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Old November 30th, 2014, 05:02 PM   #1001
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I've read and publish this article in this website: http://urbanfilemilano.blogspot.it/

I share the interesting picture about this very small church from the year 1482. Its name gives the name to the whole district: it is called San Siro alla Vepra. Yes, it gives the name to the famous stadium too, very close to this ancient little church. Unluckily, this building was linked to the nazi crimes during the WWII (they used it in 1944 to torture prisoners), and so it is considered to be somewhat a "gloomy building". It is called also "villa triste", or "sad villa", as they used to nickname these buildings in that unlucky era. But get back to Art! Now it is a religious institure ruled by nuns, and so it is often closed. Too bad, because the interior shows some really interesting pieces of art and frescoes!

As you see, the church has no facade, being attached to a civil building.



The beautiful apsis:



The interior frescoes:







The sacred Almond, a very popular iconic theme back in the middle ages, even if we're in the Renaissance when this church was built:



complete view of the apsis:









main apsis, the central one:







The neoromanesque building that ingobates the ancient church:



Side entrance:



As I mentioned before, all images comes from www.urbanfilemilano.blogspot.it
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Old December 6th, 2014, 09:37 PM   #1002
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Santa Maria della Consolazione al Castello, built between XV and XVI century in a simple and elegant renaissance style:





The vault is decorated with some interesting painting from the Renaissance/early baroque and its painter is Camillo Procaccini.



The main altar, with a painting from the XV century, and it is from the Lombard Renaissance School:





All these pictures are mine.

Now, pictures taken from the internet.

The facade (XIX century):



From Panoramio user Eziozerziani

The beautiful painting of Enea Salmeggia, called the Talpino (in english that would sound "little mole"... ), on a side chapel, "The Martyrdom of St. Andrew".



Detail of the altar:


Last edited by tommolo; December 6th, 2014 at 09:47 PM.
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Old December 7th, 2014, 02:04 AM   #1003
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Viboldone gothic abbey, in San Giuliano Milanese, 11.5 kilometers south of the Duomo cathedral of Milan, it's one of the 7 abbeys in the southern area of the city.



























From the Facebook page of Chiara Cammarano, published on the very interesting facebook page called Amatori dell'arte romanica e gotica della Lombardia (lovers of the gothic and romanesque heritage in Lombardy)
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Old December 7th, 2014, 02:14 AM   #1004
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Viboldone gothic abbey part II:

















































The facade:





The beautiful portal:





Pictures by Luca Borgia, taken from the facebook page of Amatori dell'arte romanica e gotica in Lombardia (lovers of the gothic and romanesque heritage in Lombardy)
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Old December 7th, 2014, 11:54 PM   #1005
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Can you see this building?



This is the Palazzo della Veneranda Fabbrica del Duomo, that is the Organization for the Building of the Cathedral. We're right behind the apsis of the Duomo cathedral, just across the street. Well, this building from the XIX century, a relatively new building for the standards of antiquity of the city of Milan, hidden a baroque little gem: a little chapel from the first quarter of the 1700s, Santa Maria Assunta in Camposanto (Camposanto is cemetery, since behind the cathedral there was a cemetery).

Let's see the pictures, the little church is now inside the ecleptic palace, so it has no facade. Here you are the interiors!



As you can see, it is a central plan building, it has no nave, no transept, it is just a round, domed hall and an elliptic, domed apsis.



Pellegrino Tibaldi's Mannerist Annunciation basrelief, originally destined to the duomo:



The elliptic apsis and the little dome above the altar:



The counterfacade:





Side altar:





Detail of the beautiful basrelief:



The dome of the apsis, above the main altar:







Detail of the fresco of the apsis as seen from a see-through windows on the main hall:





All pictures are mine.
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Old December 8th, 2014, 12:21 AM   #1006
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...and since today is Saint Ambrose, the Saint patron of Milan, here you are today's picture of the visit to the Saint's crypt above Sant'Ambrogio Basilica:



As you may have guessed, the carved urn is not ancient, it has been made in 1897 after the rediscovering of the bodies of Saint Ambrose, Saint Gervasius and Saint Protasius above the basilica in XIX century. The actual ecleptic urn is very beautiful though and is a work of silver art by Giovanni Lomazzi and designed by Ippolito Marchetti.



