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Old January 30th, 2015, 05:05 PM   #321
LCIII
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruffhauser View Post
From todays DJC.

http://www.djc.com/news/re/12074291.html

January 30, 2015

New York developer eyeing tower on 5th
By JOURNAL STAFF

A New York-based firm called Douglaston Development may be the latest to join Seattle's building bonanza.

City records show Douglaston is considering putting a 50-story hotel, residential and retail complex at 1933 Fifth Ave., where the Icon Grill now sits. Current plans call for 360 units, including apartments and 155 hotel rooms, as well as 200 parking spaces.

Representatives of Douglaston did not return a phone call requesting comment.

Perkins + Will appears to be working on the project, according to city records.

Douglaston's project would be on the same block where Stanford Hotels Corp. wants to build a 50-story hotel, apartment and condo complex. The Stanford site is at 1903 Fifth Ave.

Douglaston and Stanford aren't the only ones building big hotels in the Denny Triangle. With the proximity to Amazon.com's new campus, and the possibility of an expansion at the Washington State Convention Center, this area has become a hotbed for hotel development.

Here's a look at some of the other hotel projects in the neighborhood:

• 1821 Boren Ave. Touchstone Corp. is building Hill7, which will have a 14-story, 222-room Hilton Garden Inn and an 11-story office building. The hotel is scheduled to open this year.

• 924 Howell St. Stonebridge Cos., which was close to landing the site on Fifth Avenue where Stanford's project will be, is planning a 17-story Residence Inn by Marriott with 309 rooms.

• 9th and Stewart R.C. Hedreen Co. is planning the largest hotel in the neighborhood. It will be either 41 stories with about 1,650 rooms or 45 stories with about 1,260 rooms, depending on whether the city grants Hedreen an alley vacation.

• 2116 Fourth Ave. Lobsang Dargey's Path America is constructing the 40-story Potala Tower Seattle, with a 142-room Hotel Indigo and 339 housing units.

• 1121 Stewart St. RBF Property Group and GIS International Group are planning a skinny 42-story hotel and condo tower.

Douglaston's website says it has three companies: Douglaston Development, Levine Builders and Clinton Management, all led by Jeffrey Levine.

It says over the past seven years Douglaston has completed projects valued at $1.5 billion including 3,000 apartments, 2 million square feet of retail and 500 hotel rooms in New York City, and senior housing in the southwest.

One of the company's major projects is a 1 million-square-foot, mixed-use complex called The Edge, on a seven-acre site along the East River in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn.

The Edge has 565 condos in two towers, 347 affordable units in two mid-rises, as well as open space, a public esplanade and a water taxi pier.

Another hotel...
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Old February 4th, 2015, 05:51 PM   #322
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pan fried by CRAIG3RS, on Flickr
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Old February 4th, 2015, 11:13 PM   #323
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I'm so much in love with Seattle!
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Old February 7th, 2015, 02:06 PM   #324
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Old February 9th, 2015, 06:43 AM   #325
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pan fried by CRAIG3RS, on Flickr
Such a great panorama to get the scale of Seattle's core development.
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Old February 9th, 2015, 09:20 PM   #326
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970 Denny drawings


970 Denny
by dr, on Flickr


970 Denny
by dr, on Flickr


970 Denny
by dr, on Flickr


970 Denny
by dr, on Flickr


970 Denny
by dr, on Flickr


970 Denny
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970 Denny
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970 Denny Way design
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Old February 10th, 2015, 04:26 AM   #327
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^It is hard to tell anything about the material quality of a building from a Sketchy style Sketchup design, but that is a nice design overall!
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186 Newark, NJ Development projects MAPPED
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Old February 11th, 2015, 10:01 AM   #328
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^It is hard to tell anything about the material quality of a building from a Sketchy style Sketchup design, but that is a nice design overall!
Best we got so far. Anything over a certain size has to go thru at least 2 design reviews (Early Design guidance and Recommendation). The 970 Denny tower is only at EDG which is where final configuration and massing of the building is approved. Recommendation is where details are determined like exterior materials.
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Old February 12th, 2015, 06:05 PM   #329
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I can't wait to see the city on my own eyes in one month Awesome thread and developments.
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Old February 12th, 2015, 10:14 PM   #330
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For that view, go to Gas Works Park at the north end of Lake Union.
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Old February 17th, 2015, 09:51 PM   #331
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image by LCCIII, on Flickr

