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Old October 19th, 2006, 07:51 AM   #101
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Mind the gap!
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Old October 19th, 2006, 08:25 AM   #102
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There's a few stations in Tokyo with decent sized gaps, mostly on curved sections where express trains also go past. They usually have some flashing lights under the platform and a recorded anouncement repeating over and over "Mind the Gap! Mind the Gap! Mind the Gap!"
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Old October 20th, 2006, 09:38 AM   #103
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Some of the railway operators (Tokyo Metro, Seoul Metro & New York Metro) already put a mechnical device to fill up the gap during alighting and broading.
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Old October 21st, 2006, 04:11 AM   #104
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15 inch gap? Wow....thats like an instant trap for a kid!
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Old December 19th, 2006, 08:47 AM   #105
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Update on New York's LIRR connection to Grand Central and Second Ave Line

The Federal Govt. has committed $2.3 billion to build a connection between the Long Island Rail Road and Grand Central Station. It also committed $693 million for the new Second Avenue line.

The LIRR project is already under construction; the Second Avenue line will begin next year. Both projects will be completed by 2013.

Here's the complete article from the New York Times:


Long Planned, Transit Projects Get U.S. Help
New York Times - December 19, 2006
By William Neuman

After decades of planning and dreaming by officials, two major expansions of the city’s mass transit system took important steps forward yesterday, with the federal government promising to pay billions of dollars for a Long Island Rail Road connection to Grand Central Terminal and for a Second Avenue subway.

Transportation Secretary Mary E. Peters said final approval had been granted to allow $2.6 billion in federal funds to be spent on construction of the Long Island Rail Road link, which will give commuters on the railroad a direct ride to the east side of Manhattan. Speaking at a news conference in the main hall of Grand Central, she said it was the most money the federal government had ever committed to a mass transit project.

She said her department had also approved $693 million for the new subway on Second Avenue. In both cases, the federal money is only a portion of the total costs.

Work in Queens on the Long Island Rail Road project has already begun, and the Second Avenue work is to begin next year. Both projects are to be finished in 2013, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority said.

The Long Island Rail Road project, known as East Side Access, will create a new spur from the railroad’s main line at Sunnyside that will terminate at Grand Central. In the future passengers will be able to choose between trains that go either to Grand Central or to Pennsylvania Station.

The project involves digging new tunnels in Manhattan and Queens that would connect to an existing rail tunnel under the East River, at 63rd Street. In Queens the tunnels would link up with the Long Island Rail Road tracks. Beneath Manhattan, the tunnels would head across town, turn south at Park Avenue and end about 150 feet below Grand Central, at a vast new underground concourse carved out of the rock.

Currently, the only Manhattan stop for the Long Island Rail Road is at Pennsylvania Station, on the West Side, though the railroad estimates that about half the 106,000 riders who arrive at Penn Station each morning are actually headed to the East Side. The new terminal would cut those riders’ daily commute by a total of about 40 minutes, officials said.

Officials say the East Side Access will also increase service and ease crowding on the Long Island Rail Road. By lowering the railroad’s use of tracks at Pennsylvania Station, it would reduce backups for other Long Island riders and also for Amtrak and New Jersey Transit commuters who use the station.

Planning for an East Side stop dates back at least to the mid-1960s. The 63rd Street tunnel under the East River was completed in the mid-1970s, but by then the city’s fiscal crisis had interrupted expansion plans. The double-decker tunnel has an upper set of tracks for subway trains — the F train currently uses them. A lower set of tracks in the tunnel were intended for the Long Island Rail Road but have never been used.

Plans for a subway line on Second Avenue go back even further. The transportation authority plans to build the subway in stages, with the first section running from 96th Street to 63rd Street, where it will connect with the existing tracks for the N, R and W lines.

Gaining federal funding of this magnitude is a lengthy process, often accompanied at incremental stages by announcements by eager public officials. But in the case of the Long Island rail project, yesterday’s event, at which Ms. Peters and Gov. George E. Pataki signed a ceremonial letter of agreement, was the final approval.

Known as a full funding grant agreement, it reflects a commitment by the federal government to pay a specific amount, in installments, over the life of the project.

In contrast, the Second Avenue subway project is said to be some months short of such a binding commitment. In saying that her department had approved $693 million for the subway, Ms. Peters meant that she would ask Congress to appropriate that amount as a kind of down payment, so that work can begin.

Ultimately, the federal government expects to invest a total of $1.3 billion in the subway project. James S. Simpson, the administrator of the Federal Transit Administration, said his agency was confident that final approval for the full amount would come through.

The Long Island rail connector has a total budget of $6.3 billion. A majority of the $3.7 billion not supplied by the federal government will be raised through the sale of bonds by the authority and the state.

The Second Avenue project has an estimated cost of $3.8 billion. There, too, most of the $2.5 billion not covered by federal funds will be raised through borrowing.

Yesterday’s event drew a gaggle of politicians and transportation officials.

Peter S. Kalikow, the chairman of the transportation authority, called it “an event that started in 1968,” a reference to the early days of planning for the Long Island Rail Road connection.
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Old December 19th, 2006, 09:04 AM   #106
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Fantastic news!

Good to see that the mugger that is Washington DC finally gives something to the city is bleeds like a sacred cash cow.

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Old February 14th, 2007, 05:23 AM   #107
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Federal panel to study standards for rail platform gap width
By MARK JEWELL
12 February 2007

BOSTON (AP) - Officials are studying whether to set federal safety standards for the width of gaps between commuter rail passenger platforms and train doorways.

A task force of the Federal Railroad Administration that reviews passenger safety will meet in Cambridge, Mass., on Tuesday and Wednesday to gather information and consider potential safety measures.

There is no specific proposal to require a maximum gap width, agency spokesman Warren Flatau said Monday.

The issue gained fresh attention after last summer's death of a Minnesota teen who fell through a gap at a commuter rail station in New York. The rail administration was reviewing the issue even before the death, Flatau said.

Any policy recommendations likely would affect the nation's 20 or so commuter rail systems, including Amtrak, Flatau said. Subway systems do not fall under the rail agency's jurisdiction.

Establishing and maintaining a gap standard is a complicated process because of variations among equipment types, track maintenance, track curvature and platform configuration, agency Administrator Joseph Boardman told a congressional panel two weeks ago.

The Americans with Disabilities Act calls for a gap of no more than 3 inches.

Depending on the equipment that a disabled person uses, gaps at different stations may or may not be surmountable, said Jennifer Dexter, assistant vice president for government relations of Easter Seals Inc., a nonprofit provider of services for the disabled.

"There isn't a cut-and-dry answer on how big a gap is too big," she said.

Among those expected to participate at the meeting are representatives of the rail industry and public transit agencies, including the Long Island Rail Road.

An LIRR rail station is where 18-year-old Natalie Smead of Northfield, Minn., died in August. She fell through the gap and was trying to climb onto the platform on the other side when she was struck by another train.
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Old April 20th, 2008, 09:22 PM   #108
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Subway Line To Meadowlands (NY/NJ)

Does anybody have an update on the construction in the NY/NJ area in the US regarding the new line that will service the Meadowlands and new shopping center (Xanadu)/Stadium?
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Old April 20th, 2008, 09:38 PM   #109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soxrok3 View Post
Does anybody have an update on the construction in the NY/NJ area in the US regarding the new line that will service the Meadowlands and new shopping center (Xanadu)/Stadium?
I suspect, sadly, this line is just a pipe dream.
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Old April 26th, 2008, 10:11 AM   #110
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i believe you're wrong. says the stadium website and drawings, there will, in fact be a train station DIRECTLY next to the stadium. if you check the website, you can see it for yourself. If anybody has updates, please do let me know or post some photos of the construction progress. I have seen first hand some of the progress they've been making on the stadium and new roadways into the Meadowlands complex and I'm sure they're making similar progress on the new track into the complex.
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Old June 12th, 2008, 07:21 PM   #111
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LIRR says platform gap fixes will total $46 million
25 April 2008

NEW YORK (AP) - The Long Island Rail Road expects tightening gaps between trains and platforms will ultimately cost $46 million.

The figure emerged Thursday as the commuter railroad detailed plans to install metal plates extending beneath train car doors. The plates are among a variety of steps taken since since a teenager died after falling through a gap on an LIRR platform in 2006.

The railroad has realigned tracks, added platform conductors and installed wooden boards on platforms to narrow the gaps. The LIRR also has stopped opening doors at parts of some stations where the spaces are biggest.

There have been more than 800 gap-related accidents on the LIRR since 1995.
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Old June 12th, 2008, 09:42 PM   #112
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Federal panel to study standards for rail platform gap width
For this 'to become' a federal matter, wouldn't you think many Stateside commuter operators oughtta first be darn well elevating their short platforms?


Last edited by trainrover; June 12th, 2008 at 10:44 PM.
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Old March 16th, 2012, 11:00 PM   #113
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NEW YORK CITY | Commuter Rail


The Bronx
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Old March 17th, 2012, 06:00 AM   #114
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Its not NYC Commuter rail , but NY , NJ , CT commuter rail
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Old March 17th, 2012, 05:50 PM   #115
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That's a queer distinction you're attempting, considering that the riverside track to the filmed island platform is defined as being reserved for Manhattan-bound services originating from the neighbouring borough Bronx ...
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Old March 17th, 2012, 10:54 PM   #116
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I like the idea of this thread. IMO commuter rail fits better here than in the "Railways" subforum separated by only country and not locale/metro area.
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Old March 17th, 2012, 11:56 PM   #117
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It hadn't dawned on me that some NJ Transit train filmed at Stamford, CT, must've been being leased ... I got to musing whether the constitution of greater NY's commuter rail network might not be radial after all

Was this the only city to ever have a nap car ledgered in a commuter-fleet roster

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Old March 18th, 2012, 12:59 AM   #118
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trainrover View Post
That's a queer distinction you're attempting, considering that the riverside track to the filmed island platform is defined as being reserved for Manhattan-bound services originating from the neighbouring borough Bronx ...
Which Manhattan-bound services originate in the Bronx other than NYC subway lines and gameday NYY shuttles?
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Old March 18th, 2012, 03:13 AM   #119
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Professor L Gee View Post
I like the idea of this thread. IMO commuter rail fits better here than in the "Railways" subforum separated by only country and not locale/metro area.
Nah, I dont think so. These services share tracks with freight trains.
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Old March 18th, 2012, 05:55 AM   #120
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Quote:
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Nah, I dont think so. These services share tracks with freight trains.
I guess I'm focusing more on the services than the tracks they use. IMO Metro-North, Metra, MARC, et al. deserve coverage separate from Amtrak and CSX.
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