Saint Ambrose himself:



Around the crypt, lots and lots of roman era tombs!





This tomb is made with a red marble called porphyry, and it is the roman imperial celebrative stone, this is a sign that an high charge of the empire was buried here. When the opened the tomb, they understood who there was: nothing less than Saint Ambrose, Saint Gervasius and Protasius!



Many many other tombs:



This is heart-moving: a small tomb, it was a child from roman era. So sad.







People awe-inspired by the Saint's urn.



The basilica as seen from the crypt:



We already saw this, the first known nativity scene ever, on the Stilicone's Tomb, in the basilica of Sant'Ambrogio, dating back to the roman era:



Some piece of art inside the Basilica:



Excellent Renaissance painting by Bernardino Luini, one of the great author of the Renaissance!



The magnificent, magnificent romanesque interior:



Today the basilica was suuper crowded!



An unusual view of the Basilica, from the oratory of Sant'Ambrogio!





The cloisters of the oratory were interesting too!







The former clergy house of Sant'Ambrogio:



You can see the very delicate decorations:





Merry Saint Ambrose day!
All pictures are mine.
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Last edited by tommolo; December 10th, 2014 at 03:21 PM.
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Old December 11th, 2014, 09:09 PM   #1007
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This is the cathedral of Vigevano, a city near Abbiategrasso located some 30 kms southwest of the Milan Duomo cathedral.
It has been dedicated in 1612, even if the beautiful frescoes you see are all from XIX century, even if they're painted in a neo-baroque style. Here you can see the very strange and atypical concave facade, designed so to arrange the lack of symmetry in the plaza, that is trapezoidal instead of being rectangular. A very interesting and innovative solution!



Picture from wikipedia commons.

Here's my pictures from today's trip to Vigevano:

























Renaissance painting from 1530s, by a painter of leonardesque style, I'd say.









The seat of the Bishop:





The dome:



All pictures are mine.

Last edited by tommolo; December 12th, 2014 at 01:26 AM.
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Old December 11th, 2014, 09:36 PM   #1008
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...and this is another church of Vigevano, San Francesco, built in a late lombard brick franciscan gothic style between 1447 and 1475. The interior frescoes are all neogothic, but still beautiful!

The very simple and franciscan style brick gothic facade:



Image from wikimedia commons.



picture found in the webpage www.milanofotografo.it

And here's my few images, sorry but it was too dark inside, with almost no lights:











All the pictures are mine.
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Old December 12th, 2014, 08:16 PM   #1009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommolo View Post
San Marco Basilica:

San Marco's facade restored by Carlo Maciachini is really amazing!


Milano - Chiesa di San Marco in Brera by giovanni_novara, on Flickr


source: http://marco101milano.blogspot.it/


source: http://marco101milano.blogspot.it/


source: http://marco101milano.blogspot.it/
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Old December 12th, 2014, 08:21 PM   #1010
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Wow! So beautiful! Yes, Maciachini was a really great neo historicist architect! In he we can find the true spirit of the lombard brick gothic style! Really amazing! Thank you for your contribution, feel free to add whatever you like!
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Old December 13th, 2014, 01:14 AM   #1011
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He was a great architect, even though he committed some architectural crimes (like many others at that time)

Maybe a little OT, but I like particularly his project of the Pavia's Cathedral facade:


SOURCE: www.duomodipavia.it

based on the late 15th century wood model


SOURCE: www.duomodipavia.it


SOURCE: www.ilsettimanalepavese.com

...and this is the actual unfinished facade with the dome designed by Maciachini and completed in 1885.


SOURCE: www.duomodipavia.it


SOURCE: www.duomodipavia.it
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Old December 13th, 2014, 01:36 AM   #1012
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Yes, I love for instance the project for the Monumental Cemetery of Milan, it's really gorgeous, a very fine and elegant neogothic, very far away from those tacky gothic copies filled with romantic taste...he was truly medieval as a spirit, like Beltrami was.

