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Old November 9th, 2005, 10:54 AM   #241
carlo pontevedra
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sugbuanon

the church's altar



interior perspective



the world famous Loboc Children's Choir
Thank you, @sugbuanon, for those nice photos!
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Old November 9th, 2005, 12:51 PM   #242
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sugbuanon







Built of coral blocks and stucco-plastered bricks, the architecture is a unique combination of Gothic, Baroque and Oriental. Construction of the church was started in 1704 and completed in 1894. A few meters away is the coralstone belltower which served as observation post of the “Katipuneros” during the Philippine Revolution. Paoay Church is included in UNESCO’s World Heritage List.

Paoay is located west of Batac, southwest of Laoag City and north of Currimao. Situated 480 kilometers north of Manila and 23 kilometers south of Laoag City, it is bounded on the north by Laoag City and San Nicolas, on the south by Batac and Currimao, on the east by Batac, and on the west by the South China Sea.
wow! this church looks really good ... perhaps one of the best looking in the whole country. I like how it looks quite Asian and greens growing at the church itself gives a great feeling of history
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Old November 10th, 2005, 02:48 AM   #243
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PHILIPPINE COLONIAL CHURCH ARCHITECTURE

A Unique Flowering


Perhaps one of the most exciting yet tumultuous time in Philippine history is the Spanish colonial period. During this time, Western culture, education, government, economics, and lifestyle planted the seed of a new nation in Southeast Asia. When the Spaniards was finally expelled in 1899, they left behind a culture that was strongly indoctrinated with theirs. In architecture, the most distinct witness of the Spanish presence in the country are the hundreds of churches built all over the archipelago.
The flowering of colonial church architecture under the Spaniards was a unique event in the architectural heritage of the country. Unfortunately, the end of the Spanish regime was also the end of the church building enterprise of the missionaries. No one would ever witness a church to rise up again in the grandeur and spirit of the colonial era. In some sense, the churches are very special today because the mold was broken after they were created. But more specifically, they are very special because of the events and circumstances surrounding their creations. For today, their eclectic styles do not seem to fit into the characterization of western traditional church architecture. A person with a western orientation would never know where to begin in describing the aggregation of diverse styles of the churches. Colonial churches, explains Manila architect Augusto Villalon, may not be correct from a western point of view, but the indigenized styles are correct in their own setting. Indeed, the churches hardly impersonate European or Mexican models; instead, they seem to charm each other.

But what, in specific terms, makes Philippine colonial church architecture so unique from the realm of western traditional architecture? There are several diverse reasons; yet, each explanation seems to point back to the geographic location of the Philippines, the archipelago being a far-flung colonial outpost of the Spanish era.

A FAR-FLUNG OUTPOST.
There was no direct link between colonial Philippines and mother Spain. The colonization of the archipelago was accomplished only through New Spain or Mexico. Hence, colonizers were arriving directly from South America rather than from Europe. Considering how long it took to travel in those days, the archipelago was considered a far flung outpost of the Spanish regime. Not many conquistadors were up and ready to risk everything they had in the new colony; thus, most of those who arrived in the archipelago were ardent religious missionaries.

Perhaps, the early missionaries were too ecstatic to venture in a new territory that they missed to bring along with them an architect. As a result, there were no trained architects when it was time to build missionary churches. It was only in the latter part of the colonial period that architects began arriving in the colony. But for almost all of the great churches throughout the country, the design and style were executed by the Spanish missionaries and the local maestro-de-obras or master builders. Faced with the undoubting task of designing and building a church, the missionaries had to rely either on their memories of past encounters or illustrations of churches in the west.

The only link between Mexico and the new colony was the Galleon Trade. Alicia Coseteng, in her book Spanish Churches in the Philippines, explains how illustrations of an architectural trend, such as the Mexican Baroque that flourished in Mexico in 17th and 18th Century, reached the Philippines through the Galleon Trade between Manila and Acapulco. This is one reason why almost all of the colonial churches in the country have very strong Baroque tendencies.