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Old February 23rd, 2015, 12:44 AM   #332
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Remind Me by John Westrock, on Flickr

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Old February 24th, 2015, 04:48 AM   #333
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New 400 Dexter Complex Adding Height, Keeping the Clock



Quote:
Alexandria Real Estate and architect CollinsWoerman presented their plans for 400 Dexter for recommendation to the design review board last night. Those plans call for the demolition of three existing single-story buildings to be replaced with a 12-story office building with 269,700 sq. ft. of office space, approximately 13,800 sq. ft. of retail and 457 below-grade parking spaces. They have goals to achieve minimum LEED Gold and keep in mind the pedestrian experience along Dexter, Harrison and Republican. The tall, canopied cover and a recessed ground level storefront provides an opportunity for outdoor, café-style seating. A plaza area on the south corner and a fifth floor open space give tenants and guests connection to the outside world. Perhaps most importantly, the iconic street clock on the corner will be refurbished and become a centerpiece of the new plaza.




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Old February 28th, 2015, 06:05 PM   #334
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First of four towers in new Amazon.com HQ topped out.

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February 27, 2015 Update
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Old March 2nd, 2015, 03:53 PM   #335
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The proposals just keep rolling in.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruffhauser View Post
From todays DJC.

http://www.djc.com/news/re/12075174.html

March 2, 2015

Two 40-story towers eyed for Minor Ave.
By JOURNAL STAFF

Crescent Heights Inspirational Living from Miami is looking at putting two 40-story apartment towers on the west side of Minor Avenue, between Virginia and Stewart streets in the Denny Triangle.

Last September, the company bought four parcels that make up almost half a block. It was unclear at the time what the company wanted to do with the land.

Crescent Heights recently told the DJC it is deciding on the “most appropriate plans.”

Crescent Heights has built high-rise apartments, condos, office projects and hotels in major coastal cities, and has offices in Miami, Chicago, New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco.

City records show Crescent Heights is considering two possible options: one would have 654 housing units and 15,000 square feet of retail; the other would have 880 units and 21,000 square feet of retail.

There would be five levels of underground parking.

The smaller project would be built on the four parcels that Crescent Heights bought last year.

The larger project would cover the entire half block. The city owns a parcel on the northern edge of the half block and Crescent Heights would have to acquire it to do the larger project.

Gensler is working with Crescent Heights on the project.

In a statement to the DJC, Crescent Heights said it is “committed to creating a project that embraces the neighborhood and its evolution while meeting the standard of creativity and forward thinking that is the hallmark of our urban residential work.”

Crescent Heights is one of several companies that are either planning or constructing high-rise housing projects in the Denny Triangle.

GID Development Group is working on two 41-story apartment projects on Lenora with a total of 751 units.

Security Properties recently started a 41-story tower with 356 units at 1823 Minor Ave.

Touchstone Corp. is planning a 37-story, 410-unit residential tower at 1812 Boren Ave. as part of the Tilt 49 complex.

Clise Properties is working on two high-rise towers with 900 housing units on Seventh Avenue between Bell and Battery streets. Clise is also planning a 39-story residential tower with 450 units at 2202 Eighth Ave.

Laconia Development wants to start construction late this year on a 43-story apartment tower with 400 units at 600 Wall St.

Douglaston Development of New York and Stanford Hotels Corp. of San Francisco are both planning 50-story mixed-use projects along Fifth Avenue with hotels and housing.

One of the first high-rise projects in the neighborhood was Bosa Development's twin 41-story condo towers. The 707-unit complex, Insignia, is under construction and the first building is expected to open this year. The other building should be done next year.

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Old March 5th, 2015, 06:14 PM   #336
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SEATTLE | 2301 7th | 40 Stories x2
Clise and Graphite Design Group have filed the following description of their plans for this half block with the city:

"Construct a mixed use building with approximately 21,000 sf of ground floor retail, 320 parking stalls above grade on 4 floors below approximately 181,000 sf commercial office on 5 floors and two residential towers with approximately 686 apartments. 540 car stalls below grade."


That seems like a lot of parking but Im happy about 2 more 440' towers for the Denny Triangle!
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Old March 11th, 2015, 06:48 PM   #337
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^And now our first look at that project:

http://web6.seattle.gov/dpd/edms/Get...DMS&id=2147675

Well, I appreciate at least they arent doing another cookie cutter Weber Thompson design. Ill have to see a more developed design to know for sure what I feel about it. Regardless, great improvement over current site conditions.
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Old March 26th, 2015, 04:18 PM   #338
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1901 Minor Ave:

Design - round 1: http://web6.seattle.gov/dpd/edms/Get...Docs&id=342932



Cresent Heights of Miami is proposing 2 towers with a total of 600 apartments and ground floor retail in the fast growing Denny Triangle neighborhood near Amazon.com's HQ.
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Old March 26th, 2015, 04:38 PM   #339
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruffhauser View Post
From todays DJC.

http://www.djc.com/news/ae/12076001.html?cgi=yes

March 26, 2015

This is Crescent Heights' smaller option: 39-story twin towers
By JOURNAL STAFF

A Miami developer called Crescent Heights Inspirational Living has filed preliminary plans with the city of Seattle for a pair of 39-story apartment towers at 1901 Minor Ave. in the Denny Triangle.

The site is on the west side of Minor Avenue, between Virginia and Stewart streets.

Gensler is the architect.

The plans just filed show the smaller of two proposals the developer is considering. Crescent Heights is trying to acquire a 14,400-square-foot city-owned parcel at the north end of the block that is could use to build a larger complex.

The smaller proposal calls for two 39-story towers containing about 600 apartments. The towers would share a podium, including three levels of below-grade parking for 458 vehicles.

Retail would total 8,700 square feet.

The image here is a massing study that shows the approximate size and volume of the project, but not the final design.

A city design-review board will have its first look at the plans during a meeting tentatively scheduled for 5:30 pm. June 2 in Seattle City Hall, Room L280.

The larger proposal would be two 40-story towers with 880 units, retail and five levels of underground parking. While the smaller project would not have residential units in the podium, the larger project would.

Minutes from a meeting last week with the architect, developer and city planners note the design team was encouraged by planners to work with structural engineer Magnusson Klemencic Associates to add some pizazz to the design.

“Dramatic design is encouraged in Denny Triangle,” the minutes say. “Most projects proposed there tend to be very basic and boxlike, with little relief.”

A design guidance meeting for the larger proposal is likely to be scheduled for a later date.
...
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Old March 26th, 2015, 06:13 PM   #340
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DEAL OF THE WEEK
J-Shaped Tower Looks to Lure Seattle Tech Firms
$600 million development also could lend spark to downtown’s core
By MAX TAVES
March 17, 2015 1:52 p.m. ET

Can Seattle developer Wright Runstad & Co. convince technology companies that a downtown skyscraper will make better office space than the hip lakefront neighborhood many of the firms now favor?

A lot is riding on the answer—about $600 million in development. In Seattle, as in many large cities, young, fast-growing technology companies often lease space in older, low-slung buildings in sometimes gritty parts of town, avoiding the tall towers built a generation ago and designed for very different tenants—namely, lawyers, bankers and accountants.

