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Old November 10th, 2014, 02:26 AM   #981
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Thank you! Yes, the carvings are really exquisite! It's well worth a visit!

Santissimo Redentore neoromanesque church, started in 1898 and finished in year 1900.





The beautiful apsis:



Images found in Wikipedia, pictures shot by Pufui Pc Pifpef I

And this is Santa Maria Assunta, another revivalist church. The exteriors are quite sober, with the use of the classical lombard red brick:



But the interior is nice and elegant. There is also a reproduction of the amazing Assunta by Tiziano of the Frari basilica in the apsis, one of my favourite paintings of all times!



Images are from wikipedia, pictures shot by Friederichstrasse
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Old November 14th, 2014, 02:33 AM   #982
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We return to Caravaggio, a town 35 kms east of the Duomo of Milan that we've already visited in the previous page thanks to its magnificent Sanctuary. Today I want to talk to you about a most important building that needs restorations to save its precious fresco, literally an heritage of the whole world that needs to be restored. This, my friends, is San Bernardino in Caravaggio.



Built between 1472 and 1488, this church presents a most interesting interior, for its renaissance frescoes. Let's see them!

















This splendid church with renaissance frescoes by Fermo Stella needs restorations to help prevent the rain to ruin these frescoes. Thanks to the Italian National Trust, called Fondo Ambientale Italiano or FAI, they're collecting signatures to invert a substantial amount of money in order to restore and put on safe the frescoes and the roof. You too can sign to help this cause, you too can save ancient art in the World. It's not difficult, just sign HERE and click on the "VOTA" button. The whole world will be grateful with you! Thank you!
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Old November 16th, 2014, 11:40 PM   #983
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Today I went to see the Santa Maria in Calvenzano basilica, one of the five Abbeys (or former abbey) in the southern Milan, a very rich abbatial heritage. The Santa Maria in Calvenzano comes directly from Cluny. This is the third church built in the same place, one above the other. The first one has been built in the V century, it's a most ancient structure, I tell you! The second is from the X century and the last church is the one we see today and has been built by abbotts from Cluny in the XI century. Is a most delightful romanesque church, so true and so pure in its simple and elegant lines. Very emotional, I have to admit!

The Santa Maria in Calvenzano abbey is located in Vizzolo Predabissi, near Melegnano, some 15 kms southeast of the Duomo cathedral, that is the city centre of Milan.

The exterior, typical Lombard romanesque:



Let's start notice the most precious XII century romanesque carvings on the portal, the most important piece of art of the basilica:



Let's see in detail. As you can see the portal tells about the Childhood of Jesus, starting from right to left, since left is the evil in Medieval simbology.

Here we see the annunciation to Mary:



In the second scene, you have the hug between Mary and Elizabeth, in the third scene, the annunciation of the Angel to Saint Joseph while sleeping (Joseph is super cute here, huh?), in the fourth scene you have the Birth of Jesus



in the fifth the annunciation to the shepherds (see the shepherd shouting out on the top of a hill? ahaha! this is all so clearly described!)



The sixth scene is all about the adoration of the Magi, then you have the Palace of Herodes and the Flee to Egypt:



The ninth scene is Herodes assisting unimpressed to the death of a child having his head cut off. The tenth and last scene is Herodes having a bath trying to mitigate the pains of the Divine punishment.



As you see, thread of vines comes out of the mouth of the Man. The man is on the right, since is supposed to be good..well...



...and on the left we have a dragon, symbol of the evil, who eats off the vines threads.



A last detail of the Annunciation to the shepherds, I found this scene gorgeously carved!



All images are mine.
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Old November 17th, 2014, 12:05 AM   #984
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Santa Maria in Calvenzano Part II:

Ready for some roman era archeology? Let's go!

The side reminds us a previous structure, these arches are structural, but how much of this comes from the fifth century? I guess more than you may presume, but that's just my two cents! San Simpliciano, for example, in Milan too, is from the fith century and have very similar side arches in its paleochristian structure, same said for the Basilica of constantine of Trier in Germany...we'll see, we'll see...



The light of the dawn:



the AMAZING apse, so truthfully romanesque!





Ok, for this we have the demonstration that is from the fifth century and so from Late Roman era: this part here has the most typical "opus spicatum", a classical way of building for the romans!



To better understand what the "opus spicatum" is, I show you this image from the Trajan Market (100 a.D.) in Rome. See? Bricks puts in diagonal in a row and on the opposite diagonal on the lower row and so on: this is Opus Spicatum!