The Galleon Trade between Manila and Acapulco was a very slow journey; the ship took about a year to reach its destination. Because of this, new architectural ideas and trends in the Philippines always lagged behind from the other colonies in South America. While this situation did not allow too much artistic leeway for the friars in their designs, the local artisans had ample time to develop their newly acquired skills. In time, the artisans began infusing their individualistic and often indigenous styles into the architecture. Although it was done with innocuous intentions, the rules of western traditional architecture were freely deviated.

A GATHERING OF ARTISANS.
The local artisans were a varied mixture of people. When building a church, the Indios, a reference to the natives at the time, contributed much of the needed labor force. The Filipinos were good builders of wood and bamboo, but they were unskilled in building with stone. Hence, Chinese laborers were hired when such a specific skill was required. Muslims were also recruited to render labor. In several churches in the south, this resulted in minaret-like belltowers with onion-shaped roofs, trefoil arches, and geometric patterns. One good example is the Carcar church in Cebu. Muslim influence also prevailed in the central north, as the Malate church in Manila illustrates. The gathering of artisans with different ethnic backgrounds plus the fact that Filipinos have a strong Malay heritage, eventually led to the infusion of non-western motifs into the architecture, further creating a distinct style. The facade of the Miag-ao church in Iloilo is an extreme example of how a western idea was transformed to suit the taste of the local artisans.

The church builders had to learn to build with what was available. In general, the early missionaries had very limited resources, in terms of financing as well as materials. This was further aggravated by the fact that they had to learn to build churches which can survive the onslaught of natural calamities prevalent in the new colony. These conditions led to many improvisations on both the friars and the local artisans. In the north, the massive buttresses of the Paoay church in Ilocos Norte are a reminder of the church builders’ struggle against earthquakes.

A CONTINUOUS BUILDING PROCESS.
Colonial church architecture in the country is distinctly unique because the churches are a mixture and accretion of different architectural styles. It was never a question whether the builders should tear down an old church to make way for a new one. That would have been very wasteful, considering the limited resources they had. When churches were rebuilt, they were often reconstructed over existing foundations or walls. As a result, the architectural style is usually a crossbreed of disparate sources. The Morong church in Rizal, however, displays how the integration of a new belfry with the old facade can create one of the most well-composed architectures in colonial Philippines.

Put together, geographic location, climate, materials, and the spontaneous and improvisational attitude of the Filipinos created a kind of architecture that give hint to western ideas yet unique enough to stand on its own. Traditional western architectural idioms were interpreted in ways that are suitable only to the Filipino taste. Through these processes, exceptional churches abound in all parts of the archipelago. In the north, the Tumauini church in Isabela is renown for its intricate brick ornamentation. Betis church in Pampanga has an exceptional trompe l’oiel interior that is seemingly second only to San Agustin church in Intramuros.

The church building enterprise of the Spanish missionaries also set significant world records in the evolution of architecture in this part of the world. Taal church in Batangas is the widest church in Asia, while San Sebastian church in Manila, perhaps the crowning glory of colonial church building in the country, is the first all-iron church in Asia. As a pre-fabricated steel structure, San Sebastian church is closely behind the structural feat of the Eiffel Tower in Paris.

Colonial churches have been a great source of inspiration for a long time. Painters and artists have often recreated the churches in their works; writers and lyricists have enigmatized the churches in their passionate endeavors (Who has not heard of Constancio de Guzman’s classic Lumang Simbahan?); modern-day architects often turn their back to the past to reorient themselves from the chaos of architectural ‘isms of today. But more than that, these edifices of faith have steered the course of the country and the Filipino people to where they are now. At times when the country struggled to unite itself and tried to recover from the devastation left by natural disasters, political instability, and economic mismanagement, the Filipino people, because of their strong religious faith, have managed to pick up themselves time and time again.

