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Supertalls Discussions of projects under construction between 300-599m/1,000-1,999ft tall.
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Old January 28th, 2015, 02:29 AM   #1821
Wbino49
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No way those balconies could have that low of a barrier.........Cary and Sophia appear to be hesitating on approach.....lol
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Old January 28th, 2015, 08:57 AM   #1822
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Old January 28th, 2015, 05:27 PM   #1823
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Otie View Post
There are some fresh new renderings coming soon!
I wonder if there is more to come or the ones posted the other day are it.
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Old January 28th, 2015, 07:09 PM   #1824
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Am I the only one who is getting an Art-Deco Vibe from this tower's design?
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Old January 28th, 2015, 09:20 PM   #1825
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i love the art deco vibe very new york.
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Old January 31st, 2015, 06:24 PM   #1826
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I've read several times that these ultra skinny towers are only made possible through recent advancements in skyscraper technologies, but it was never actually mentioned what those breakthroughs are - besides some vague descriptions of faster elevators but I'm not really smarter than before, so maybe someone of you guys could shed some light for me.
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Old January 31st, 2015, 09:32 PM   #1827
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lepringlesface View Post
I've read several times that these ultra skinny towers are only made possible through recent advancements in skyscraper technologies, but it was never actually mentioned what those breakthroughs are - besides some vague descriptions of faster elevators but I'm not really smarter than before, so maybe someone of you guys could shed some light for me.
it's mainly architectural creativity rather than technological advancement. The current holder of the world's most slender tower (by height/width ratio) in Hong Kong (Highclliff Tower, ~250m) was designed before 2000.
432 Park avenue, for example, was designed with windowless floors to help decrease sway by directing winds through the building rather than have them crashing against the side.
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Old January 31st, 2015, 10:07 PM   #1828
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The biggest advancement has been in the strength of concrete, which some have cited as being a direct response to 9/11. The designers of 1 WTC set out to make it the strongest office building in the world, and in doing so developed a formula for concrete that's nearly twice as strong as what had been the standard. That technology has then been adapted to super tall and skinny towers (in addition to other more superficial discoveries, like faceted surfaces to break up wind vortices, and mass dampers becoming basically standard).

So, inadvertently, the terrorists set off a skyscraper revolution.
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Old February 3rd, 2015, 02:18 PM   #1829
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What is the measure of concrete strength ? How is it defined ?

How strong is WTC:s and modern supertalls concrete compared to past structures and skyscrapers ?
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Old February 3rd, 2015, 06:15 PM   #1830
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What is the measure of concrete strength ? How is it defined ?

How strong is WTC:s and modern supertalls concrete compared to past structures and skyscrapers ?
My understanding is pretty rudimentary, and a structural or chemical engineer would probably be able to get into it in deeper detail, but at a super basic level, we're talking about "compressive strength" as measured in pounds-per-square-inch (PSI). This Real Estate Weekly article from 2011 digs into the specifics:

Quote:
Typically, the high-strength concrete used in skyscraper cores (in the 1990’s) would have a compressive strength of 8,000 to 10,000 pounds per square inch (psi). Because Trump World Tower is a rather slender high-rise, WSP Cantor Seinuk specified concrete compressive strength of 12,000psi for the first time in New York City.

“On One World Trade Center WSP Cantor Seinuk’s engineers worked on specifying the compressive strength and modulus of elasticity,” says Marcus. “But we needed even higher compressive strength—14,000 psi—for the taller One World Trade building.”
So it's maybe a slight exaggeration to say One WTC was twice as strong as the standard (which was between 8,000-10,000 PSI, with the highest to date being 12,000), but easily a third to a half stronger, at least in terms of PSI. One of the commenters pointed out that the technology is called "iCrete," which you can read more about here.

The original article goes on to posit:

Quote:
Mr. Yoram Eilon, Vice President of WSP Cantor Seinuk agrees. “This product will probably lead to fairly wide use of 15,000-to-16,000 psi concrete,” he says. “And that will in turn create new structural opportunities for future high-rise buildings and bring higher value to this form of construction.
I don't know that we've seen 15,000 or 16,000 PSI yet, but I believe 111 W. 57th and 432 Park both use 14,000 PSI concrete.