(image taken from Wikicommons)

Opus spicatum everywhere!



As you can see, also on the sides (the part of the arches I said before) there is roman era Opus Spicatum, a sign that the whole side and the arches too may be really roman era buildings!



Apsis again, so beautiful!





Here you see that the Opus Spicatum reach a certain height on the side of the building...



It is amazingly intact huh? 1600 years old!





The facade too has some structure that needs further studies:







End of part two! Ready to enter? We'll do it on part III!

All pictures are mine.
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Old November 17th, 2014, 12:16 AM   #985
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Santa Maria in Calvenzano part III:

The interiors!



On the apsis, a fresco representing the Coronation of Mary dating back to the second half of 1300, almost 700 years old now! Wow!



Picture in detail of the fresco found on www.stradadelleabbazie.it













Side nave:







Opus Spicatum also on the inside:





Side apsis, so sweet and beautiful!







A faceless gothic Madonna. very very ancient! I guess some 6-700 years old at least!









Statues:













And that's all! I hope you enjoyed the ride in this small but very beautiful jewel of Southern Milan!

All pictures are mine.
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Old November 17th, 2014, 01:06 PM   #986
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tommolo, how many Romanesque churches are in Milán? and in the metropolitan area? It is one of the cities with the most Romanesque churches in Europe with Cologne, Zamora....
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Old November 17th, 2014, 01:51 PM   #987
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Yes, of course! We have to focus that Lombardy region, and the Po Valley in general, has been a strong propulsory centre of the romanesque aesthetics, we're just after year 1000, the End of the World did non happened, so we have a strong flourishing of religious orders all over Europe that went to the swamplands and started a cultivation. The Po Valley was Europe's biggest swampland, so it was the ideal "laboratory" to the "ora et labora" (work and pray) religious orders. Milan was the capital of that region and so in Lombardy we assist to the birth of what it is called "first romanesque", or -properly enough- "lombard romanesque". We see traces of this style also in Catalonia, in the Boi valley (Unesco site), where lombard masters operated at the start of the millennium. The manifesto of the First Romanesque is Sant'Ambrogio basilica, where we see for the first time in art history structural crossed vault in order to widen the main nave. This feature will be developed on and on in later romanesque and in gothic architecture.

So, back to your questions (I would add also Segovia, has many many romanesque churches, and of course Rome, Florence and Naples have a massive amount of romanesque churches too) I count 21 romanesque religious structures only considering the proper municipality of Milan, excluding many early gothic building (san cristoforo al naviglio for instance) and paleochristian structures that are well preserved, like San Lorenzo maggiore basilica. Of these 21 structures, 7 are major basilicas, 6 are notable churches and 5 are small chapels, the rest being single standing romanesque structure.

- Sant'Ambrogio basilica (IV century, partially paleochristian)
- San Nazaro basilica (IV century, partially paleochristian)
- Sant'Eustorgio (IV century, partially paleochristian)
- San Simpliciano (IV century, partially paleochristian)
- San Babila (V century, partially neoromanesque now)
- San Calimero (V century, almost totally neoromanesque now)
- San Vincenzo in prato (the only paleochristian facade survived in Milan, X century)

Minor romanesque:

- Santi Re Magi
- San Bernardino alle Monache (transition with gothic style)
- San Giovanni in Conca (only the crypt, very beautiful though!)
- Santa Maria la rossa in Crescenzago
- San Lorenzo in Monluè (transition with gothic style)
- San Celso next to Santa Maria dei Miracoli basilica
- An interesting romanesque campanile (bell tower) in Baggio district
- Another bell tower in Santa Maria presso San Satiro
- San Faustino all'Ortica

Romanesque little chapels still standing:

-Chapel of Nosedo
-Chapel of San Protaso al Lorenteggio
- Sant'Antonino in Segnano
- San Pietro ai pellegrini
- San Sigismondo little chapel next to Sant'Ambrogio basilica
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Old November 17th, 2014, 02:21 PM   #988
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Palermo is also impresive how many norman romanesque having, even more than Naples, which has norman structures (castles, any church) but mainly gothic (angevin, catalan)
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Old November 19th, 2014, 08:27 PM   #989
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Great, as usual, Tommolo! I love the Santuario di Caravaggio. Certainly a unique layout!
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Old November 26th, 2014, 08:55 PM   #990
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San Marco Basilica:



The very long nave: after the Duomo cathedral, this is the longest nave in the city, although not the longest church building (that would be Sant'Eustorgio, with all its chapels attached after the main nave)



The frescoed apsis:







A (most beautiful) side chapel, the Cappella Foppa, with frescoes by Lomazzo!



the apsis of the side chapel!! It seems the frescoed apsis of a beautiful church!



the main nave seen from a side chapel:



Another side chapel:







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Old November 26th, 2014, 09:25 PM   #991
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Church of San Cristoforo al Naviglio, this is a gothic twin medieval church:





















After all the gothic frescoes, an early Renaissance one:



The main facade, you can see the twin churches:

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Old November 26th, 2014, 09:41 PM   #992
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Ok this is not a church building, but it is the most important Renaissance civil building in Milan, this is the Ca' Granda hospital, the architect is the Filarete. I assure you that we'll see the chapel of the building ok? So that we still are in topic!

The main cloister:





The "crocera", or the intersection of the four halls making a cross to hospitalize the sicks.







It is the most spectacular part to me.

Renaissance statues. Today is used as a library.



the dome at the crossing:







The "ghiacciaia", to keep the ice.



Minor cloisters:



Damages of the WWII, they decided not to restore it. A warning against all wars.



















The external portico:



Details of the exterior "baroque"/gothic windows, in terra cotta.



And here you are the chapel of the complex, built in baroque style, it has a painting from the Guercino, very very beautiful:

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Old November 27th, 2014, 11:36 AM   #993
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the influence of the architecture of Filarete in hospitals in Europe was immense.
Medieval hospitals were exceeded. More functional hospitals, with a Latin cross and courtyards that provided light and ventilation are built. In Spain specifically Filarete model was copied in hospitals that were built between the late fifteenth and the sixteenth century (Royal Hospital of Santiago de Compostela, Granada Royal Hospital, hospital of Santa Cruz de Toledo, hospital of the Cinco LLagas in Sevilla)
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Old November 27th, 2014, 07:36 PM   #994
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thank you for your contribution, I didn't know the hospital you named, but yes, Filarete was a genious and a social activist ante litteram that was worried about the conditions of sick and poor of the time. Filarete was a nickname, meaning "he who loves knowledge" in greek, and he was very fond of all the ancient, "pre-humanistic" classical thought, that was rediscovered in the early Renaissance in Europe. Francesco Sforza wanted the hospital, we shall remember that in middle ages hospital were few and overall there were no purposely dedicated structures to public health, since the noblemen were assisted in their palaces in italy or in their castles in the rest of europe, and poor people...well...they usually tried to recover somewhat in their own houses.
The invention of the hospital as a place with the correct space, air and light to each one of the patient is really revolutionary. Each patient, whatever was its conditions and social status, received a bed, with his own window, his own closet and so on, the beds were spaced, as we can appreciate from the images published upwards, and each one of the four naves has two rows, one per side, and in the middle of the nave there was a huge corridor, in order to have the situation well under control. We are at the very beginning of the renaissance, the Ca' Granda (the original part) was built by Filarete between 1457 and 1465!

Plan of the Filarete's Ca' Granda hospital, original drawing of the architect:



And here is how it is now, some 560 years later!



It is worth to mention that the Ca' Granda was a part of a bigger plan, the creation of an ideal city, an architectural utopia (one of the many in the Renaissance) that was supposed to create a huge capital city for the Sforza dinasty, according the project of the Filarete. As we can see, the plan of the Ca' Granda was present at the very centre of this utopistical city called Sforzinda:



By the way, Filarete's project of a "star-shaped city" is very similar to another Renaissance utopistical city, this time actually built, the famous Palmanova:



The ideas of a circular city influenced also another great engineer in Milan, the great Leonardo da Vinci, who worked on a city with drains and different levels, surrounded by Navigli channels:



In this drawin from leonardo, we see the utopistical division of the building in two different level. The architecture is clearly inspired by Filarete.



The machines that the engineer Leonardo created was very useful to achieve the creation of the artificial channels that we still see today in Milan.