Besides their role as bastions of the Catholic faith, they are poised as living monuments and proud standing witness to the Filipino heritage. They are reminders of an era in the country’s colorful history. One can only hope that the churches will continue to exist for hundreds of years more to come.

http://www2.hawaii.edu/~gaspar/church-intro.html

Last edited by Animo; November 15th, 2005 at 12:29 AM.
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Old November 10th, 2005, 02:49 AM   #244
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Earthquake Baroque: Paoay Church in the Ilocos


The town of Paoay seem to be isolated from the rest of Ilocos Norte, so enclosed the town is surrounded by tall, old mango and acacia trees, that a newcomer would not know what to expect. Only the tip of the belltower exerting itself to the sky gives a hint of what lies beyond the fortress of trees.
At the end of the long, narrow road leading from the Manila highway to the town proper, the hundred-year-old Parish Church of Saint Augustine awaits silently, considered as one of the most striking edifices in the country with its huge buttresses flanking the sides and rear facade.


It has been a wonder how and why such huge wall reinforcement was ever fancied by the early church builders. Was it just another way of impressing the people by demonstrating the strength of the new religion--that is, Christianity--or was it just a result of the rivalry among Catholic church builders who were trying to outdo each other? The answer is more humbling and simpler.

Earthquake was, and still is, one of the most destructive natural calamities in the Philippines. This harsh reality is severely evident in the church building practices in the Ilocos. As a response to earthquakes, church builders devised means to make sure that the church held up against the fury of the earth. Wall buttressing was a promising solution because it required a simple building method and simple materials. In the case of Paoay church, however, the dreadful paranoia of church builders became the epitome of earthquake-resistant churches in the Ilocos region.


The church was started by the Augustinian Fr. Antonio Estavillo in 1694. It was completed in 1710 and rededicated in 1896, just three years before the expulsion of Spanish rule in the country. The style of the church has been dubbed “Earthquake Baroque” by Alicia Coseteng, one of the early authorities on colonial church architecture. Because the buttresses extend out considerably from the exterior walls, the entire visual experience becomes three-dimensional, unlike most of the churches in the country where the inherent beauty of the church is limited only at the facade.

The buttresses are a visual spectacle. One can easily imagine them as giant sentinels poised to protect the church from adversaries. The rhythmic flow of massive form cascading down from the pinnacles to the ground, emphasized by spiral relieves visible on each side of the buttresses, alludes to a Baroque character. Yet, the dark receding plaster and exposed coral stone wall, complete with foliage overgrowth, creates a momentary feeling of being in some exotic Javanese temple.

The materials used for the walls were a mixture of coral stone and bricks. Large coral stones were used at the lower level of the walls, while bricks, smaller and more manageable to transport, were used at the upper levels.

The mortar used for the coral stones and bricks dramatizes the desire of the builders to make sure that the church stood against natural calamities. The other ingredients added to the mortar were as exotic as the style of the church itself. Regalado Jose, in his book Simbahan, points out that leather straps were mixed with the mortar. Felipe M. de Leon, who wrote The Filipino Nation, adds that the “stucco was said to have been made by mixing sand and lime [with] sugarcane juice, which were boiled with mango leaves, leather, and rice straw for two nights.”


Another unusual idiosyncrasy that seems to be typical to many Ilocano churches is the existence of a step buttress at the sides of the church, at or near half of the length of the exterior wall. There seems to be no other reason for building this other than as a means to access the roof. In the early days, this would have been necessary when fixing or patching the cogon grass roof. What throws off everyone’s speculation is that the stair-like buttresses have steps that were built too steep and too far apart for a normal person to climb. But perhaps, they were built in such manner in order to save valuable space. If the step buttress on the left of the Paoay church was built properly, it would have jutted out far beyond the boundaries of the church fence.


The facade of the church, even as it is beginning to lean towards the front, still manages to be as equally impressive as the buttresses. Viewed from the side, the giant buttresses look like huge volutes making the facade appear as a massive pediment rising from the ground. The facade is divided vertically by square pilasters that extend from the ground and all the way to the top of the pediment. The Gothic affinity of the church is suggested by the vertical movement of the pilasters and the finials that cap them at the top of the pediment. The facade is also divided horizontally by stringed cornices that extend all the way to the edges. The cornices extend to the sides of the church and wrap each buttresses around, adding attention and articulation to the massive side supports. At the apex is a niche, while the otherwise stark plaster finish is embellished with crenallations, niches, rosettes, and the Augustinian coat-of-arms.


