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Old February 6th, 2005, 12:11 PM   #21
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Thats a really beautiful Science Park!
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Old April 29th, 2005, 05:48 PM   #22
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Science Park boss to step down
Mark Lee
16 February 2005
Hong Kong Standard

Hong Kong Science and Technology Park Corporation, a government-funded unit to promote high-tech industry,said its chief executive Tam Chung-ding will leave the company when his contract expires in March.

The announcement followed media reports this week that the government decided not to award Tam a new contractas it was unhappy about allegations last year linking Tam and other Science Park executives to misuse of public funds.

However, Tam, the 61-year-old formertop executive at United States technologygiant Motorola, said it had always been his decision not to serve another three-year contract. Tam said he told Science Park staff of his decision to retire on Tuesday.

"We have completed the constructionfor phase one of the new complexes, as well as planning for phase two,'' Tam said Tuesday. "The occupancy rate of the Science Park is far higher than that of the Cyberport.''

A spokesman for the Commerce, Industryand Technology Bureau, which owns the Science Park, denied Tam's departure was due to government dissatisfactionwith his performance.

"Mr Tam is retiring for entirely personalreasons and we fully respect his decision,'' he said.

It was alleged in Hong Kong newspaperreports last year that Tam and SciencePark chairman Victor Lo bypassed normal recruitment procedures and hired former employees of Motorola and Gold Peak Industries, of which Lo is a director, to work at the Science Park.

Tam was also implicated in allegations that public funds were misused to pay for golf club membershipsand a company car that was not part of his remuneration package.

Hong Kong media also said that the government was unhappy about low occupancyrates at the newly constructed Science Park complexes in Pak Shek Kok. Occupancy at phase one of the new complex, which cost HK$4 billion to build, is currently about 75 percent. Phase two, costing HK$3.9 billion, will be completed in 2007.

Tam said the independent review carried out by KPMG into the newspaperallegations cleared the managementon most counts of the allegations, but admitted they had been culpable in some areas.

"We need to improve some aspects of our corporate governance - we are not perfect,'' he said.

During his three-year tenure at the Science Park, Tam oversaw the multibillion dollar construction project and helped attract some high-profile technology firms to the new facilities, including Philips Electronics and SolomonSystech. Tam also set up co-operation agreements with a number of mainland technology centers, including Shanghai and Beijing.

Apart from the new park complexes, the Science Park also manages industrialestates in Tai Po, Yuen Long and Tseung Kwan O. The Science Park made a loss of HK$43 million last year, but hopes to achieve break-even this year.

Tam joined the Science Park in 2001 after a 33-year career at Motorola, in which he became the first Hong Kong employee to head one of its worldwide product groups as executive vice-president.
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Old April 29th, 2005, 10:46 PM   #23
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A Hub for Innovation & Technology in Asia

Inaugurated on 7 May 2001 as a statutory body set up by the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, the Hong Kong Science and Technology Parks Corporation (HKSTP) is leading the transformation of Hong Kong into Asia's hub for technology innovation in the focused clusters (Electronics, Biotechnology, Precision Engineering , and IT & Telecommunications).

HKSTP offers a comprehensive range of services to cater for the needs of industry at various stages, ranging from offering a series of management and technical support programmes through industry and university collaboration; nurturing technology start-ups through the Incu-Tech programme support at a Tech Centre; providing advanced facilities and support services in the 22-hectare state-of-the-art Hong Kong Science Park for applied R&D activities; providing land and premises in the three Industrial Estates totaling 239 hectare for hi-tech manufacturing.

Advanced facilities and support services available for high technology companies include an IC Design/ Development Support Centre and a Photonics Development Support Centre for its tenants and incubatees as well as access to the best scientific and business minds that Hong Kong, China and the world have to offer.

Real Time Images of Phase 2 Construction Site



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Old April 30th, 2005, 12:53 AM   #24
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Great architecture...SUPERB details...and a lovely campus treatment....I would definetely check that out.

Any more info on any public displays or instalations?





