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Old April 15th, 2012, 07:35 PM   #121
the golden vision
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Quote:
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It was just a thought. The building adjoining where I live is listed merely by being on the same block despite being in an entirely different architectural style and an "outbuilding" built many decades later also come under the Grade 11 listing despite having no architectural significance. Anyway.....
That will be probably be a listing under 'group interest only' It usually happens with a terrace of houses where one which wouldn't normally be listed(altered or similar) is included with the others that are worthy of listing for the group interest.
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Old April 15th, 2012, 08:53 PM   #122
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It was just a thought. The building adjoining where I live is listed merely by being on the same block despite being in an entirely different architectural style and an "outbuilding" built many decades later also come under the Grade 11 listing despite having no architectural significance. Anyway.....
I think that is just a side effect of listing Joe. I have heard of railway viaducts that have had modern overhead electrification equipment that have been listed. Any alterations to or dismantling of that equipment will require listed building consent.
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Old April 16th, 2012, 01:11 AM   #123
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I've had a quick look at EH's website, there are 2.5% designated Grade 1 but i can't see anything about a maximum. Where did you see it? it seems arbitary to say the least doesn't it?
My mistake, I agree the percentages are not a maximum. The point that The Oratory need only be one of the top 9,300 buildings in the country remains valid, however. (I think)
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Old April 21st, 2012, 06:26 PM   #124
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A view from the east of the chancel arch and tower of St Luke's church , Berry St.
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Old April 21st, 2012, 06:41 PM   #125
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The cream terracotta facade of Imperial Chambers, corner of Whitechapel and Victoria St.
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Old April 21st, 2012, 06:51 PM   #126
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The Merebank pub,Heyworth St, Everton. A great little building this, not just the terracotta work , the woodwork and pargetting (a type of plaster work) Across the road from the Merebank is the Grade 1 , St George's church(one of John Cragg's 'iron' churches) and just a few yards north is Everton library, another good building.
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Old April 21st, 2012, 10:48 PM   #127
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Ruabon Brick


Ruabon Brick is a fiery red, pressed brick, a type of engineering brick,it is very strong, with a smooth face and sharp edges. It was used on the Victoria Building of Liverpool University and is probably the source of the term 'red brick university.

Ruabon is a village in north Wales, where in the late 19thc large deposits of a red marl clay were disovered. Several brickworks and factories sprung up to exploit this and by the 1880's large scale production of brick, terracotta and tiles had begun.
Another type of red pressed brick very similar to Ruabon was being produced about the same time in the Lancashire town of Accrington. A lot of the factories,mills and terraced houses of Lancashire were built with this brick, whereas the Liverpool area it would've been Ruabon.


There's almost a stigma about red brick, the little put down about the provincial universities is a an example of this but it can't be denied, pressed red brick is a very useful building material, as some of the following photos will illustrate.
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Old April 21st, 2012, 11:00 PM   #128
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The entrance to the Main Bridewell, Cheapside. The use of red engineering brick here,1859, actually pre-dates the manufacture of Ruabon and Accrington reds. It must be the earliest example of this type of brick in the city centre.
If you look at this wall closely you can only admire the strength and durability of these bricks, over 150 years old and almost the same condition as when first laid, neatly jointed, with hardly any mortar visible, what not to like
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Old April 21st, 2012, 11:10 PM   #129
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Ruabon brick on Myrtle St, 1890's. Again, like the Bridewell the bricks here have retained their sharpness after more than a century.
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Old April 21st, 2012, 11:16 PM   #130
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The Victoria Building, Liverpool University. Built with Ruabon brick,terracotta and common brick, this building is the likely source of the term 'red brick university'
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Old April 21st, 2012, 11:26 PM   #131
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The Prudential Assurance building, Dale St, Ruabon brick and terracotta. This and the previous building(Victoria Building) are by Liverpool architect, Alfred Waterhouse, who so favoured red brick and terracotta he was nicknamed 'Slaughterhouse Waterhouse' by some of his critics.
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Old April 21st, 2012, 11:38 PM   #132
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Chancery House House, Paradise St.
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Old April 21st, 2012, 11:57 PM   #133
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St Dunstan's church, Edge Hill. An interesting use of Ruabon clay here,the statue isn't moulded which is the normal method for statuary in this medium and for terracotta incidentally,here the statue has been sculpted from Ruabon clay
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Old April 28th, 2012, 10:58 PM   #134
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These insignificant looking gothic details, hinge and floor tiles , were designed by the most influential figure of the Gothic Revival in England and probably most influential architect of Victorian England, Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin. The tiles and door are in the hall of of the former St Joseph's Home, next to Bishop Eton Monastery, Childwall. It was originally built as a private residence called Oswaldcroft in 1844 and designed by Pugin, little of the original interior survives unfortunately but this building is still the best example of Pugin's work remaining in Liverpool, the only other work by Pugin in the city is the steeple of St Oswald's church, Old Swan.

I was luckily let in to the grounds of the building by a dellightfully eccentric old lady, who not only gave me a tour of the outside of the building but let me know where the key to the main gate was hidden if i should visit again(which she wasn't in a position to divulge)

I enjoyed my morning in Childwall, visiting the woods and buildings but the highlight was undoubtedly meeting this wonderful woman.
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Old April 29th, 2012, 03:57 PM   #135
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Chancery House House, Paradise St.
GV. Am I right in thinking that this building has been partially reconstructed following WWII? The elevation onto the corner of Paradise Street and Hanover Street (just visible in your second photo) looks very plain compared to the rest.
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Old April 29th, 2012, 06:09 PM   #136
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Martin,

According to Pevsner "....blind gothic tracery above the windows and three big stepped gables. A simpler wing, originally lower, turns the corner into Hanover Street"

So you may well be right.
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With the possible exception of being Garth Crooks

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Old April 29th, 2012, 08:04 PM   #137
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Interesting Joe - although I would have thought that the original would have been higher.
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Old April 29th, 2012, 08:06 PM   #138
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Good spot Martin
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Old April 29th, 2012, 08:19 PM   #139
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The double pyramid roof at Bishop Eton Monastery, Childwall.
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Old April 29th, 2012, 08:41 PM   #140
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Thanks for posting that GV. I used to go to Childwall Primary School (a large 1930s neo-Georgian building now sadly demolished) and I would catch my bus home from the corner of Woolton Road and Taggart Avenue which is just opposite the monastery. In those days, as well as the pyramid roof shown in your photograph there was a tall, thin lantern tower, which I think was destroyed in a fire at the monastery back in the 80s.
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