The facade is complemented with a belltower located at its right hand side. Belltowers are a very important element in the overall composition of colonial churches, both for its function and aesthetics. For practical purposes, belltowers were used as a communication device to the townspeople. In the case of the Paoay belltower, it also played, ironically, an explicit role in the lives of the Filipinos during the war.


Climbing the belltower is almost like going back in time. Inside, the musty smell of coral stone, coupled with rotting wood scaffoldings and stairs, relives the dark days of the Katipuneros when they climbed up and down the shaft and used the belltower as a lookout during the revolt against the Spaniards.

The view from the top of the belltower is absolutely magnificent. On one side, one can roam with his or her eyes the vast span of land until it merges with the China Sea. In some sense, it is still used today as a lookout point, not by the Katipuneros, but by mischievous kids from the nearby high school who often flee from the wrath of an angry teacher.


As one enters the edifice, the church abruptly relinquishes the powerful strength of the massive buttresses that they discharge at the exterior. Inside, the church has a very solemn, almost sentimental ambiance. The interior looks bare and empty. Regalado Jose mentions in his book that the ceiling was once painted with a scene similar to that of the Sistine Chapel in Italy. Unfortunately, the original ceiling is no longer in existence today. What is left is a cavernous maze of trusswork with exposed and rusting corrugated roof sheets.

Compared to its still magnificent exterior, the Paoay church looks austere and stark inside, with but a few old images of saints and a simple wooden cross at the altar, that it is hard to imagine now how it looked like a hundred years ago. Only on Sundays does the Parish enjoy quite a number of worshippers. It is sad to think that on any other day, except for an intermittent bus loads of Taiwanese tourists, the church suffers from the lack of patronage.

It is impossible not to be compelled by the exotic quality of the church, as demonstrated by the huge and powerful buttresses. Yet, there is also a sense of humility behind such exuberant assertion, as expressed by the pensive interior. But the most enduring impression, perhaps, that any visitor takes with him as he departs from the church, are the poignant memories of a tumultuous yet glorious past of a nation, imbedded among the layers and heaps of huge stones and bricks that make a church.


http://www2.hawaii.edu/~gaspar/paoay.html

Last edited by Animo; November 15th, 2005 at 12:29 AM.
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Old November 10th, 2005, 02:49 AM   #245
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Flowers in Brick: The Tumauini Church in Isabela


Jewel of the Valley.” This is how Benito Legarda calls the Parish Church of Saint Mathias in his inquiry, Angels in Clay: The Typical Cagayan Church. Its exquisite brick ornamentation makes this church in Isabela one of the most striking and interesting churches built during the Spanish colonial period.
The church stands in a quiet little corner of the town, away from the mad rush hour of everyday life, at the end of a short, narrow, uneven asphalt track that diverts unobtrusively from the main road of Tumauini, a bustling little town where every mode of transportation- cars, jeepneys, buses, tricycles, bicycles, calesas- claim a stake to the same road. Tumauini is located in the northern part of Isabela, only an hour-and-a-half drive away from Tuguegarao in the Cagayan Valley.


Tumauini church was built by Fr. Domingo Forto from 1783 to 1788. With a keen eye to details and an affection to decoration, Fr. Forto created a work of art in his church. To achieve the ornamentation he wanted, he went as far as importing artisans from Pampanga to carve the wood moldings for the clay insets. Likewise, he devised an ingenious method that assured him that the laborers followed exactly his design, especially when he went away on missionary travels. A closer look at the spiral relief of the facade shows carved out numbers that indicate the proper sequence of the bricks. Some of the bricks were even stamped with a date; one brick displays the year "1784".


Paired pseudo-Corinthian columns on the facade create a vertical rhythmic division, perhaps inspired by native foliage. Directly above an arched doorway in the central portion of the facade, a niche for a statuette precariously sits within the heavy laden horizontal cornice. Two larger niches, set in between paired columns, flank each side of the doorway. Another horizontal cornice traverses along the lower portion of the facade, demarcating a solid base for the entire composition.


The abundant ornamentation is seemingly overwhelming to the untrained eyes that it is easy to miss the fine details that give life to the facade. Perhaps, one must take moments of repose to scan the wealth of each red clay brick and discover trimmings of flowers, foliage, swags and angel faces. Some ornamentation are so subtle that discerning their meanings or allusions could bring a sense of fulfillment. For example, the columns that frame the side niches are faintly shaped just enough to suggest solomonic or twisted columns.

On the other hand, it is perplexing, almost impossible, to draw any meaning from some other ornamentation. For instance, one can only guess the significance of carriage wheel images at the base of the facade.

[IMG] [/IMG]

Possibly the most intriguing of all the ornaments are the odd-looking clay insets that bound the sides of the facade. These insets come to life as curvilinear forms that seem to crawl on the surface of the wall. Shaped like a reversed letter “S” or the number “3”, they could have originally signified some important message or idea that is now lost to an observer. The brick walls remain silent and they won’t tell the story.

The proliferation of ornaments on the facade is crowned by a pediment with stepped pinnacles on both sides. The stepped pinnacles are embellished with more clay insets varying from flowers to a coil. The pediment itself is also uncommon, being the only pediment in the colonial church lineage that has a very strong circular form. It is punctuated with a rose window that is decorated with a dazzling movement of swag-like ornaments.


Besides its brick inset ornamentation, the church is also exceptional among the colonial churches because of its unusual exposed brick construction. Unlike most timeworn churches, Tumauini church lacks a protective coating of plaster on its walls. One can assume that bricks in Tumauini were made durable enough to last natural elements as well as the passage of time.

To complete the composition, a belltower resolutely stands close to the facade. Built in 1803, the belltower is a rare gem, too. According to Winand Klassen, in his book Architecture in the Philippines, the Tumauini belltower is the only known cylindrical tower in the colonial period. The belltower's cylindrical shape reinforces its kinship with the circular composition of the pediment. Like the facade, it is festively decorated with festoon garlands that wrap around each tier of the belltower. Here, the embellishment is magnified by the effective contrast of the reddish clay insets against the white plaster finish.


The happy gathering of brick ornaments extends into the church interior. Above the altar, a half canopy that is made of stone and carved with delicate ornaments becomes the central focus. The half canopy is unprecedented within the context of this brick church since stone, according to Legarda, was rarely used in this region.

The book, Great Churches of the Philippines, sums up the brick ornamentation of the church: “An ultra-Baroque church, it is unique for its extensive use of baked clay both for wall finishes and for ornamentation. In the construction of Western-style churches, clay is an off-beat idiom. It is structural slang!”

Surely, Tumauini church is an amalgam within the realms of Western traditional architecture. But the Parish Church of Saint Mathias is not in the west, or anywhere else. It is in the busy little town of Tumauini in Isabela. Here, the church contentedly awaits the next visitor to come and relish its wonderful architecture.

http://www2.hawaii.edu/~gaspar/tumaui.html

Last edited by Animo; November 15th, 2005 at 12:34 AM.
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Old November 10th, 2005, 06:09 AM   #246
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Santo Rosario Church/Cathedral in Angeles City.
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Old November 14th, 2005, 03:48 PM   #247
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sorry co-forumers napabayaan ko yung thread.

anyway, thanks to all for keeping this thread alive with discussion, great pictures, illustrations and researches, and comments. ang haba na ng list natin!

from page 01-25 (13 ata sa iba) hanggang post ni culiat

philippine churches and other places of worship


albay:
cagsawa church/ruins/park
our lady of the gate (daraga town church), daraga
santo domingo church, santo domingo
camalig church, camalig
tabaco church, tabaco city
st stephen church, ligao city

batangas:
saint martin basilica, taal

bohol:

our lady of the immaculate conception (baclayon church), baclayon
san pedro church, loboc
marami pa (unidentified pics by JudeD. help boholanos)

bulacan:

barasoain church (our lady of mount carmel parish), malolos

camarines:

basilica minore, naga city
metropolitan cathedral, naga city
franciscan monastery, naga city
penafrancia shrine, naga city

cebu:
basilica minore del santo nino (santo nino church), cebu city
+basilica minore del santo nino pilgrim center, cebu city
saint catherine of alexandria, carcar
redemptorist church
pardo parish church, cebu city

dumaguete:
dumaguete church*

ilocos:
paoay church, batac

iloilo:
molo church, molo*
jaro cathedral, jaro*
university church, central philippine university

laguna:
church of saint bartholomew, nagcarlan

metro manila:

church of the gesu, admu campus, marikina
saint joseph parish (bamboo organ church), las pinas
san sebastian church, quiapo, manila
golden mosque, quiapo, manila
hong giam taoist temple, paco, manila
khalsa diwan indian sikh temple, paco, manila
minor basilica of the black nazarene (quiapo church), quiapo, manila*
san agustin church, intramuros, manila*
nuestra senora de gracia parish (guadalupe ruins), makati
nature church, moonwalk village, las pinas*
nuestra senora de los remedios (malate church), malate, manila*
iglesia ni cristo (main chapel), diliman, quezon city*
minor basilica of the immaculate conception (manila cathedral), intramuros, manila
san miguel parish, san miguel, manila
santissimo rosario parish (ust chapel), sampaloc, manila
shine of jesus the way, the truth, the life, bay city complex
santa cruz church (blessed sacrament), santa cruz, manila
minor basilica of san lorenzo ruiz (binondo church), binondo, manila
saint james the great, ayala alabang
san jose church, navotas
santo domingo church, ??

negros:
church of san diego (silay church), silay*

pampanga:
lubao main church, lubao*
san luis church*
san guillermo parish church, bacolor
holy rosary parish church, angeles city

pangasinan:

our lady of manaoag, manaoag

rizal:
antipolo church, antipolo

siquijor:
siquijor church, siquijor*
siquijor convent



+agustinian churches from the book angels in stone scanned by jbkayaker12

illustrations only and ??
??san clemente seminary
san juan de dios monastery
santo domingo, manila
the jesuit church

*the ones with asterisk do not have any info. anyone can contribute here.

wee. it's good that we have more forumers from other parts of the philippines now. the problem before kasi was most of the pinoys are either outside the country or in manila that's why there's a scarcity of info and new pics (most of available stuff in the internet are old). but now we even have threads for different provinces and cities. and it's really cool.

and also a good number of our forumers today are pro/amateur photographers, hobbyist, travelers who have cameras (even digicams).

ok. so ayun. i'll try to post some later.
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Old November 14th, 2005, 04:07 PM   #248
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Lanao del Sur





Maguindanao



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Old November 14th, 2005, 04:17 PM   #249
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wow great pix!!! thanx for sharing them sleepwalker..
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Old November 14th, 2005, 04:57 PM   #250
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nice pics kuya. may iba-ibang pangalan rin ba mga mosque nila or sa pangalan nung lugar lang rin kinukuha?
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Old November 15th, 2005, 12:47 AM   #251
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A Painter's Dream: Betis Church in Pampanga


Of the many churches built during the Spanish colonial period, the Parish Church of Saint James the Great in Betis, Pampanga stands as one of few that celebrates the Pampangenos’ artistic skill.


By car, Betis, Pampanga is less than an hour’s drive away from Manila. That is, if there is no lahar in the outlying vicinity. Mudflow from Mt. Pinatubo has wantonly gorged out parts of the road leading to Betis that traffic can get as bad as the end-of-the-day mad rush at EDSA. Once in the town, however, the flurry of traffic calms down, and the journey halts to a simple, quiet place, invigorated only by the presence of a white-washed church.

Betis is a small town. The plaza fronting the church is still a gathering place for the people, perhaps, just like in the olden days. Modest in size and style, the church seems to reflect the simplicity and reticence of the town. The construction was started by Fr. Fernando Pinto in 1660 and, after one hundred years, it was finally completed in 1770 by Fr. Jose dela Cruz.


The facade of the Betis church is not unlike other colonial churches in the country. The book, Great Churches of the Philippines, describes the facade of the church: “Rendered in stone, stucco, and timber the church draws inspiration from disparate sources and brings them together without any trace of disharmony. The facade calls to mind the delicacy of Wedgewood ceramic, save that the appliquéd white motifs are Baroque instead of the traditional Classical cameos. These appliqués achieve the fineness of filigree, in the teardrops and ribband above the rose window of the pediment, and in the espejito de mano (hand mirror designs) on the side panels of the second level.”

The various architectural elements on the facade, including the whimsical scrolls at the pediment, all usher to strong Baroque allusions. Almost all. A later addition, the portico at the main doorway regresses back to a Renaissance style.


The rather refined and subdued character of the facade, however, does not bespeak the architecture that lies behind the heavy and intricately carved wooden doors of the church. If the visitor’s quest is to find a lasting impression of the church, then all the person has to do is enter its doors. The caller soon finds out that Betis church happens to be one of few that have the most splendid interiors among the colonial church lineage.

The experience begins immediately at the main entrance, below the choirloft, where the faux-covered ceiling becomes the prologue for the visual and tactile extravagance of the interior. Here, a painting of Jesus as a shepherd occupies the central portion of the ceiling. But the fascination here is short-lived, since the lavish trompe l’oiel of the nave’s ceiling is clearly visible at this vantage, and one can not help but to be drawn deeper into the church’s interior.

The wooden ceiling of the nave is essentially flat, except where it curves down slightly to meet the side walls. Perhaps, the painter must have compared the ceiling to a huge canvass, albeit it was turned upside down. Here, the vast ceiling is broken down to a comprehensible scale by faux coffers that are embroidered with foliage, swirls and curves. In the midst of the ceiling are quatrefoil- framed religious scenes, one occupying most of the space. Images of saints and angels, with equally impressive trompe l’oiel, highlight the edges of the ceiling.


From the ceiling, the explosion of colors gradually recedes down to follow the vertical rhythm set by the super-imposed half-round columns along the side walls of the church. Even the vertical ribbings of the columns are painted; still, the three-dimensional effect is convincing.

The picturesque interior is refined by natural light that cordially enters through rose and rectangular windows that puncture between the columns. The rose windows are bordered with ornate plaster, while carved wooden valances accentuate the lower rectangular windows. The decoration is consistently carried at each bay of the wall. Where the wall bears no rose or valance window, it is nonetheless painted with faux windows in order to sustain the same poetry. The wall decorations also include faux paintings, complete with faux guild frames. The effect of chiaroscuro makes these objects come to life.


The visual spectacle intensifies at the crossing. Here, the interior opens up to an octagonal dome. Like the rest of the church, the dome was not spared from the painter’s zealous brush. The dome depicts a heavenly scene of clouds and religious images that are lit by natural light entering through the windows of the drum. The four piers that hold up the dome are also profusely ornamented. Each pier is painted with one of the four evangelists, similar to many western traditional churches.

The extravagance of the church finally climaxes at the retablo. The heavily guilded altar is a dazzling feat and a celebration of the carving skills of the Pampango artisans. Slender Corinthian columns, some with twisted base, divide the retablo vertically, while cornices divide it horizontally into three tiers. The altar is decorated with cherubs, flora, sunfaces, and stars, along with niches containing statues of saints. The shimmer of ornamental gild radiates from the retablo’s white background.


Simon Flores, a local artist, is credited for the original interior painting of Betis church. It is noted in the book Great Churches of the Philippines that Flores’ passion for profuse decoration was inspired by the San Agustin church in Intramuros. However, subsequent retouches over the years have complicated the original character of the paintings.