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Old April 30th, 2005, 08:02 PM   #25
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WOW!
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Old May 1st, 2005, 04:32 PM   #26
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Great, I love such developments, nice to see those parks comin up more often these days.
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Old May 1st, 2005, 05:05 PM   #27
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Great pics!!
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Old May 1st, 2005, 07:42 PM   #28
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Background



he whole project is divided into 3 phases to be completed by 2004, 2006 and 2009 respectively. On completion, it provides a total gross floor area of 330,000 sq. metres.

Phase I

Part of Phase I is now fully operational with three types of building for lease, namely Corporate, Campus and Core. Each type of building is designed to suit different space requirements and thus potential tenants of all sizes can be accommodated.

Core Buildings

Occupying the central area, the 3 core buildings provide ideal locations for tenants requiring premises less than 20,000 sq. ft. The core building zone also forms the backbone of the Park which provides facilities such as business/conference centres, restaurants, gymnasium, serviced-apartments and car-park.

Corporate Buildings

The 4 corporate buildings aimed at larger users (over 50,000 sq. ft.) who want an individual image. They will have the opportunity to occupy high-quality, stand-alone, low-rise units with low site coverage in a landscaped environment facing the Tolo Harbour.

Campus Buildings

The 2 campus buildings are intended for medium-sized companies who require 20,000 - 50,000 sq.ft. The units in this zone allow tenants with greater flexibility for growth and individual furnishing requirements.
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Old May 3rd, 2005, 06:12 AM   #29
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Pioneering spirit; Science and Technology Park chief Tam Chung-ding is retiring after playing a central role in taking the ground-breaking facility close to profitability
21 April 2005
South China Morning Post

Outspoken information technology industry veteran Tam Chung-ding is fond of symbolism, even for mundane occasions such as finding a souvenir for an office opening. At the launch of Royal Philips Electronics' new six-storey building in the Hong Kong Science Park on February 2, Mr Tam gave senior officials of the Dutch manufacturing giant a desktop copper model of a Chinese junk - with "1421" inscribed on its sail.

"The engraving refers to the year the Chinese discovered America, ahead of Columbus," said Mr Tam, who served as chief executive of the Hong Kong Science and Technology Parks Corporation (HKSTP) until March 31.

It also referred to the title of a controversial book on the subject, written by former Royal Navy submarine commanding officer Gavin Menzies and first published in Britain in 2002. Mr Tam said that the keepsake given to Philips, the park's first major multinational tenant, also represented a milestone closer to home. "In 2005, Philips discovered the Hong Kong Science Park," he said.

Two weeks later, Mr Tam seemed prepared to set sail himself, when he announced his retirement as Science Park chief at the end of his three-year term last month.

"My job is done," he said. "After three years, I feel I have accomplished most of the missions in marketing, technology support and finance that I set out for myself before retiring at 60."

Although he agreed to stay on in an advisory capacity until May 31, when a worldwide search for his replacement should be completed, Mr Tam's sudden exit is the latest snag to hit Hong Kong's belated entry in the race to become the region's technology centre.

When he departs, Mr Tam will leave behind several major developments, including a modern chip-design complex, close co-operation with similar integrated circuit design bases on the mainland, a marketing strategy for the park based on four technology clusters, the completion of the site's phase one infrastructure, and the groundwork for phase two.

He also leaves behind lingering criticism over the billions spent by the government to fund these and other related projects.

The $3.3 billion, 22-hectare Science Park site in Tai Po, near the Chinese University of Hong Kong, was designed to emulate California's Silicon Valley in fostering strategic clusters of technology development relating to electronics, telecommunications, biotechnology and precision engineering.

But that message apparently was muddled by the government's controversial decision to develop the $13 billion Cyberport facility in Pokfulam with the help of Pacific Century CyberWorks (PCCW).

Much scepticism and confusion followed, leading critics to label the Science Park a "white elephant" that overlapped with the hi-tech development and property-oriented goals of Cyberport.

In the scramble for a similar range of IT tenants, marketing teams from Science Park and Cyberport have gone head-to-head to promote incentives such as limited rent-free periods to prospective tenants.

Mr Tam said that he had asked senior government officials about the need to build Cyberport, and his questions remained unanswered.

Long before Cyberport was on the drawing board, Hong Kong had spent 10 years investigating the creation of a "technology corridor" in the New Territories. Mr Tam said that about 1987, representatives from the colonial government, academia and local industry started discussions on setting up a science park in Hong Kong.