By crimes you mean the demolition of the two romanesque churches in Pavia? Yes, I know, it has been an incredible crime, actually...I just can't get over it still now! I absolutely adore romanesque style...so sad for a jewel romanesque city as Pavia!
Anyway, we're not off topic at all! I de facto changed the theme of this thread into "monumental churches of the Milanese area", and I would also have changed the title of the thread too if it was possible, but I think it isn't possible...or it is? Mods? Are you there?
But no, you're not OT at all! We have extensely talked about how incredibly beautiful Pavia is, its Charterhouse, San Pietro in Ciel d'Oro and so on...
The project of the facade is gorgeous indeed, and the wooden model of the duomo is astonishing, really! It is in the beautiful Museums of the Castle of Pavia, along with many many masterpieces that includes Giovanni Bellini, Correggio, Francesco Hayez or Antonello da Messina, just to name a few. I hope it will be finished sometimes, along with the torre civica, whose pieces are still in the moat of the castle...

Have you got some image of the cathedral of Pavia? It is just soo beautiful!
Thank you for your comment!
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Old December 13th, 2014, 06:48 AM   #1013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommolo View Post
By crimes you mean the demolition of the two romanesque churches in Pavia? Yes, I know, it has been an incredible crime, actually...I just can't get over it still now! I absolutely adore romanesque style...so sad for a jewel romanesque city as Pavia!
Exactly I read that he also wanted to tear down San Pietro in Ciel d'Oro to obtain material for the construction of the cathedral

Quote:
Originally Posted by tommolo View Post
Anyway, we're not off topic at all! I de facto changed the theme of this thread into "monumental churches of the Milanese area", and I would also have changed the title of the thread too if it was possible, but I think it isn't possible...or it is? Mods? Are you there?
Then it's ok, since no one disagrees

Quote:
Originally Posted by tommolo View Post
I hope it will be finished sometimes, along with the torre civica, whose pieces are still in the moat of the castle...
I hope that too, but suddenly the moment is not the best (economically and culturally).

Quote:
Originally Posted by tommolo View Post
Have you got some image of the cathedral of Pavia? It is just soo beautiful!
No, I haven't yet, but I have to, since the interiors now after the restoration literally shines, and the crypt with the remains of the romanesque church of Santa Maria del Popolo is open to visitors. Probably I'll take few shots next year, when the new camera arrives! ^_^
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Old December 13th, 2014, 07:35 PM   #1014
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Thank you! I didn't know there was that plan with San Pietro in Ciel d'oro, along with Sant'Ambrogio in Milan the most important church of the first romanesque style...it would have been an incredibly sad loss!
Here you are an hommage to the beautiful Cathedral of Pavia, renaissance jewel. The dome is really huuuge, 97 meters tall! One of the tallest and widest dome in Italy!

the dome of the Pavia cathedral, so beautiful, really, words are not necessary in this case:



Picture from Flickr page of Luigi Colombo







From Flickr page of Carlo Danese



From Flickr page of Jesus P. Ponce



From Flickr page of Roberto Gastoni

...and here, in the post number #917 of this thread published last spring, you'll find some very old pictures of the duomo of Pavia made with my smartphone camera (low quality indeed, sorry for that!).

Dont' we love the bramantesque harmony of the Pavia cathedral? Just stunning!
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Old December 13th, 2014, 09:46 PM   #1015
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Impressive. Definitely one of the most airy and bright church I have been in.
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Old December 16th, 2014, 03:21 AM   #1016
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Today's pictures from Santa Maria delle Grazie basilica:





The interiors: this is the earlier gothic nave.







The counterfacade:





The Renaissance part by Bramante: the airy dome.



[IMG][/IMG]





The apse:









The niche-transept and the arch sustaining the vault of the dome:





The huge dome and the beginning of the gothic main nave after the arch:



Arches and cyrcles. In a word: Renaissance.



All pictures are mine.
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Old December 21st, 2014, 04:51 PM   #1017
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San Cristoforo al Naviglio little ancient church, sorry for the blurry images, but there was a warm, dim light on the inside that really boasted its atmosphere, but on the other hand it obstaculed the photo shooting...pros and cons

This is a very christmasy picture I found on the church's website, www.chiesasancristoforo.it:



As you can see, this little ancient gothic church is settled beside of the Naviglio Grande channel. This church is very unique, because it is a twin church, that is two naves with two apses one aside of the other. It is a type of church that in Milan we can find also in the Santa Maria Incoronata church. The more ancient church, the left one entering the temple, dates back to the 1300s and it has a wooden flat roof and a polygonal frescoed apsis, and the more recent one, the one on the right, has been built in the first years of 1400s in late gothic stile with crossed vault by Gian Galeazzo Visconti, Lord of Milan. For this reason it is known also as "Ducal chapel", and was built in order to celebrate the end of the plague of 1399, that killed more than 20,000 people in Milan and was stopped, they say, by St. Cristopher himself.

