€ comes from public roads.

The best and most sustainable solution for managing thaw-weakening problems is
therefore to strengthen and rehabilitate the weak road sections. However, this can,
and should, only be done if the road region has enough resources to take appropriate
measures that will function over the long term. major mistakes have been made
when road sections have been strengthened using structures that are too weak.
These problems become especially apparent if the road is paved afterwards.”

C. Road construction over Peat
There are extensive peat deposits in Greenland, even though their thicknesses are
small compared with those in countries with warmer and moister climates.
ROAdEx┤s report “managing Peat Related Problems on Low Volume Roads” explain
the nature of the problems and indicate technical solutions.
“Road Construction over Peat
The construction and maintenance of roads over peat tends to be considered as a
“black art” by many engineers. As a consequence a great number of engineers, without
peat experience, tend to avoid construction risk and opt for safer, more conservative
forms of construction whereby any peat found on the route of a road is totally removed and replaced with clean, sound, road foundation material. This practice, however,
ignores some very good practices, developed over long periods of time in northern
latitudes and is an expensive solution, as well as being a primary user of scarce natural
resources, and only really affordable in the construction of high speed national roads.
Lower classes of roads, and particularly low volume roads, can realize real benefits
from retaining peat as a sub-grade (benefits such as economy, environmental
sustainability, lesser use of materials, etc.) and develop more cost-effective and sitespecific solutions than simply always digging out the material and throwing it away.
This is especially the case in rehabilitation projects of roads “floating” on peat where it
is unlikely that a simple solution of full excavation, a re-alignment or a local diversion is
possible. If it was, the original designers of the road should probably have done it in the
first place.
decreasing national roads budgets, and the need to get more road kilometers per
Euro, now provide the impetus for conservative construction practices to be reexamined. The bearing capacity problems of roads over peat were identified as a
common problem across the Northern Periphery in the ROAdEx pilot project and
the subsequent ROAdEx II report “dealing with bearing capacity problems on low
volume roads constructed on peat” (munro 2005) reviewed the state of the art in road
construction over peat in the partner areas.
This report will look at the difficulties of rehabilitating existing roads over peat, primarily
the so-called “floating” roads”, and discuss how modern survey, monitoring and
construction practices can assist engineers in assessing and evaluating problem roads
sections that “fit for purpose” solutions can be developed and implemented without the
need to resort to excavation on all occasions.
The report will summarize the main issues to be considered when planning these types
of works and offer guidance to recognizable problems where possible. Its aim will be to
be a practical guide for the local road maintenance engineer/designer that can be used
to address the common problems raised by roads over peat sub-grades.“

D. Environment
Environmental considerations play an ever-increasing role, also for road construction.
The ROAdEx reports “Environmental guidelines” provide good advice and an overview
of potential problems. The nature of problems varies from those experienced in the
construction phase when landscape and cultural aspects can be involved, to the
operation phase when emissions from vehicles, dust problems etc. can be relevant. A
summary of the report mentioned above is given here:
“Environmental Guidelines
Growing interest in the environment in modern society has led to increasing focus
on environmental issues. This also applies to the road sector. By its very nature, this
sector involves appreciable loading on the environment, so there is every reason
to take active measures to achieve more environmentally sustainable operations.
Appreciable gains can be made, both environmentally and also economically.
The major environmental loading from the road sector originates principally from
exhaust gases and emissions from road traffic, although road building, rebuilding and
maintenance of the road network can also cause significant environmental impact in
certain cases.
This report deals only with those elements involved in the construction and
maintenance of road objects.
This report is aimed at giving an overview of how the project partners deal with
environmental matters in road building, and to give advice on how good environmental
management can be assured in road building. The report is based on contacts with the
various road authorities concerned, and also a number of reports.
A short checklist for use on site accompanies the report. This guideline is a brief
compilation of various items of advice that have been developed in chapter three of this
report and is intended for use by persons on site.”

E. Permafrost and climate changes
It is generally difficult to build a road on sediments that are subjected to permafrost.
drainage from the active layer (that melts in the summer) is one of the problems.
The climatic changes in recent years have altered the stability conditions for the
permanently frozen layer in many places. There were several contributions that
addressed this problem at ARTEK┤s road conference. These include a contribution
from Arctic Canada on methods for removal of water from sensitive road constructions.
There were three contributions from Greenland on the decay of permafrost and
mapping methods. Surface materials with light colours appear to have a positive effect.
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Old November 2nd, 2011, 09:58 AM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tincap View Post
But, what I do find curious, given Greenland's location, is the lack of American vehicles on the road. One would think, like the French islands of St. Pierre & Miquelon, or even as seen in Iceland, there would be more.

Awesome pix, BTW!

~BG
Yes, Greenland is a part of North America, not Europe. Allthough it belongs to Denmark which is situated in Europe. So it's a danish autonomous overseas territory.

The vehicles of Greenland seem to be bigger than the ones in Denmark, more SUV's and pickup trucks. DK-cars are usually smaller like vw golf, ford focus.

Also in Sweden: the further north you travel the bigger the cars, in the north there are more space, less traffic, but the roads are of poorer standard, longer distances, which makes those type of cars more useful.

As seen on pictures of Iceland, their favorite vehicles are japanese/koreanmade jeeps like the Toyota Landcruiser.
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Old November 2nd, 2011, 03:34 PM   #57
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Miscellaneous pictures of Nuuk

Downtown


Italian tourists waiting to board on the cruise


Block P


Industrivej with Nuussuaq and Mount Sermitsiaq on the background


Work in progress for the extension of the power plant




Qinngorput


Hangars in Nuuk airport seen from the skilift


Lake in Nuussuaq


At the harbor


Wrecks at Vestervig


Skilift seen from the airport


Supermarket in downtown Nuuk


Tuapannguits Towers


The harbor


Multi hall in Nuuk


Nuuk steam laundry


Roundabout in Nuuk


Aqqusinersuaq seen from the roundabout


Health center


Kongevej overlooking Fjeldvej in the background


Sports cafe


Nuuk centrum


Banknordik


Fox Valley (RŠvedalen)




The old printing house


Maik's Corner


Queen Ingrid's Hospital


Jens Kreutzmannip Aqq.


New buildings seen from Queen Ingrid's Hospital










House and restaurant in the colonial port


"quay" for cruises




Santa's mailbox


The tunnel which links Nuuk to marina




The road from Qinngorput to Nuussuaq


Qinngorput




New buildings in Nuussuaq






Downtown
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Old November 2nd, 2011, 04:04 PM   #58
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New buildings in Nuuk reminds me of modern Icelandic buildings. Nice!
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Old November 2nd, 2011, 04:27 PM   #59
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Driving in Nuuk





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Old November 2nd, 2011, 04:31 PM   #60
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Driving a dumper in Sisimiut

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