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Old December 16th, 2011, 11:26 PM   #41
sky-eye
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Nice city, thanks for posting.
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Old December 19th, 2011, 06:55 AM   #42
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More pictures from the Volunteer Park Conservatory:


































The conservatory's amorphophallus


























Holiday harp music a welcome treat:
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Old December 19th, 2011, 07:29 AM   #43
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Looks very nice and warm Whats the weather like outside these days...any snow?
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Old December 19th, 2011, 07:39 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aarhusforever View Post
Looks very nice and warm Whats the weather like outside these days...any snow?
Only eight hours of daylight this time of year, so when cloudy one doesn't get much vitamin D... We have had no snow yet. This December has actually been very dry so far--may end up the driest on record at this pace. Of late, lows general around 0C or 30F. Highs about 40-45F. Winter is of course a good time to get toasty in the conservatory. I have a few more pictures to post, including some gorgeous orchids.
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Old December 19th, 2011, 07:45 AM   #45
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Thanks for the info ..sounds like the weather in Aarhus right now
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Old December 21st, 2011, 01:21 AM   #46
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Some final pictures from the conservatory.
The bromeliad house contains the usual terrestrial bromeliads plus unusual ones including epiphytes (which get their moisture from the air) such as Spanish moss:











The main (palm) house has a nice collection of orchids:









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Old December 25th, 2011, 03:39 AM   #47
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I took a walk through downtown Seattle on a recent sunny day and here are some random pictures.

Iconic space needle:


New signs sprouting up in the city directing drivers to parking lots with spaces available:


Entrance to the new United States Courthouse:






Downtown has three or four "suburban type" enclosed malls. This is Pacific Place:




Rock formations outside the Washington State Convention Center, reminiscent of basalt columns in central Washington:






Wedged in the middle is 1201 Third Avenue, Seattle's second tallest building:




Two Union Square on right is Seattle's third tallest:


The new Central Library:




The former United States Courthouse:




Saved! This 1906 gem of a church (First Methodist) was slated for demolition. A last minute deal saved it and it is currently being used as a performing arts venue:


One ferry arriving, another departing:




Columbia Center, Seattle's tallest building at 968 feet (285 m), 76 floors.
Has observation deck on floor 73:




Seattle Municipal Tower, fourth tallest:




Seattle has many terra cotta-clad buildings:


New City Hall:


Iconic Smith Tower, Seattle's first skyscraper (1914) and tallest building in city for nearly 50 years (topped by Space Needle in 1962). Said to be tallest office building in world outside of New York City upon completion. In any event, quite an accomplishment at the time for an isolated, remote city. Open air observation deck on top and it still has manually operated elevators, rare indeed these days:

http://www.smithtower.com/









Pioneer Square, with its great 19th century stone and brick buildings, deserves a set of pictures, which I'll get to. This one was just renovated and awaiting tenants:


The airspace over an abandoned rail spur between two buildings was capped creating an indoor atrium:






One could be excused for thinking one was in the Cascade Mountains of Washington. In reality it is Waterfall Park in the heart of Pioneer Square:


It is located above the basement location where the United Parcel Service, UPS, was begun in 1907 and constructed thanks to the Casey Foundation, started by the founder of the company and siblings:

http://www.ups.com/content/corp/about/history/1929.html



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Old December 25th, 2011, 07:16 PM   #48
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Great pics , Ginkgo