We can appreciate these projects in the Codex Atlanticus, in exposition in the Santa Maria delle Grazie basilica and in the Pinacoteca Ambrosiana, both in Milan.
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Old November 27th, 2014, 11:17 PM   #995
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...and talking about the Ca' Granda, the hospital had huge donations and they become very rich landowners with the years. For instance, one of the five abbeys we can find in the southern, rural part of Milan was property of the Ca' Granda: the XIV century abbey of Mirasole. This abbey is 8,5 kms south of the Duomo cathedral of Milan, it is built in a late gothic style, it's a very simple church, structurally, but it is so charming and sweet!
it has a nice mannerist chapel and a stunning late gothic frescoed apsis.
Let's discover it!



We're in the Parco Agricolo Sud Milano, the risotto you eat everywhere in the world is made with rice cultivated (also) in this area. A very rural and agricoltural park that is also an historical landmark some 8,5 kms south of the very city center...wow!

The tower of the abbey complex is also the main entrance:



Chapels along the way:



This one is in a simple baroque style:



The full medieval complex:



The main church building, from the early XIV century:



Approaching the abbey:



And we're in!









The lamb, symbol of the Humiliati, the religious order that owned the abbey until XVI century, and then became property of the Ca' Granda.

The complex on the inside:



As you can see, on the bell tower, at the top, there is a smiling sun! Symbol of the Abbey, whose name in italian would be something like..."look at the sun"...even if it was actually a foggy day!



Another image of the bell tower, very beautiful and harmonical to me!



All pictures are mine.

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Old November 27th, 2014, 11:28 PM   #996
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Mirasole abbey part II, let's go inside!



A very beautiful chapel on the right, a mannerist chapel from the XVI century:



...with a really beautiful painting:



Detail of the beautiful painting:



The apsis is in gothic style and have some stunnig late gothic/early renaissance frescoes by the painter Bonifacio Bembo:









The very simple yet somewhat whimsical counterfacade:



Details of the side chapel:





the beautiful side chapel altar:















All pictures are mine.
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Old November 27th, 2014, 11:39 PM   #997
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Abbey of Mirasole part III, rural attached buildings.

Agricultural portico:





complete sight of the abbadial complex from the portico:



the palace of the prior, the chief of the Abbey:



The beautiful baroque portal with a little balcony above it:



The sight from inside of the baroque portal of the palace of the prior:



the opposite side with the church building and the tower indicating the main entrance to the abbadial complex:





rural portico:



To conclude, it is worth mentioning that the Abbey has been chosen to be the place where will be opened the Ospedale Maggiore Ca' Granda Art Museum, that is the collection of painting, sculptures (the oldest ones are from XV century!) property of the historical institution of the Ca' Granda. In total, there are more than 1900 pieces of art in the collection. There are also many portraits, more than 900, that are mainly of the many benefactors that through the six (!!!) centuries of history of the institution provided with their money and their donations a future for the Ca' Granda. Some name of the painters that will be exposed? Well, let's start with one that is supposed to be school of Tiziano or Paris Bordon, Palma il Giovane, Defendente Ferrari, the Moretto, Ippolito Scarselli, Cesare Procaccini, Fede Galizia, the Nuvolone and for the late XVIII century Andrea Appiani. Excellent are the painters of the XIX century part of the collection: Hayez, Induno, Inganni, Gaetano Previati, Tranquillo Cremona, Giovanni Segantini (!!!), Mosè Bianchi, Emilio Gola. For the XX century there is Filippo Carcano, Achille Funi, Mario Sironi, Aldo Carpi and Piero Marussig.

All pictures are mine.

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Old November 29th, 2014, 07:23 PM   #998
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The cloisters of the Sant'Antonio Abate church:



The cloisters is supposed to be from the early 1500s...the renaissance terracottas looks absolutely gorgeous!



Look at the detail of the terracotta carvings:









The bell tower you see is the one of the Sant'Antonio church, a beautiful renaissance bell tower from XV century, very elegant with his typical italianate "conical" hat!





...scroll the image in order to see the magic of the renaissance perfect symmetry!









All pictures are mine.
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Old November 29th, 2014, 07:31 PM   #999
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And whose church are these cloisters? Of Sant'Antonio Abate, we said earlier.
You say you want to see the inside of the church? Ok, here we are!





The stories of the cross painted on the vault are simply unique! Pure art!



How can they be so overlooked by tourism? I don't get it, they deserve more!

All pictures are mine.
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Old November 29th, 2014, 07:41 PM   #1000
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...and to celebrate the post number 1000 (!!!wow!!!), here you are one of the grandest churches in the World, Milan's cathedral: her majesty the queen, the Duomo!



my picture from my personal instagram profile Tommolo84
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