daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Photo Forums > Urban Showcase

Urban Showcase Show your selfmade photos



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old January 18th, 2012, 08:35 PM   #61
Seattlelife
Registered User
 
Seattlelife's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Seattle/Brooklyn
Posts: 4,737
Likes (Received): 557

I love the snow we're getting today but those spring photos are incredible!
__________________
Supersonics Belong in Seattle


Sonicsgate, a must see! Just click and watch.
http://www.sonicsgate.org/
Seattlelife no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old January 22nd, 2012, 06:23 AM   #62
Ginkgo
Registered User
 
Ginkgo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Seattle
Posts: 1,679
Likes (Received): 3574

Here are some pictures I took a few years ago from [near] the top of the Columbia Tower, Seattle's tallest building. The observation deck is on the 73rd floor at about 900 feet (275 m) above the street and some 1,050 feet above sea level (Elliott Bay, part of Puget Sound). Puget Sound is actually nothing more than an inlet of the Pacific Ocean. The CT of course has the tallest observation deck in the city (see how "low" the Smith Tower seems in comparison, though the Smith Tower deck, which is open air, seems high enough). The Space Needle viewing deck is about 600 feet high (183 m). The only disadvantage of the Columbia Tower deck is that it doesn't wrap around the entire perimeter of the floor--only three-quarters. The northeast corner is taken up by a traffic control radio room. Nevertheless, what is viewable is spectacular.

To the north. The sliver of Lake Union on the far right is all one can see of the lake from the deck:



Queen Anne Hill rises behind the Space Needle, with Magnolia Hill to the left (west) of QA:



Cruise ship to Alaska at the Bell Street Terminal (see more below):



Elliott Bay toward the West Seattle peninsula, with the sound proper, islands and Olympic mountains beyond. The Pacific Ocean lies beyond the Olympics:



Some of the working port on the south end of the Central Waterfront visible here:



To the south. The ramp at the bottom center is the one we used to access the viaduct on the day the public was allowed on (see recent post). The viaduct to the south of this ramp is all gone now. The island off the the right (with the white tanks) is Harbor Island. When built 100 years ago, it was the largest man-made island in the world. It was constructed from ship ballast and from soil from the Jackson Hill regrade. Yes, two of Seattle's hills, thought to "impede commerce and progess" were actually flattened and levelled. West Seattle is beyond Harbor Island. SODO is to the south of the stadiums. There are two cruise ships in the East Waterway, between the mainland and the island. For a long time, Seattle hosted very few cruise ships to Alaska. The Jones Act prevented such cruising, which is a great irony in that the Jones Act is named for a former US Senator from Washington State who proposed it. It ended up, decades later, backfiring on the Seattle cruise business. In short, it states that US pasengers and cargo can be carried between US ports only on US-flagged vessels. Non US-flagged ships, which are basically all of the large cruise ships serving the US, can carry US passengers between US ports as long as they anchor at a non-US port. The previous generation of cruise ships was not fast enough to sail to Seattle to Alaska and back, with the requisite stop in Victoria, Canada, and still be economically viable. So Seattle lost out for years to Vancouver in the Alaska cruise business. But these new generations of ships are just faster enough to make the trip from Seattle viable, including the brief stop in Victoria. So the number of cuises from Seattle to Alaska has vastly increased over say, ten years ago. To such an extent that there wasn't enough room at the Bell Street cruise ship pier on the Central waterfront for all of the ships sailing. Some therefore docked at Pier 46 to the south. A new cruise ship complex has since been built at Pier 91 (Smith Cove) in Interbay, to the north:



SODO, (South of the Dome), after the Kingdome, now demolished and where Century Link stadium now stands. Union Station is at the bottom left corner, King Street Station to its right. Part of the Kingdome parking lot, between KSS and the Clink is slated for development:



The Smith Tower, far below, and beautifully restored Pioneer Square just beyond:



Interstate 5 (Mexico to Canada) runs north and south. Interstate 90 to the east starts here and ends up in Boston, Massachusetts, with not one traffic light in between! And that's a distance of 3,043 miles or 4,900 Kilometers! Beacon Hill neighborhood lies between the freeways:



Harborview Hospital complex, run now by the University of Washington. Massive place. Seattle is a major medical center with many hopsitals and research institutions. The Central District is beyond. The Mercer Island floating bridge (pontoon) connects to Mercer Island and thenc to the Eastside [of Lake Washington]. When light rails starts to the Eastside, it will use this bridge. It is part of I-90. Bellevue skyline is visible across Lake Washington:



Cascade Mountains to the east. This is as far as one can go this way around on the deck:

__________________
Big Green Chauvanist
Ginkgo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 22nd, 2012, 06:28 AM   #63
testdrive
Registered User
 
testdrive's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: North Bend
Posts: 3,483
Likes (Received): 1252

Thanks for taking the time to do this.............this is truely an amazing place.
testdrive no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 22nd, 2012, 12:13 PM   #64
openlyJane
Human Being
 
openlyJane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Liverpool
Posts: 31,721
Likes (Received): 43473

Fantastic - revealing the fabulous setting of the city - all of that water, green and mountain!

Queen Anne & Magnolia look like very desirable neighbourhoods.
openlyJane no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 22nd, 2012, 11:59 PM   #65
royal rose1
Registered User
 
royal rose1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Boston, Massachusetts
Posts: 995
Likes (Received): 259

Awesome pics! I was up at the top of Columbia Center, and it was an absolutely spectacular view! Here is a photo I took while up there.

royal rose1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 8th, 2012, 08:54 AM   #66
Ginkgo
Registered User
 
Ginkgo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Seattle
Posts: 1,679
Likes (Received): 3574

Random pictures taken today.