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ginkgo View Post
Only eight hours of daylight this time of year, so when cloudy one doesn't get much vitamin D... We have had no snow yet. This December has actually been very dry so far--may end up the driest on record at this pace. Of late, lows general around 0C or 30F. Highs about 40-45F. Winter is of course a good time to get toasty in the conservatory. I have a few more pictures to post, including some gorgeous orchids.
One of my friends was in Seattle for the last three weeks and he found it very chilly . Of course , it was probably because he lives in Bangalore where low temperatures are averaging around 50-55 F right now....
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Old January 2nd, 2012, 07:40 PM   #49
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Seattle is somewhat unusual, at least in the western US, in that it had two major railroad stations. They are still extant (a minor miracle in itself), side-by-side, and both in various stages of renovation. Both front on Jackson Street at the boundary between Pioneer Square and the International District. Union Station, finished in 1911, was home to the Milwaukee Road and Union Pacific railroads. It was a stub station, tracks entering the station from the south, Milwaukee Road trains arriving from the Midwest via Snoqualmie Pass in the Cascade Mountains, UP trains from Portland and California. King Street Station (1906), just across Fourth Avenue, is a through station, which served the Great Northern and Northern Pacific railroads. Just north of the station is a one-mile tunnel underneath the downtown streets, still known as the Great Northern Tunnel, and whose northern portal is at about Virginia Street on the waterfront. In 1971, about the time when most passenger service in the US came under the auspices of Amtrak, trains forsook Union Station. The tracks were eventually removed and that area subsequently built upon. KSS continued to serve Amtrak. Union Station lay abandoned for some years, finally undergoing renovation work in the 1990's. It is now headquarters of Sound Transit, the agency which, among others, runs Sounder commuter trains out of KSS as well as Link light rail. Somewhat ironically, Central Link's International District/Chinatown station is right next to Union Station, so tracks once again run by the old edifice, if detached therefrom.







Union Station's Great Hall has not seen the likes of long distance passengers for decades, but has been lovingly restored and is can be rented out for events:




Our two stations together:


King Street Station's distinctive tower, a replica of the campanile di San Marco in Venice:











The cloth covering is part of the ongoing renovation of the grand old station and will of course be removed. Some unsightly communication dishes atop the pyramid have already been removed.


Some of the renovation work. This picture was taken in 2010 and work done on this side of the stations is now largely complete. I'll be taking more pictures as progess is made inside and out:





In the 1960's a most unfortunate "modernization" was visited upon the station. The ornate terra cotta ceiling was riddled with wiring to hang an acoustic panel faux ceiling and much of the terra cotta and marble walls were removed or covered over and original fixtures removed. This abomination is finally being corrected. Ongoing refurbishment of the station is proceeding, if slowly, as funding becomes available. Back in about 2006 a small section was renovated as a sign of what what to come. This is the so-called compass room after being restored. It is the King Street entrance to the station:



At least the mosaic tile floor throughout the waiting room area was left intact:




The original ceiling of the main waiting room will have to be patched, but will look wonderful when cleaned:







Recladded roof. These tiles have replaced the asphalt composite tiles which in turn had replaced the original clay tiles. Unbelievably, the same company which made the original tiles is still in existance (in Ohio, I believe) and was able to recreate the originals a century later:



New canopies covering the King Street side entrance:


I had the great fortune to finally be able to climb to the top of the tower. As part of the public outreach for the renovation, there was a tour of the tower, generally not open to the public due to safety and liability issues. It was a thrill to get to the top. Those pix to follow.
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Old January 3rd, 2012, 03:36 PM   #50
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Thank you very much for the info, my friend It was VERY interesting
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Old January 10th, 2012, 05:36 AM   #51
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I was finally able to realize a long-held wish: to climb the tower of King Street Station, normally closed to the public. As part of the ongoing renovation, such a tour was given a few months ago.

Starting the climb.





The tower once held ceiling-high, I'm told, stacks of old records from the legacy railroads--Great Northern and Northern Pacific. As you can see, the records are gone, having been removed for disposition of some sort:





Approaching the clock room:



Old stairs not for the faint of heart:



The four faces of the clock had been out or working order for years. As part of the renovation, master clock specialists were brought in to use their skills to get the parts moving again:





Original clock workings:



Still higher to go--into the pyramid at the very top:





Views from the narrow walkway at the base of the pyramid. I was too scared to go outside, so took some pictures from inside:















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Old January 10th, 2012, 07:22 AM   #52
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really nice updates from Seattle....
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Old January 10th, 2012, 07:33 PM   #53
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I'm jealous!
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Old January 16th, 2012, 09:18 AM   #54
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The Alaskan Way viaduct was opened in 1953, creating for the first time a limited access route through central Seattle without having to drive along downtown streets. From the beginning, it created a psychological, aesthetic and noise barrier between downtown and the waterfront. It has well outlived its life span. The strong earthquake of February 28, 2001 caused a lot of stress to the tired structure—pieces fell on the road below, cracks were created, the structure actually shifted and sunk in places. Quick repair work allowed the viaduct to reopen, but its days were numbered. What followed was a decade of endless debate—the infamous “Seattle process”. Nonbinding elections were held to try to determine if the people felt strongly one way or another as to a replacement. Some wanted a viaduct rebuild, others a tunnel. Yet others preferred a surface solution while still others wanted a sunken (though not totally lidded) roadway. Finally the governor of the state of Washington, the then-mayor of Seattle, along with King County and federal officials decided on a tunnel. What ensued was still more debate. The current mayor, a tunnel opponent, called for a yet another vote and it seems even the good people of Seattle had had enough. A vote to, in essence, block the tunnel went down to defeat by nearly 60% and the mayor finally realized the die was cast and removed his opposition. As of now, the project is going forward. When the tunnel opens in 2015, the entire viaduct will come down. In the meantime the southern end has already been removed. This past October when the entire viaduct was shut down for a weekend of preparation, the public was allowed to stroll a section that within days would itself be reduced to rubble and enter into history. Here are a few photos of that walk.

The former northbound on ramp from the stadium area would become the temporary northbound bypass route, until the tunnel opens. We used this ramp to gain access to the viaduct. The new southbound bypass lanes are to the left:





Staging area for the tunnel entrance:


Atop the viaduct:



Views of the port:













Some of the explanatory signage on display:







Looking south:


The former Qwest Field, now named Century Link Field (or the "Clink") home to the Seattle Seahawks of the National [American] Football League:


Safeco Field (the "Safe") home of the Seattle Mariners baseball team. The roof, here closed on a rainy day, is retractable and on a dry day is folded back so that the field and stands are basking in sunshine:


As far south as we could go. In the distance, portions of the viaduct are being torn down:





Looking north:











Just south of where we were on the viaduct. In a day or two, nothing will remain--the rubble will have been hauled away and the bypass lanes will open with nothing above them but sky:



Here is a link to some great old photos of how Alaskan Way looked before the viaduct and pictures of the viaduct construction:

http://www.seattlepi.com/local/seatt...oto-760450.php
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Old January 16th, 2012, 12:41 PM   #55
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Very interesting and informative. I agree that a tunnel is probably the best solution - will it have exit points along the route?

Looks like a damp time up there in Seattle.
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Old January 17th, 2012, 01:00 AM   #56
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For all the angst over a replacement option, the tunnel itself will be only about 1.5 miles (2.5 km) long. It will not have any exit or entrance points. Drivers from the north or south who want to reach downtown will exit at points just before the tunnel.
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Old January 17th, 2012, 01:15 AM   #57
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Wonderful idea!

Just like Boston and Madrid, Seattle will turn its viaduct into a tunnel, no long a scar in the city.

Btw, good to see a great American city that still has a working harbor next to it. I love staying in the Edgewater Hotel and seeing Mt. Rainier snow behind the cranes of the port.
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Old January 17th, 2012, 01:52 AM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pablogarlib View Post
Wonderful idea!

Just like Boston and Madrid, Seattle will turn its viaduct into a tunnel, no long a scar in the city.

Btw, good to see a great American city that still has a working harbor next to it. I love staying in the Edgewater Hotel and seeing Mt. Rainier snow behind the cranes of the port.
So true. A new path--already in place next to where the southern part of the viaduct has already been removed--goes right past one of the port's piers. At times it's noisy with trucks bringing goods to the port or taking them away--I love the clamor and the excitement. Adjacent this new path is a just built rail spur for positioning trains. Rail is a big mover in the port. Indeed, you can get very up close and personal to some of the Port of Seattle's facilities which are very expansive. In West Seattle, a great park extends out over yet more of the port--I'll have to get there and take pictures. I posted an earlier thread on the Duwamish River industrial area, which I think is fascinating. I'll look it up and see if I can link it here.

And yes, great things can now be planned for the Central Waterfront once the scar of the viaduct is gone.
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Old January 17th, 2012, 01:59 AM   #59
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Duwamish Industrial Area Thread

Hopefully this link will work:

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...light=duwamish
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Old January 18th, 2012, 08:22 PM   #60
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Hammered! The Seattle area got its first big snow today. Here is a picture of my house, compared to spring pictures of same:







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