Here you are my (blurry) photos:















Two late 1400s frescoes maybe from the Zavattari school of Monza?



The right couter facade. There have been many studies about these two frescoes, painted in late gothic style even if we're in year 1403 or 1405. Scholars have pointed out how these frescoes have a sort of Giusto de' Menabuoi taste in them, a Giottesque author, and the anonymous painter may have been inspired by Giusto de' Menabuoi frescoes in San Viboldone Abbey, very close to Milan, or through a Milanese follower of Giusto, called Anovelo da Imbonate that actually have worked for Gian Galeazzo Visconti.



Here you are, above the enthroned Madonna and below the Crucifixion:



Detail of the Enthroned Madonna and the Crucifixion:



Also on the crossed vault, traces of late 1400s frescoes of the Zavattari school of Monza, maybe an Adoration of the Magii.







The baptistry:



Early renaissance frescoes:







Another crucifixion, this one too from late 1400s by Zavattari school of Monza?





A beautiful maybe luinesque renaissance painting:



Saint John the baptist statue:



Fresco, dating back to the late Quattrocento era (1400s), disputely attributed to the school of the Zavattaris, active in Monza. All the frescoes present on this part may have the same author(s)?



...and for this part there are of course less blurry images! It is the most important part of the church, artistically speaking: it is the renaissance frescoed apsis. It shows Renaissance frescoes from the early 1500s and they have been painted by a follower of Bernardino Luini, one of the great Old Masters of Lombardy's Renaissance, and indirect follower of Leonardo da Vinci.











A very ancient bizanthine-like or early romanesque Christos fresco:







...and, of course, the Nativity scene!



All images are mine.
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Last edited by tommolo; December 21st, 2014 at 05:24 PM.
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Old December 21st, 2014, 05:30 PM   #1018
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San Vincenzo in Prato, early romanesque structure rebuilt on a previous structure between IX and XI century. The facade is the very only "original" (even if it has rebuilt in romanesque era) paleochristian-style facade in Milan.









This fresco now used as an altarpiece it comes from the demolished church of San Calocero, once settled just in front of San Vincenzo. It represent a "Madonna del Pianto" (Madonna of the Cry) from the late 1400s and it is thought to be a work of the School of the Zavattaris of Monza, that, as we have already seen in the previous post about the San Cristoforo sul naviglio little church, have been working in Milan too in the late XV century.



(the decoration of the apsis are from the late XIX century)

on a side apsis, the Nativity scene:





All pictures but the first one are mine.
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Old December 21st, 2014, 06:05 PM   #1019
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Just in front of the huge building of the Tribunal of Milan, we can find the San Pietro in Gessate, a late gothic (naves) and early renaissance (apsis only) church built between years 1463 and 1497 by architect Guiniforte Solari, authors of many other monumental buildings in Milan, like the Ca' Granda (after Filarete), the Santa Maria alle Grazie church and the Certosa di Pavia charter house. Pictures from the Milano da Vedere facebook page, author Juan Gutierrez:





Polygonal side chapels:



Grifi chapel, frescoed by Renaissance masters Bernardino Butinone and Bernardino Zenale:



Other two polygonal gothic chapels:





The amazing Olbiano chapel, dating back to year 1485, containing paintings (altarpiece) and frescoes by Donato Montorfano, a big name in Lombardy's early Renaissance:

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Old December 21st, 2014, 07:49 PM   #1020
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Another picture from the Milano da Vedere Facebook page.
This is the Gothic Santa Maria del Carmine church, now is the catholic church for the English-speaking expats residing in Milan.
It has been built in late lombard gothic style from year 1400 until 1446.



The facade is a brilliant neogothic design from the excellent architect Carlo Maciachini, and has been built in 1880.



(picture: wikimedia commons, author: Welleschik)

The rose window (perhaps the best one in Milan) is an extraordinary example of what
Lombard artisans were able to do with terracotta carvings...it has just so much of lombardesque feeling in in it!



(picture: wikimedia commons, author: Giovanni dall'Orto)

Side rose window:



(picture: wikimedia commons, author: Giovanni dall'Orto)
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