"That was the time when key Hong Kong manufacturing industries, including textile and electronics, started moving their factories up north to the mainland," he said. "This was a natural evolution: a move to lower cost areas for production."

Mr Tam, who was then a senior executive for a semiconductor business, said the discussions touched on how that movement would steadily hollow out Hong Kong's industrial base and how the city needed to build local workers' product design, and research and development expertise to remain competitive.

"The idea of developing a science park along the lines of what Singapore and Taiwan have done was based on those markets' successes in transforming their economies into hi-tech ones," he said. But at the time the Hong Kong government took a strictly non-interventionist approach to the commercial sector. Adhering to laissez-faire economics meant that government policy was to not interfere with market forces, so there was no rush to draw up plans for a science park.

Several years of public and private sector consultations followed, interspersed with a number of government-funded studies. The Industry and Technology Development Council, the colonial government's principal adviser on those areas, closely followed these activities.

"Unfortunately, other governments in Asia didn't follow Hong Kong's policy on market forces. To them, market forces are dictated by government policy," said Mr Tam, who previously served as Motorola executive vice-president and then president of its Asia-Pacific operations.

While Hong Kong continued to deliberate about a science park, governments such as those in Singapore, Taiwan, South Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines and local authorities across the mainland moved aggressively to set up science parks and development zones with big incentives to attract regional and multinational investors.

In a 1995 policy address, then-governor Chris Patten first outlined the establishment of a science park in Hong Kong. "Our investments in scientific and technological research have a direct bearing on the enterprise and innovation which are key to our future prosperity," he said.

At his 1997 budget speech, then financial secretary Donald Tsang Yam-kuen unveiled the government's decision to fund the first phase of the science park project. He said a planning committee would examine the project in detail and take it forward when the site in Tai Po became available in 1998.

During a speech to entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley in 1999, Chief Executive Tung Chee-hwa laid the intellectual ground for developing Hong Kong's own science park and the city's new interventionist stance.

"The only way to predict the future is to have the power to shape it," said Mr Tung, quoting US writer and philosopher Eric Hoffer.

The HKSTP was formed on May 7, 2001, after a three-way merger of the Hong Kong Industrial Estates Corporation, the Hong Kong Industrial Technology Centre Corporation and the Provisional Hong Kong Science Park Company Limited.

It was established to bring world-class technology and a highly skilled workforce together in a purpose-built environment that would accommodate local and international companies of all sizes. The project was expected to create up to 25,000 new IT jobs in Hong Kong by 2010. The corporation includes the Science Park in Tai Po, the Tech Centre in Kowloon Tong, the Tai Po Industrial Estate, the Yuen Long Industrial Estate and the Tseung Kwan O Industrial Estate.

When Mr Tam concluded his 33-year career at Motorola to become the Science Park boss in April 2002, the facility's tenancy level was at 45 per cent, with 13 tenants, including large local electronics manufacturer VTech.

At the time of Mr Tam's retirement announcement, 75 per cent of the Science Park's first phase had been leased. He said he expected the facility to reach 90 per cent occupancy at the end of this year when negotiations with new tenants were completed.

HKSTP chairman Victor Lo Chung-wing commended Mr Tam for a "more than satisfactory performance" over the past three years.

Mr Tam is credited with establishing policies for good corporate governance and reducing operating losses at the HKSTP. He estimated a HK$10 million loss for the corporation in its latest financial year and a "near break-even financial position" for the 2005-2006 period.

One of the success stories under his watch was local tenant Solomon Systech (International). The company, which designs chips for display products, raised US$600 million in its initial public offering last year and reported turnover of US$308.23 million last year.

But legislator Sin Chung-kai said the next Science Park chief should pursue a more aggressive marketing strategy, based on the fundamentals established by Mr Tam.

Signing up more companies to relocate and providing more value-added services to tenants are expected to allow the HKSTP to solely fund future phases of the site.

Humphrey Leung Kwong-wai, managing director at Solomon Systech, said a clearer policy of support - one that could emulate the government's strong support for the financial sector - would be needed to help ensure the Science Park's continued viability.