Old time movie palace now retail:







Residences right on the waterfront:





Century Link Field, Safeco Field, Mount Rainier, maritime activity:





Small marina serving the central waterfront:



Olympic Scupture Park. Site of former oil tank farm, it lay abandoned for decades as a blighted brownfield. Finally cleaned up five years ago and the sculpture garden, a unit of the Seattle Art Museum, was constructed on the property:











__________________
Big Green Chauvanist
Ginkgo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 8th, 2012, 12:33 PM   #67
openlyJane
Human Being
 
openlyJane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Liverpool
Posts: 31,721
Likes (Received): 43473

Do you think that if I visited Seattle, there might be a chance I'd bump into Eddie Vedder?
openlyJane no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 8th, 2012, 02:29 PM   #68
Linguine
leisure cook
 
Linguine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Bacolod Uptown East
Posts: 11,914
Likes (Received): 3939

awesome skyline and aerial shots of Seattle....
__________________
Bacolod: "Culinary destination par excellence"
Linguine no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 10th, 2012, 05:26 AM   #69
Ginkgo
Registered User
 
Ginkgo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Seattle
Posts: 1,679
Likes (Received): 3574

North of the sculpture garden is a thin but long stretch of a bicycle/pedestrian path, a great amenity to the city. Hemmed in by Elliott Bay and the railroad tracks, it was until the mid-70's a dumping ground for the railroad. Two contiguous parks were created, the southern one named Myrtle Edwards park for a former city council member. It is city property. The northern half, on port property, was originally called Elliott Bay Park, but was recently renamed in recognition of the the Port of Seattle's Centennial. A small indented beach was crafted from the straight shoreline at northern end of the the sculpture garden:





Looking back toward the working port with Mount Rainier in the distance:



One issue since the trails were opened has been a relative lack of connectivity to Elliott Avenue to the east of the tracks. Until now, once on the paths, one had to continue quite a distance north before the first bridge. A most welcomed addition is this Thomas Street overpass, which will not only pass over the tracks, but will also allow one to reach the far side of busy Elliott Avenue without having to cross the street:













__________________
Big Green Chauvanist
Ginkgo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 10th, 2012, 01:05 PM   #70
openlyJane
Human Being
 
openlyJane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Liverpool
Posts: 31,721
Likes (Received): 43473

To have a snow-covered Mount Ranier as a city backdrop is just brilliant.
openlyJane no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 10th, 2012, 01:07 PM   #71
stvoreque
stvoreque
 
stvoreque's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Paris/Maisons-Laffitte
Posts: 7,902
Likes (Received): 4188

Seattle- A M A Z I N G! Thanks for this thread!
stvoreque no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 12th, 2012, 05:45 AM   #72
Ginkgo
Registered User
 
Ginkgo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Seattle
Posts: 1,679
Likes (Received): 3574

Continuing north on the Centennial Park trail is the grain elevator. Rail cars arrive from the Midwest wheat states as well as from Eastern Washington and the wheat is loaded on ships bound for Asia. This one was a Chinese vessel:



The dock can hold only one ship per loading, so others are frequently found in the open waters of Elliott Bay awaiting their turn:



Until the Thomas Street Bridge opens, this is the first connection to Elliott Avenue over the tracks. Queen Anne beyond the Helix style bridge:



The grain elevator may not be the prettiest site along the waterfront, but is a big money-maker for the Port of Seattle:



Looking back south toward downtown (and in the haze, Mount Rainier):



The Amgen (biopharmaceuticals) complex. After the original industry on this site was abandoned, the property fell into disrepair and was for decades a derelict, cinder-strewn brownfield until the Immunex company built this research center, later taken over by the Amgen company. Queen Anne beyond:



Pier 90 waterway. At this location a century ago, ships laden with silk arrived from Japan and were unloaded. The silk was sent by fast trains to markets in the Midwest and East. Magnolia Bridge (and Magnolia itself) in the distance:



Then as now, the railroad is adjacent:



Maritime-themed sculptured concrete retaining wall:



As noted earlier, there is not enough room on the central waterfront for all of the cruise ships which visit the port in season. Some dock here at Pier 91:



Here is where the main paths end, but a bicycle path (pedestrians welcome) continues north through the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Interbay freight yard. Under the Magnolia Bridge. Magnolia is somewhat isolated in that there are only three road accesses into the district: The Magnolia (or Garfield Street) Bridge, the Dravus Street Bridge and the Emerson Street Bridge, all going over the railroad. Magnolia is a misnomer. When Captain George Vancouver's party in the 18th century entered what is now Elliott Bay he mistook madrona trees for the more familiar (to him) magnolia. The name, though incorrect, stuck:



I like trains so enjoy walking through the yard, grafitti and all:









Dravus Street Bridge in distance:



On the Dravus Street Bridge:



High rise section of Magnolia Bridge in center background:



I knew a Sounder commuter train would be arriving so I waited a few minutes. This is the North line connecting Seattle to northern suburbs of Edmonds, Mukilteo and Everett. A short distance north of here, the line runs directly on the shore of Puget Sound with all the great views that entails:



__________________
Big Green Chauvanist
Ginkgo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 13th, 2012, 04:36 AM   #73
Ginkgo
Registered User
 
Ginkgo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Seattle
Posts: 1,679
Likes (Received): 3574

Sorry about the deletions in the thread. I ran over my space limit and before I could act, some of the pictures were deleted by the service. I still have the pictures saved on my hard drive. Perhaps at one point I will attempt to reconstruct the thread or do it over. Thanks for the comments!
__________________
Big Green Chauvanist
Ginkgo no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 02:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium