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Old March 16th, 2012, 09:38 AM   #21
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Old March 16th, 2012, 04:46 PM   #22
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You can find out how well you train?
Sorry, but I don't get this sentence.
I'm not a train for sure
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Old March 16th, 2012, 05:40 PM   #23
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I suppose he means "to train"...

Anyway, there's potential for a decent network, but in the current form, that's neither high speed rail (as this would include, at least in my opinion, more than one daily service) nor economically.
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Old March 16th, 2012, 06:32 PM   #24
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1 daily connection and a travel time of 2 hours for 340km aren't that spectacular.
If it takes really two hours for 340 (or 360) km on a conventional line then it IS spectacular
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Old March 16th, 2012, 07:49 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thun View Post
I suppose he means "to train"...

Anyway, there's potential for a decent network, but in the current form, that's neither high speed rail (as this would include, at least in my opinion, more than one daily service) nor economically.
I'm sorry. This high-speed railway. Your opinion for us is not important. You are a critic. Criticize without knowing. You are not a constructive critic.
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Old March 16th, 2012, 07:56 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by XAN_ View Post
Sorry, but I don't get this sentence.
I'm not a train for sure
I want to know more about you. Where do you live? Do you have high-speed trains? and what speed?
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Old March 16th, 2012, 09:06 PM   #27
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I want to know more about you. Where do you live? Do you have high-speed trains? and what speed?

Go to other threads if you want to know about other high-speed trains. This is all about Uzbekistan Hi-speed Railways. No fighting, just Uzbekistan.
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Old March 17th, 2012, 12:00 AM   #28
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great trains! hehe
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Old March 18th, 2012, 12:08 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citi View Post
I want to know more about you. Where do you live? Do you have high-speed trains? and what speed?
I'm from Kiev, Ukraine. I don't have any trains personally But my country has some. Their top speed are 160 km/h, which a the same as the current speed of Afrosiyab. The 160 isn't a true High Speed rail by a world-wide standards. I'm really looking forward for both Ukraine and Uzbekistan further upgrading their railway networks and introducing true high speed services (that's starting from 200...220 km/h and more).
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Old March 18th, 2012, 12:14 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coccodrillo View Post
If it takes really two hours for 340 (or 360) km on a conventional line then it IS spectacular
343 km in 2:30. It's a good speed for conventional line, but nothing fantastic.
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Old March 18th, 2012, 03:17 PM   #31
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343 km in 2:30. It's a good speed for conventional line, but nothing fantastic.
Well, it 2h and 50' for 360 km, is not bad at all.

The average speed is about 144 km/h, which is similar to that of some HST's running in Western Europe.
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Old March 18th, 2012, 07:08 PM   #32
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Yep, it's quite good for a conventional line (which I never denied), but it's definitely not "High speed rail" (even if the train would allow for that) as that would mean more than 200kph speed according to the most conservative definitions.

On the other hand, of course, there is that 35km stretch of new line which apparently allows for 250kph. So, Uzbekistans high speed network is nowadays 35km long, but that probably doesn't make much of a difference for the traveller.
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Old March 18th, 2012, 08:44 PM   #33
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Thanks all for your interest in my thread. For the user XAN from Ukraine, I want to say that I first heard that in Ukraine there are high-speed trains. Perhaps it is. Only here in Ukraine, he apparently develops only 160. But in Uzbekistan develops if it is necessary above.

I have nothing against it.
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Old March 18th, 2012, 08:48 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thun View Post
Yep, it's quite good for a conventional line (which I never denied), but it's definitely not "High speed rail" (even if the train would allow for that) as that would mean more than 200kph speed according to the most conservative definitions.

On the other hand, of course, there is that 35km stretch of new line which apparently allows for 250kph. So, Uzbekistans high speed network is nowadays 35km long, but that probably doesn't make much of a difference for the traveller.
That's your opinion. Nevertheless, the Government fully support the further development of such a highway with such modern trains.
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Old March 18th, 2012, 08:54 PM   #35
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i didn't know that Özbekistan have HSR too,
good progress
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Old March 18th, 2012, 09:17 PM   #36
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i didn't know that Özbekistan have HSR too,
good progress
Thank you
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Old March 19th, 2012, 02:31 PM   #37
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That's your opinion. Nevertheless, the Government fully support the further development of such a highway with such modern trains.
Citi, the "ghost" in this discussion (which has also shown up on other boards) is the fact that those of us who have a European slant tend to align ourselves with the only authoritative definition ever attempted of HS. It is by the EU Commission and it is "authoriative" mostly in the sense that it sets the limits for what the EU is willing to support as HS lines under its TEN programme. Since Uzbekistan is obviously not an EU member, you may accept or dismiss the definition as you please.

According to EU standards high-speed denotes, primarily, newly built track for operating speeds of at least 250 km/h. Secondarily, upgraded conventional track for speeds of at least 200 km/h may also be considered as HS. There is a also a third implicit threshold: 160 km/h, which is the highest operating speed allowed for trains using conventional signalling equipment. (It is surprisingly expensive to upgrade line speeds from 160 km/h to 200 km/h because you have to provide computerised signalling on the entire line and in all trains.) Operating speeds beneath 160 km/h I think most of us would not consider as high-speed .
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Old March 19th, 2012, 02:36 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by hans280 View Post
Citi, the "ghost" in this discussion (which has also shown up on other boards) is the fact that those of us who have a European slant tend to align ourselves with the only authoritative definition ever attempted of HS. It is by the EU Commission and it is "authoriative" mostly in the sense that it sets the limits for what the EU is willing to support as HS lines under its TEN programme. Since Uzbekistan is obviously not an EU member, you may accept or dismiss the definition as you please.

According to EU standards high-speed denotes, primarily, newly built track for operating speeds of at least 250 km/h. Secondarily, upgraded conventional track for speeds of at least 200 km/h may also be considered as HS. There is a also a third implicit threshold: 160 km/h, which is the highest operating speed allowed for trains using conventional signalling equipment. (It is surprisingly expensive to upgrade line speeds from 160 km/h to 200 km/h because you have to provide computerised signalling on the entire line and in all trains.) Operating speeds beneath 160 km/h I think most of us would not consider as high-speed .
So, how to define railways for speeds 170 to 240 km/h?
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Old March 19th, 2012, 04:50 PM   #39
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Citi, the "ghost" in this discussion (which has also shown up on other boards) is the fact that those of us who have a European slant tend to align ourselves with the only authoritative definition ever attempted of HS. It is by the EU Commission and it is "authoriative" mostly in the sense that it sets the limits for what the EU is willing to support as HS lines under its TEN programme. Since Uzbekistan is obviously not an EU member, you may accept or dismiss the definition as you please.

According to EU standards high-speed denotes, primarily, newly built track for operating speeds of at least 250 km/h. Secondarily, upgraded conventional track for speeds of at least 200 km/h may also be considered as HS. There is a also a third implicit threshold: 160 km/h, which is the highest operating speed allowed for trains using conventional signalling equipment. (It is surprisingly expensive to upgrade line speeds from 160 km/h to 200 km/h because you have to provide computerised signalling on the entire line and in all trains.) Operating speeds beneath 160 km/h I think most of us would not consider as high-speed .

Of course we can not compete with Europe. Do you at higher speeds. But the 170-220 km it is still much higher than the rate in the global rate. Check out Wikipedia. Uzbekistan is listed there is the 15th country with a high-speed railways
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Old March 19th, 2012, 09:16 PM   #40
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So, how to define railways for speeds 170 to 240 km/h?
If parts of a line are only useable at speeds of 170 km/h then, by the EU definition, the line may not normally be described as highspeed. The one exception from this is where a project involves the overcoming of a major bottleneck that used to slow the rail traffic disproportionally. In that case, speeds down to 160 km/h may be considered as HS. (Examples include the Channel Tunnel and the Danish/Swedish railway bridges, as well as outside the EU area the Swiss Loetschberg Tunnel.)

But, again: I'm just proffering an EU definition. I'm not offering any "universal solution" to the question of what is HS and what is not.
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