Toa Charm, Asia-Pacific general manager at Hong Kong-listed mainland software firm Kingdee, said Mr Tung's administration tried different things - including the Digital 21 Strategy, the Science Park and Cyberport - but still couldn't define a clear role for Hong Kong's IT community.

Still, Mr Tam remains upbeat about the Science Park's future. He also sees plenty of symbolism in his departure and the transition of this government-backed technology development initiative into a self-sustaining enterprise.

"I think of myself and the HKSTP as the team that has secured the beachhead near Troy. We have taken over the temple of Apollo and await the landing of reinforcements before taking the city," he said.

On that note, time will tell how much further Hong Kong's science park initiative will develop before any Achilles' heel - whether due to political or market forces - becomes apparent.
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Old June 26th, 2005, 07:05 PM   #30
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View from a service apartment in Science Park (Sorry for the bad weather:P)



Interior



Hallway



Plaque


Lobby




Outside









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Old June 27th, 2005, 04:41 PM   #31
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Hong Kong Science and Technology Parks Corporation Fosters Outstanding Tenants and Incubatees in IC Design Cluster

June 2005 - Hong Kong Science and Technology Parks Corporation (HKSTP) has fostered many renowned tenants and incubatees in only four years of operation. These successes are made possible by the high quality hard and soft infrastructures that have been established at the Hong Kong Science Park . Nowhere has HKSTP’s support of tenants and incubatees been more significant than in the Integrated Circuit ( IC ) design cluster.

The IC Design/Development Support Centre at the Park provides intellectual property services, test development services and engineering run production for IC companies. Many start-ups and established companies, such as Andigilog, Appotech, APT, ASTRI, Dragonchip, ENW Electronics, Solomon Microtech, Solomon Systech, Think Technology and others have benefited from the Park’s electronic design automation (EDA) tools. The EDA-on-demand programme is the first of its kind in Asia.

One tenant in particular, Solomon Systech, was the first Science Park tenant listed on the Main Board of The Stock Exchange of Hong Kong Limited in April 2004 and has now become the largest fabless IC company in China and Hong Kong in terms of revenue, which was HK$2.4 billion for the fiscal year of 2004. Presently, their market value was placed at ~HK$6.8 billion, which is higher than the capital spending of HK$4 Billion for Phase 1 of the Science Park. Their 2004 profit is at a remarkable 19% PAT. Their expertise is in design, development and sales of semiconductor IC products for flat panel displays.

But medium to large companies are not the only one who can receive support and assistance from HKSTP hard and soft infrastructure. HKSTP’s Incu-Tech Programme has successfully incubated over 180 companies, helping participants achieve remarkable recognition and funding support.

One incubatee, Appotech, a fables s IC design house committed to the provision of high quality and cost-effective IC solutions, recently won second prize in the national “Incubating Innovative Products IC Design Competition” in China. Appotech’s winning design is a RISC MCU which has gone into production and receiving good customer reception.

“Solomon Systech and Appotech are but two of the many tenants and incubatees of the Science Park and each of them , whether start-up or established company, has demonstrated technological and business leadership,” said Mr. C.D. Tam, former CEO of HKSTP before his retirement from HKSTP on May 31, 2005.

The accomplishments of companies like Solomon Systech and Appotech and the role that HKSTP has played in them has not gone unappreciated. Dr. Ma Songde, Vice Minister of the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) of the People’s Republic of China, recently presented a thank-you letter to Mr. John Tsang Chun-wah, JP, Secretary for Commerce, Industry and Technology of the HKSAR, expressing his appreciation for Hong Kong Science & Technology Park Corporation’s support in fostering the development of the IC design industry on the Mainland and in Hong Kong. The “7+1” programme between HKSTP and the High-Tech Research and Development Centre of MOST, which went into effect in December 2003, was highlighted as a key point of support from CD Tam, former CEO and SW Cheug VP of Business Development and Technology Support.
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Old June 28th, 2005, 02:42 AM   #32
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simply amazing !

nice pics...

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Old July 31st, 2005, 08:16 PM   #33
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Hong Kong Science and Technology Parks Corporation further develops Semiconductor Intellectual Property Trading platform for greater China
Corporate Press Release

Hong Kong (July 7, 2005) –– Hong Kong Science and Technology Parks Corporation (HKSTP) announcesa joint collaboration with leading Chinese technology and engineering universities to extend the semiconductor intellectual property (SIP) trading platform throughout Greater China under the “7+1” frame work. The landmark collaboration will leverage the integrated circuit (IC) research and knowledge-base of Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT ), Hefei University of Technology, Zhejiang University and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology to further expand the Greater China Semiconductor Intellectual Property Trading Centre (GCSIPTC)service capability at the Hong Kong Science Park.

The main objective of the collaboration between HKSTP and the four universities is to develop a due diligence platform in legal and technical terms for SIP certification and authentication purposes. The project will be completed in mid-2006. Through the tremendous effort of all involved parties, the seven national IC design centres in China and other established SIP trading centres in Shanghai and Beijing will be able to share a very well developed platform. The material will also be the backbone of IC and SIP related teaching courses for Master of Science degrees in the universities of China and Hong Kong.

“Hong Kong has been recognised by the Ministry of Science and Technology of China as the pioneer IC design centre in China under the ‘7+1’ IC Design Centre frame work. We can leverage our many advantages over the Chinese cities for the silicon intellectual property management and trading,” said Professor Philip C. H. Chan, Dean of Engineering, HKUST. “HKUST has strong academic research in the area of IC design and extensively collaborated with many industrial leaders worldwide. The University is dedicated to nurturing an environment where the territory’s IC industry can acquire the capability of designing and producing our own ICs. The development of the SIP verification platform should surely be a cornerstone of helping the local IC design industry to advance towards this direction.”

“As a major IC design and purchasing centre, Hong Kong has many obvious advantages in the area of IP trading, and the development of the SIP trading platform will promote Hong Kong’s competitive position in the China market,” said Professor Ye , Harbin Institute of Technology , Chairman of China IP standard work group. “With significant support from the Ministry of Information Industry and the National ‘863’ Project, HIT has consistently focused its research on IP standards, IP reuse and System-on-Chip (SoC) design methodologies for several years. With the combination of technical and resource advantages between the mainland and Hong Kong, the development of a SIP quality measurement and legal framework associated with SIP trading is helpful to the whole IC industry in China.”

“HKSTP has been providing top quality SIP cores and libraries such as Artisan, ARM, Synopsys and China Core, since October 2003 to the IC industries in Hong Kong and China,” said Ir. S.W. Cheung, Vice President of Business Development and Technology Support of HKSTP. “The due diligence process of a SIP verification platform is a must, and it offers great domestic SIP cores in terms of trading with the outside world. Those qualified IP libraries with the endorsement from the verification platform can be traded with other IP trading organisations through the well connected IP trading centre in HKSTP . ”

“IP and SoC design technology have been greatly improved in recent years, but the IP and SoC industries in China are still not fully built. The key point is that there is no scientific and effective interface between the two industries. T he absent interface is IP reuse infrastructure and theory,” explained Professor Gao , Hefei University of Technology . “The VLSI Design Institute at HFUT is dedicated to IP r euse theory research in order to provide a reuse framework for the IC industry. W e proposed an IC engineering theory based on three Hi-Tech Research and Development Program Projects. The IP qualification platform and trading centre s should become important infrastructures to help acquire the design capabilities of complex SoC and to promote the evolution of IP and SoC industries by applying engineering theory to them.”

“The reuse and circulation of SIP plays a very important role in the development of today’s semiconductor industry. Hong Kong enjoys a good reputation for its first-class, international business environment and good business credits,” said Professor Yan Xiaolang, Zhejiang University . “ It is an ideal place to develop the SIP verification platform, which shall greatly benefit the promotion of SIP reuse and trade in the greater China region. Zhejiang University gives top priority to its academic and industrial cooperation and exchange with its national and international partners, and it has accumulated rich experience in the field of IC, including SIP. Zhejiang University wishes to work hand in hand with its Hong Kong counterparts as well as the mainland ones to promote and make contributions to the development of the Chinese IC industry.”
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Old August 5th, 2005, 12:26 PM   #34
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Simple. Futuristic. Modern. Beautiful.

