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Old May 31st, 2014, 07:10 PM   #921
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San Francesco Grande, another big gothic church of Pavia:





the interiors reminded us somewhat of the Chiaravalle abbey:











half of the church have gothic vaults:







Side chapels:



















the gothic part:







The left transept is a most wonderful baroque chapel:















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Old May 31st, 2014, 11:08 PM   #922
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommolo View Post

The Ark of Saint Augustin, an absolute masterpiece!

Details of the interior vault of the ark!

breathtaking...awe inspiring...you name it, it's so freakin' gorgeous! I wanted to scream "bravo!" when I saw it for the first time!
Yes.
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“The meaning of earthly existence lies not, as we have grown used to thinking, in prospering but in the development of the soul.”
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"We are more closely connected to the invisible than to the visible"

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Old June 1st, 2014, 05:09 AM   #923
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Amazing You really have to look at your (my) city through photos to get impressed, LOL.
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Old June 3rd, 2014, 11:03 PM   #924
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Wow... Pavia!!!!
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Old June 6th, 2014, 04:15 AM   #925
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Yes Pavia is a city full of art! I would advice a visit to Milan AND Pavia to have a complete visit!

Certosa di Garegnano charterhouse, with frescoes from Daniele Crespi and Simone Peterzano, who had a great student like the Caravaggio:





the vault:



the dome:



The famous crucifixion by Simone Peterzano, a masterpiece!



Artistically, the most important piece of art of this charter house:



Another one of the dome:



the counter facade:



the sides of the nave becomes pictorical spaces:





Details of the frescoes by Daniele Crespi:



Frescoed baptistry:



Dal Pozzo like vault:





Details of the frescoes of the vault:







A side chapel:





Monks of the charterhouse painted between the vault frescoes and the windows. So cute!





Details:





All pictures are mine.
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Old June 13th, 2014, 04:04 PM   #926
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San Lorenzo in Monluè little ancient church, built in 1267 between romanesque and simple rural gothic style. It is in the eastern part of the city, in a rural park.

the campanile, or bell tower, reminds a magician's hat:















the apsis:





All pictures are mine.
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Old June 13th, 2014, 04:24 PM   #927
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The Santi Nereo e Achilleo basilica, built in Art Deco style between 1937 and 1940 by architect Giovanni Maria Maggi, is one of the biggest "modern" basilicas in Milan: it's 65 meters long and 28 meters wide (18 the main nave and 4 meters each side nave).

the huge exterior in a Stefano Gusmeroli picture:



It shows on the inside interesting modern art frescoes by Vanni Rossi on the apsis:



Detail:





the couterfacade has really amazing modern stained glass windows, sorry it they aren't so visible:



Anyway, the main attraction of the church is the side chapel of the Madonna di Fatima, the masterpiece of the artist Vanni Rossi. Really amazing frescoes from 1948. The modern art at its best.



















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Old June 16th, 2014, 03:34 PM   #928
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Some pictures from Sant'Ambrogio basilica:









the pulpit and the sarcophagus of Stilicho, roman era sculptures of IV century, with christian basrelieves. The pulprit is from IX century.





Romanesque pulprit:





Jesus teaching:



on the tympanum above the basrelief, one of the first nativity scenes ever, with the donkey and the ox...

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Old June 16th, 2014, 03:55 PM   #929
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San Lorenzo Maggiore basilica, some side chapel:

Chapel of San Sisto, on the vault nice frescoes from 1600s:







Cittadini chapel:

A drizzle of romanesque:



A little bit of gothic:



...and top it with a byzantine frescoes cherry!



Chapel of Sant'Aquilino, the most ancient and important part of the basilica, IV century:

Roman palace carved gate, I century maybe:



frescoes:



Looks like Ravenna or Istanbul:





IV century Mosaics:







the apse, decorated more than 1000 years later:





Grotesque frescoes on the cleristory gallery:



More IV century mosaics:






From Daniela Brocca's Panoramio profile, the Traditio legis, the most beautiful mosaics here:



Details of the most beautiful IV century mosaics from Wikimedia Commons contributor Jakub Hałun:



Other byzantine frescoes:



the massive dome:

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Old June 19th, 2014, 03:36 AM   #930
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Santuario dell'Addolorata in Rho, a borough 15 km west of Milan duomo cathedral. You can easily reach Rho from Garibaldi Railway station with overground lines S5 and S6 in some 15 minutes.
This huge sanctuary and basilica was started in 1588 after a Miracle happened in 1583: a small painting showing the Madonna started crying blood. That's why is called the Addolorata, the Grieving Lady. It is nowadays one of the big sites of marian pilgrimage in Lombardy.
The original project of 1588 is from Pellegrino Tibaldi.

The huge neoclassical facade designed by Leopold Pollack, the Austrian Monarchy official architect:







The high dome is 54 meters tall and the high bell tower is 75 meters tall:



The huge interiors: the church is 74 meters long and 43 meters wide at the transept, making it one of the largest in Lombardy.































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Old June 19th, 2014, 08:09 AM   #931
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommolo View Post
Jesus teaching:



on the tympanum above the basrelief, one of the first nativity scenes ever, with the donkey and the ox...

These are some of the most beautiful bas relief I have ever seen - and I think the earliest nativity scene I have seen of any kind.

They have survived from the 4th century...Do you know what they are made of?
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“In keeping silent about evil, in burying it so deep within us that no sign of it appears on the surface, we are implanting it, and it will rise up a thousand fold in the future. When we neither punish nor reproach evildoers we are thereby ripping the foundations of justice from beneath new generations.”

“The meaning of earthly existence lies not, as we have grown used to thinking, in prospering but in the development of the soul.”
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

"We are more closely connected to the invisible than to the visible"

-Novalis

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Old June 19th, 2014, 11:39 AM   #932
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...here you are a detail of the scene above, carved into marble, the favourite material for roman era carvings.
If you want more information about this piece, it is called "sarcophagus of Stilicho" (Sarcofago di Stilicone):





It is mentioned in this Wikipedia article (second image):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_Christian_sarcophagi

and in this article too:

http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...icho/home.html

...and here you'll find some pro pictures, of course much better that the ones I've published!

http://www.rome101.com/Topics/Christ...609_0702WS.htm
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Old June 20th, 2014, 11:59 PM   #933
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San Vittore basilica, Mannerist style, years 1500s.



Side naves:



Details of the "lacunarii", the decoration of the vault:







the apsis:









The transept:







The wooden carved choir:



the choir:







All pictures are mine.
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Old June 23rd, 2014, 12:38 AM   #934
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Since many of you loved Pavia's pictures, here you are the achitectonical jewel of that city. It's the chartehouse of Pavia, built as an ex voto by Gian Galeazzo Visconti, Lord of Milan. Works started in 1396 and the church was completed in 1497. The gorgeous facade wasn't completed until 1507 though. The architect was Guiniforte Solari (author of Santa Maria alle Grazie's gothic nave) and then Giovanni Antonio Amadeo (Pavia has some others monuments from him).
It is located 22 kms south of the Duomo cathedral of Milan and some 8 kms from Pavia. It's easy to reach it with the overground line S13 from Garibaldi railway station, stop named Certosa di Pavia, properly enough .
The Certosa di Pavia, part one, the exteriors:











The terracotta carvings on the arches...so Lombard...











the main cloister:






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Old June 23rd, 2014, 12:45 AM   #935
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The certosa di Pavia part two: the astounding, world renaissance masterpiece of the carved facade:





Incredible facade:









The main portal:





















Detail!







:-o
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Old June 23rd, 2014, 12:51 AM   #936
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Certosa di Pavia part 3: the main nave.





























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Old June 23rd, 2014, 12:58 AM   #937
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A gate brings us to the transept and the choir, reserved to the monks:



The transept is taller and very long:







The absidal part:















A portal divides the apsidal part from the transept, as you can see here:





...and this is the gate dividing the trasept from the main nave:



the huge dome:



Again the trasept:





The plan of the structure, here you'll see the three parts that forms the big church, the main nave, then the transept and then again the apsis:

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Old June 23rd, 2014, 12:22 PM   #938
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The Certosa of Pavia is somehow a sort of Lombardy's Taj Majal, not just because of the intricate carvings of the decorations, or the gorgeous structure, but also because of the history that made Gian Galeazzo Visconti build it, an history of death and love. His wife, Caterina Visconti, had a disastrous first childbearing in 1385: the baby died and she almost did.
In 1390, his wife was childbearing again, and Gian Galeazzo Visconti made and ex voto: if Caterina would have survived this, then he will build a charter house, the biggest, the most monumental of them all. Despite the loss of the second baby too, Caterina luckily survived, and Gian Galeazzo decided to build the charter house.

This is the monumental tomb of Gian Galeazzo Visconti, sculptured between 1494 and 1497 by Giovanni Cristoforo Romano and Benedetto Briosco:



And this is a masterpiece, the tomb of Ludovico il Moro and Beatrice d'Este, by Cristoforo Solari. Wow!



These two pictures are from wikimedia commons
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Old June 24th, 2014, 10:04 PM   #939
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommolo View Post
...here you are a detail of the scene above, carved into marble, the favourite material for roman era carvings.
If you want more information about this piece, it is called "sarcophagus of Stilicho" (Sarcofago di Stilicone):
Thanks. Very helpful.
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“In keeping silent about evil, in burying it so deep within us that no sign of it appears on the surface, we are implanting it, and it will rise up a thousand fold in the future. When we neither punish nor reproach evildoers we are thereby ripping the foundations of justice from beneath new generations.”

“The meaning of earthly existence lies not, as we have grown used to thinking, in prospering but in the development of the soul.”
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

"We are more closely connected to the invisible than to the visible"

-Novalis

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Old June 26th, 2014, 09:04 PM   #940
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San Fedele Basilica in Milan, built by Saint Charles Borromeo as a Reformation church manifesto. It has a very luminous interiors, it deals with the light as a sort of palladian architecture I would say. It has been designed in 1569 by Pellegrino Tibaldi.











The tall dome:







The most beautiful ebanon confessional:











Side chapels:



Deposition by Simone Peterzano, 1591. Very interesting the similarity/differences with the more famous deposition painting by Peterzano's pupil: Caravaggio, now in the Vatican Museums in Rome.



To help you with the comparation, here you are the one from Caravaggio, year 1602 or 1604 at latest, ten years after the one from Peterzano in San Fedele.



(this one's from Wikicommons)

This is the other great piece of art of the basilica, a very heart moving scupture just below Peterzano's painting.





And a basrelief:



Cerano's vision of St. Ignatius:



"Madonna della Scala" frescoes, XIV century.



...and this one is from XX century: Lucio Fontana! "The redemptor", year 1956.


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