Betis church is a rare treasure in the Pampanga province. It embodies the bold and exuberant skills of the local artisans. As a religious and historic edifice, the church has survived hundreds of years. One can only hope that, unlike the neighboring towns, the church will never have to face the dreadful threat of lahar.

http://www2.hawaii.edu/~gaspar/betis.html
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Old November 15th, 2005, 03:35 AM   #252
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cebu daily news

Restoration of Boljoon church to start next year

by Jason A. Baguia


The Patrocinio de Santa Maria church in Boljoon would undergo "emergency" restoration works beginning next year to save its coral-stone walls that have been weakened by countless temblors that hit the town in the past 399 years, a provincial official said Sunday. Architect Melva Rodriguez-Java, provincial heritage consultant, said the repairs on the church walls comprise the first stage of a massive effort to save the whole structure. On Sunday, the Cebu provincial government and the Archdiocese of Cebu signed a memorandum of agreement (MOA) that allowed the Capitol to fund the restoration works of the centuries-old Patrocinio de Maria church in Boljoon, a town southeast of Cebu City. The agreement was signed by Cebu Archbishop Ricardo Cardinal Vidal and Cebu Governor Gwendolyn Garcia at the end of a morning mass.

Governor Garcia pledged P3 million as initial funding for the undertaking. Java will supervise the actual works. The church is the only structure in Cebu declared a "National Cultural Treasure" by the National Museum. The church was also declared by the National Historical Institute (NHI) a national historical landmark. Boljoon Mayor Deogenes Derama, who witnessed the MOA signing with parish priest Sofronio de la Peña, announced that the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA) has also allocated P2 million for restoring the 399-year-old structure. Vidal said it was only proper that restoration works for old churches in the archdiocese begin with the Patrocinio de Maria because it is the only one "at par with other national treasures elsewhere in the country." Before imparting the final benediction, Vidal urged pilgrims and parishioners to defend the church whose icons have been made target of frequent thefts.

Governor Garcia, for her part, asked Boljoon residents to complement the restoration project in their own way. According to estimates from the municipality and the Provincial Tourism and Heritage Council (PTHC), the actual restoration cost would range from P20 million to P37 million. Garcia said that the participation of the provincial government in the restoration project is a matter of public safety. Part of the MOA read: "The church is in a serious state of deterioration and disrepair, with its ceiling, roof beams, walls and buttresses severely damaged by elements caused by past temblors, which renders the whole church unsafe for the public." Under the agreement, the archdiocese allows the province to conduct "restoration, conservation, and preservation work on the church based on internationally accepted norms," and in line with the laws set by the Catholic Church.
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Old November 15th, 2005, 12:23 PM   #253
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weirdo
nice pics kuya. may iba-ibang pangalan rin ba mga mosque nila or sa pangalan nung lugar lang rin kinukuha?
i think iba-iba rin ang pangalan. ang iba naman nakasulat in arabic with translation sa baba. di ko lang nakuha for those pics.
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Oh you're from Davao, the land of durian. Sorry, here in _ _ _, we don't eat durian; we only eat chocolates! (nya diay sourced from Davao gihapon inyong cacao nga gikaon)
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Old November 15th, 2005, 03:39 PM   #254
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Quiapo church then and now
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Old November 15th, 2005, 03:46 PM   #255
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new paint job huh? thanx for the pics wonderboy..
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Old November 15th, 2005, 04:05 PM   #256
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Quiapo church then and now[/QUOTE]

oh no what have they done to Quiapo Church?!!
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Old November 15th, 2005, 04:42 PM   #257
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some churches in metro cebu













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Old November 15th, 2005, 05:29 PM   #258
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drfeelgood17


Quiapo church then and now
oh no what have they done to Quiapo Church?!! [/QUOTE]

drfeelgood17, I believe Quiapo Church is not under the rules of UNESCO and NCCA, thus, alteration of the original color of the facade is possible. I'm not sure though if the city of Manila is doing something about this. The 'bagong luma' color just doesn't work.
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Old November 22nd, 2005, 01:51 PM   #259
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are there any baroque churches at all in Mindanao?
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Old November 22nd, 2005, 03:20 PM   #260
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Manila street scene showing church in the background, 1899-1901

Does anyone know what church is this?
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