There's more to it than just PSI, though, including shear strength, flexibility, and lots of stuff I don't really understand. That article does mention that One WTC (along with 7 WTC) helped solidify the use of cast-in-place, steel-reinforced concrete, as basically standard practice, which I believe has a lot to do with flexibility (on the West Coast, it's basically essential in earthquake-proofing designs).

I'd suggest giving those articles an in-depth read.

This Architectural Record article goes on to describe several more nuances of the advancement in supertall / super-skinny buildings (concrete and otherwise), including:

Quote:
Fly ash, a byproduct of coal combustion, is increasingly used to replace a large portion of Portland cement in these mixes, because it offers strength without the substantial heat normally generated during cement-curing, which can cause cracking.
Quote:
The simplest tactic to combat [wind oscillation] forces is to add weight, especially at the top of the building, but that's just a first step. The engineer must engage the building's entire structural system by strengthening the connection of the core to the perimeter columns and shear walls. To stiffen 111 West 57th Street, WSP thickened the shear walls that run the full length of the east and west exterior walls to as much as 3 feet, and linked them to the core with deep beams.
Quote:
The building's 15½-foot floor-to-floor heights ... coincides with the maximum code-permitted run of the exit stairs. That allows the floor space given over to the core to be minimized, especially as the two required exit routes are nested atop each other in a “scissor” configuration.
Quote:
The exterior of Viñoly's 432 Park Avenue is structural poured-in-place concrete that acts as a tube. (With white cement and careful attention to forming, the tube is also the finished architectural surface.) Even with monumental 10-foot-square windows, the tube is stiff enough to permit a 30-foot column-free zone between the exterior and the central core.
Quote:
At 53 West 53rd Street, Nouvel aligns the elevators and stairs along the west wall, where the building abuts an office tower. Marcus says the structure “relies very little on the core” because of the extremely stiff concrete diagrid exterior that slopes to a pinnacle at 1,050 feet.
Quote:
Buildings with a slenderness ratio of 1:10 or more demand additional steps to reduce acceleration, such as dampers installed near their crowns. At One57 and 432 Park these take the form of tuned mass dampers, which consist of weights (typically between 500 and 1,200 tons) suspended from springs. Some buildings, including 56 Leonard, rely on a tuned liquid damper. It has a compartmentalized pool filled with water. In both types, the mass moves more slowly than the building sways, dampening the acceleration.
Quote:
The setbacks at 111 57th “confuse” the wind, reducing pushing forces on the windward side and the suction forces on the leeward side. As the design is refined, the architect will probably include gaps in the facade to let wind pass through the building, lowering the overall force.
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Old February 13th, 2015, 08:48 AM   #1831
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They are still digging, at least 30 feet deep by now, as of Wednesday. It is going far faster as there are two excavators carefully working so as to not constantly bump into each other. They were not in use when I was there, hence the ability to actually take pictures without being interrupted.


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Old February 13th, 2015, 01:06 PM   #1832
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Great update!
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Old February 16th, 2015, 10:58 PM   #1833
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that pit is just tiny.
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Old February 17th, 2015, 01:17 AM   #1834
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The drapes of doom are also up on the brick building at the back of the lot. Can only be a good sign!
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Old February 17th, 2015, 04:03 AM   #1835
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric Offereins View Post
that pit is just tiny.
I know, crazy to think a building nearly as high as the Sears will sprout of of this thing!
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Old February 17th, 2015, 04:35 AM   #1836
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If only it were true. The building will actually sprout from that brick lowrise behind the pit.
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Old February 18th, 2015, 09:03 PM   #1837
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Satellite imagery from June.



One 57 on the left

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Old February 19th, 2015, 01:46 PM   #1838
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If only it were true. The building will actually sprout from that brick lowrise behind the pit.
still a good deal of demolition to do then?
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Old February 19th, 2015, 03:45 PM   #1839
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Quote:
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If only it were true. The building will actually sprout from that brick lowrise behind the pit.
If you look at this image you can see that a portion of the tower will indeed rise right out of the 43-foot-wide alley.

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Old February 21st, 2015, 09:27 AM   #1840
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That is going to take so long to build. =|
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