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Old November 3rd, 2011, 07:16 AM   #1
Ginkgo
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Seattle: The Big Green

I like to call Seattle the "Big Green" for obvious reasons. Formally known as the Emerald City. Previously known as the Jet City and before that the Queen City. Also referred to as Seatown. Perhaps the more knicknames a city has, the better? I took a walk through part of the Queen Anne neighborhood, most of which sits on the slopes of or atop Queen Anne Hill. Like all older districts of the city, it has an amazing collection of homes of all architectural styles, and some of them very large (at least for Seattle). It was a beautiful autumn day, so I tried to capture some of the dazzling fall color. I started the walk climbing up the hill from the back side (north) at the canal which separates city in half.

Fremont, north of the Ship Canal, in the background












Queen Anne Avenue, the main business steet atop the hill.




Queen Anne Presbyterian Church




Queen Anne Baptist Church


Seattle winters are mild enough to allow fig trees to prosper uncovered






In the middle of the hill amongst densely packed homes is a very deep, steep ravine that could never be built on. A little wilderness in the heart of QA




Besides fantastic homes there are a number of nice-looking apartment houses on the hill








Queen Anne Playfield
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Old November 3rd, 2011, 02:04 PM   #2
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Beautiful colours in a beautiful city Thanks for sharing
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Old November 4th, 2011, 05:43 PM   #3
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Great pics !
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Old November 4th, 2011, 08:56 PM   #4
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More from Queen Anne:









One or two varieties of palm can also survive our winters




Staircases lace hillier neighborhoods of the city: at street ends, between streets and where streets do not exist. They make for easy climbing, are picturesque and can afford great views.






Parson's Garden, a favorite for springtime weddings






Viewpoint opposite the garden, looking toward the west: Puget Sound, Elliott Bay marina and the Magnolia Bridge, connecting the city to the Magnolia neighborhood


Too hazy to see the Olympic Mountains


Historical marker at the viewpoint




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Old November 4th, 2011, 11:21 PM   #5
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Beautiful city!
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Old November 6th, 2011, 03:53 AM   #6
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More from Queen Anne:

West Highland Drive




Newer construction but designed to "fit" into the ambiance that is West Highland Drive










In older parts of the city, especially Capitol Hill and Queene Anne Hill, some side streets still have their original cobblestone paving intact




















West Seattle in the distance, across Elliott Bay


Iconic view of the skyline from Kerry Park on West Highland Drive


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Old November 6th, 2011, 11:14 AM   #7
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Amazing photos from Seattle and thanks
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Old November 11th, 2011, 05:50 AM   #8
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There are many weekly neighborhood farmers markets in the city. Here are some pictures from the Ballard Sunday Market, on Ballard Avenue:











































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Old November 11th, 2011, 08:28 AM   #9
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Beautiful pics of Seattle....thanks for sharing.
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Old November 13th, 2011, 05:04 PM   #10
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Can't get enough of that city. Love it!
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Old November 14th, 2011, 03:51 AM   #11
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Beautiful city with beautiful houses. Thanks for the pics
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Old November 14th, 2011, 07:25 AM   #12
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Thanks to all for your much appreciated comments.

The other day, I took a walk to the Ballard Locks from my house in Ballard. Then today I walked from the locks to the Fremont Bridge on the Ballard and Fremont side (north), then crossed over to the Queen Anne and Magnolia side (south). Now and in coming days, I'll be posting pictures of this interesting part recreational, part maritime industrial area.

This map of the area was in the small museum at the locks:



Lawtonwood is an isolated residential area in the larger Magnolia neighborhood. It is surrounded by Salmon Bay where it enters into Puget Sound and by Discovery Park, the largest in Seattle:







Only seven bridges connect the two halves of Seattle--six for motor vehicular traffic and one--the westernmost--for rail traffic. Here is the daily long distance train from Chicago, minutes away from arrival at King Street Station just south of downtown Seattle, this after a nearly two day trip:





Native American art welcoming visitors to a small overlook at the Salmon Bay Natural area:







Entrance to the Ballard Locks, officially the [Hiram M.] Chittenden Locks, also sometimes referred to as the Government Locks. Competed in 1917, it allows for easy access for all types of watercraft--from commercial barges to yachts, from fishing boats to kayaks--between Lake Washington, which forms the eastern border of Seattle, Lake Union and the various bays (all fresh water) and Puget Sound, at sea level an inland arm of the Pacific Ocean:



Adjacent to the locks--and part of its territory--is a small but interesting park with plants from around the world, the work of largely one gardner, Charles English, for whom it is named:





Today I took good pictures of the large lock pumped out. Those pictures to follow



A little difficult to see from this angle, the plant design represents the symbol of the Army Corps of Engineers--a turreted castle. The corps built and still operates and maintains the locks. The Corps' motto is the French work "Essayons":





Not clear enough to read, but gives a good description of the workings of the locks to visitors:



Large lock, looking westward. Once a train passes over the bridge, it rises up so as to allow tall masted sailboats and larger vessels to pass under unencumbered:



The small lock, opening to receive eastbound shipping. Salt water in the lock is at sea level:



Past the gate, fresh water is at the higher level:



View across to the Magnolia (south) side:

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Old November 14th, 2011, 08:55 PM   #13
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Great thread Ginko!! I LOVE Seattle!
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Old November 14th, 2011, 11:51 PM   #14
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Some really great photos!
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Old November 15th, 2011, 02:23 AM   #15
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Very nice. And interesting to see that you have a couple of palm varieties.
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Old November 15th, 2011, 05:23 AM   #16
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Awesome thread!!! I love Seattle too and that's why I am living in Seattle! I love Ballard Farmer Market, I go there almost every Sunday.
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Old November 17th, 2011, 04:36 AM   #17
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I'm taking a short break from this miserable, dark, cold and rainy mid-autumn afternoon and retrieved some pictures from last summer of a cruise I took on Lake Union, right in the middle of Seattle, under cloudless skies. Until the Ship Canal was built in the early twentieth century, Lake Union was essentially landlocked. With the opening of the lock complex on the west end of the canal, ocean going ships could get at least as far inland as Lake Union and any number of maritime-related industries sprung up. Now the lake is mostly surrounded by residential (including house boats), high-tech and medical research, small businesses, parks and some remaining waterborne infrasturcture such as marinas and ship building businesses. At the south end of the lake is the Center for Wooden Boats (http://www.cwb.org), which has a wide variety of activities and classes to perpetuate the ancient craft of wooden boat building. It is from the CWF that we launched:


The white building in the center is the formal Naval Reserve Armory, currently being renovated as the new site of the city's Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI), due to open the end of 2012 For more information on this move go to http://www.seattlehistory.org. For a great picture of the last tall masted ship ever to pass out of Lake Union before such ships were forever prevented from re-entering see the opening page of that website (under Now Showing, Now and Then tab). As soon as the the last tall ship passed through, the missing part of the bridge deck was put into place:




Nearby is Kenmore Air sea airport. No exact "runway" as planes have to dodge boats and land/take off where they can do so in safety:


Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, one of the foremost such centers in the USA:






East slope of Queen Anne in background:






Eastlake neighborhood in background:


The former Lake Union steam plant, which was used to supplement power for the city during high demand times. Converted to use as a medical drug research center (ZymoGenetics, now a subsidiary of Novo Nordisk):




Aurora Bridge in the background--one of two high level bridges over the canal (which never have to open for ship traffic):


Low-level Fremont bridge can (barely) be discerned underneath the Aurora, actually just to the west of it:


Coming in for a smooth landing!:


Gas Works Park. Old derelict coal gasification plant had been abandoned for years. The area surround the works was cleaned of pollutants and a nice park was created. The ruins of the gas plant remain for viewing:


Lake Union houses two incredible houseboat communities, one on the east (Eastlake) side, on on the west (Queen Anne). These are not the original houseboats which largely served the poor classes. These modern (and in some cases renovated old) houses are prime real estate and very expensive. On my walk along the ship canal I found a throwback to that older era in a few relict houseboats (pictures to follow at a later date):








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Old November 17th, 2011, 09:30 PM   #18
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Love these pictures! Lake Union is one of best parts of Seattle area.
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Old November 18th, 2011, 05:28 AM   #19
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Heading out of Lake Union eastward. Closer up picture of the old coal gasification plant:


Ship Canal Bridge, carrying traffic on Interstate 5 (Canada to Mexico). The only bi-level bridge over the canal:


Old ferry boat undergoing some kind of work at dock:


Under Ship Canal Bridge with low-level University Bridge appoaching:




Mini-park in the shadow of the Ship Canal Bridge:


University Bridge opening:






Two bridges, a houseboat and some kayakers. Great summer scene:


Closing back down. The four low level bridges can open at all times except for morning and evening rush hours. During those times, it's the boats which have to wait, not the cars and buses:


The city's third major houseboat community in the Eastlake neighborhood on Portage Bay:


The University of Washington campus is huge. This is but a small sampling:


In the Montlake Cut, which, along with the Fremont Cut, was dug out deeply enough to allow for safe passage between Lakes Washington and Union and Puget Sound. The easternmost of the six bridges, the Montlake, appoaching:


Handsome control tower of the Montlake Bridge:






Eastern end of Montlake Cut. Union Bay up next with Lake Washington in background:
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Old November 23rd, 2011, 03:34 AM   #20
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It has been a miserable, rainy, cold and dark day, all the more reason to look back at summertime pictures.

Exiting the Montlake Cup eastward:


In Union Bay:




Foster Island was created in 1916 when the opening of the Ballard Locks lowered the level of Lake Washington (and adjacent Union Bay) by some nine feet, thus exposing new land. Foster Island is barely above water and remains swampy:






Appoaches to the Evergreen Point Floating Bridge (built on pontoons). The current bridge is coming to the end of its lifespan and its replacement is being planned:








The bridge spans Lake Washington and has two "highrises" on either end to allow boat passage. City of Bellevue in the distance:


Tip of Laurelhurst neighborhood on north side of Union Bay, Lake Washington beyond, with the city of Kirkland in the distance:


We entered Lake Washington and then turned around. The lake is large and forms the eastern boundary of Seattle and extends even farther north and south of the city:


More of Laurelhurst, a very upscale area:






Looking north in Union Bay toward the Union Bay Natural Area, a former landfill which has long since been cleaned up and, among others, used by the University of Washington for ecology research:


On the south side of Union Bay, the edge of the UW arboretum, which extends farther south and is worthy of a set of pictures itself:


Heading west back toward the Montlake Bridge:


Husky Stadium. Home of the mighty UW Huskies [American] football team. The stadium just closed for major renovations and will reopen in 2013:


Stadium with the UW small boat rental center. Lagoons and backwaters to the south and through the arboretum make for a pleasant day of boating activity:


Mini park at the eastern edge southside of the Montlake Cut with a ubiquitous totem pole:


Tradition of UW sports teams painting signs on the bulwarks of the Montlake Cut, only to fade with time and be replaced by another:








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