Overall awesome!!! God's creations!
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Old August 7th, 2005, 05:05 PM   #35
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That's a really beautiful
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Old August 8th, 2005, 02:01 AM   #36
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a fantastic addition to HK!~
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Old August 8th, 2005, 02:56 PM   #37
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simply a marvellous project.....!!
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Old August 8th, 2005, 03:12 PM   #38
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wow
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Old February 21st, 2006, 05:59 AM   #39
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Hunt begins for hi-tech tenants of creative hub
Phase two of the Hong Kong Science and Technology Park is nearing completion
21 February 2006
South China Morning Post

The Hong Kong Science and Technology Parks (HKSTP) will push for a more aggressive marketing strategy to win new tenants, build future key industries and gain the public's confidence.

Led by new chief executive Carlos Genardini, the corporation also plans to foster more local hi-tech business development through a flexible and pragmatic use of government assets under its stewardship.

"More industries will be at the centre of what we build," Mr Genardini told the South China Morning Post.

"We want to be a good role model [in the Pearl River Delta] on how to develop infrastructure at a reasonable cost to nurture industries and how to attract people who want to be here."

The Science Park, which expects to continue marketing itself overseas, will put renewed emphasis on attracting more Hong Kong and mainland firms.

Mr Genardini said the focus on integrated circuit design would also continue, but the corporation would refocus on biotechnology, precision engineering, wireless communications for logistics and nanotechnology.

"Our laboratories are designed to support multiple industries," he said.

The Science Park facilities in Tai Po are divided into four industry clusters: electronics, biotechnology, precision engineering, and information technology and telecommunications.

"I think it is important for more people to see what we do," Mr Genardini said.

The campaign to win the hearts and minds of businesses and the general public is expected to accelerate as the Science Park nears completion of its phase two development at the 22.4-hectare site in Tai Po.

HKSTP senior executives are optimistic the new phase, to be completed in 2008, would significantly improve people's perception of the science park.

Besides office buildings, phase two will include a large auditorium equipped with world-class conference and meeting facilities, and new leisure elements including landscaped open spaces, lakeside al fresco amenity areas, speciality restaurants, shops and a beautiful promenade along the Tolo Harbour. This ambience was designed to inspire innovation and creativity, according to the company.

"We are building facilities that will be around for the next 50 to 60 years, or longer. That is why I am sensitive to the long-term view and on planning for the evolution of industries," Mr Genardini said.

The corporation was created from a three-way merger of the Hong Kong Industrial Estates Corporation, Hong Kong Industrial Technology Centre Corporation, and the Provisional Hong Kong Science Park Company Limited.

The corporation includes the Science Park in Tai Po, the Inno Centre in Kowloon Tong, the Tai Po Industrial Estate, Yuen Long Industrial Estate and Tseung Kwan O Industrial Estate.

HKSTP chairman Victor Lo Chung Wing said the corporation was also determined to erase any misunderstanding the public might have about the Science Park, the three phases of which cost about $4 billion each to develop.

"We have been trying to supply a missing segment of the market," Mr Lo said, noting that the facility represented necessary infrastructure.

"This is infrastructure development, not a commercial project."

Noting the Taiwan science park model, he said the semiconductor and other hi-tech industries created by infrastructure investments needed about 25 years to develop.

"If Hong Kong just followed the commercial point of view, then hospitals and schools would be moved to Shenzhen and the land sold to real estate developers," Mr Lo said.

Still, the Science Park plans to wean itself away from government funding. The corporation intends to finance most, if not all, of its phase three infrastructure development work at Tai Po. As phase three is not due to start for two to three years, the corporation has more time to boost its reserves.

"Just how much less we will need of government funds will depend on how strong our balance sheet is by then," Mr Lo said. He said the corporation was reviewing rentals at all the centres and estates under its management.

The prospects of a self-reliant HKSTP, a statutory body formed in 2001, has become more realistic after the corporation narrowed its deficit to $10.9 million for the year to March 31 from a high of $45 million two years ago.

Pau Shiu-hung, the corporation's vice-president for projects, said that planning for phase three must begin to ensure that the city would be able to cope with future demand for research and development facilities from local and overseas companies.

"Through the Science Park, Hong Kong is effecting change as we establish a home for hi-tech industries here in Hong Kong that rivals all regional competitors," Mr Genardini said. "We have a lot of work to do."
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Old February 21st, 2006, 10:57 PM   #40
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