But Wright Runstad says the design of its planned building will impress the techies enough to convince them to move to city’s traditional financial district. The longtime Seattle developer’s plans for Rainier Square, unveiled last year and now awaiting final city approval, will span an entire city block and will feature a 58-story tower, a separate 12-story hotel as well as retail space. The first 40 floors of the tower are slated for 765,000 square feet of office space; 180 apartments will occupy the top 18 floors. If built as planned, the 849-foot tower will be Seattle’s second-tallest building.

What makes the building unusual is its shape, which resembles a ski jump, or even the letter “J,” with large bottom floors that narrow as the building rises. As a result, the building will have 27 different size floors. The wide base, with a 33,000 square-foot floor plate, would be significantly larger than most skyscrapers, whose floors are typically more than 25% smaller and rise uniformly from bottom to top.

The unorthodox form of Rainier Square’s planned tower is meant not only to help it stand out in a Seattle skyline better known for the iconic Space Needle, but to help Wright Runstad lure tech companies away from their comfort zones.

“Tech users have just expressed desire for larger floor plates, places where they can lay spaces very efficiently and ceilings that don’t make them feel claustrophobic,” says Greg Johnson, president of Wright Runstad.

Mindy Levine-Archer, an architect at NBBJ in charge of Rainier Square’s 1.15 million square foot design, says the tower’s large floor plates will allow for more interaction among employees, another factor tech companies appreciate. “The more people that are sharing the same contiguous space, the easier it is to build that critical culture,” she says.

The building’s highest office floors are significantly smaller compared with most skyscrapers. The developer and its architect say smaller floors of 13,600 square feet will appeal to younger, smaller companies, which can lease an entire floor rather than sharing it with other companies—something they couldn’t do in a typical building.

To create the large, unobstructed spaces that technology companies find appealing, Wright Runstad’s tower would, on many floors, place the elevators to one side rather than in the middle of the floor as in traditional towers.

The development is a $600 million bet on a part of Seattle that has trailed its local competitors for office tenants—and buzz.

The financial district is already home to satellite offices of companies such as Twitter Inc. and Amazon.com Inc.Zillow Group Inc. and digital food brand AllRecipes also have their headquarters in the area.

But so far, tech companies have overwhelmingly congregated in surrounding areas like Pioneer Square, Denny Triangle and, particularly, South Lake Union, a neighborhood north of downtown with the kind of eclecticism young tech workers like—think warehouses, urban lofts, parks, and bocce ball courts. Amazon is headquartered in this lakefront area about a mile north of downtown.

Getting technology firms to relocate or expand to offices downtown is beyond the control of one development project, no matter how big. Creative workers like “authentic urban environments—organically grown amenities that are not created just for them—a bar that’s been open for 50 years, authentic grit” says John Adams of global design firm Gensler. “They’re not just working in their offices. They’re working everywhere.”

Mr. Johnson of Wright Runstad says Rainier Square is within walking distance from Pike Place Market, one of the nation’s oldest and largest farmers’ markets, and will provide just that kind of lure. Architects at NBBJ say offering “distinctive and unique” retail is a central prong of their development plans.

To be sure, there is more at stake than just a new building. If Wright Runstad, whose development experience includes building the headquarters of Microsoft Corp. in Redmond, Wash., and the former headquarters of Amazon in south Seattle, can lure technology companies downtown, it could help jump-start the area’s revitalization.

“It’s the 50-yard line in downtown Seattle,” says Bruce Ganong of real estate-services firm HFF Inc., which is leading the developer’s efforts to raise about $250 million in equity for the project. “It’s a chance to redevelop the center of the city. It’s in the middle of where you want to be.”

Seattle’s downtown core lacks the kind of urban energy that some major American cities have, says John Lo, a managing director at brokerage JLL Inc. “The city has high-end shopping, but you don’t have a Union Square or a Times Square-type draw that a big city would typically have,” says Mr. Lo, who says he’s optimistic that Rainier Square could help provide that. “To be a vibrant 24-hour city, you not only need office and residential but also retail.”

http://www.wsj.com/articles/j-shaped...rms-1426614763

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