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Old December 22nd, 2014, 02:46 AM   #1021
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A very small but ancient church beside Sant'Ambrogio basilica, the romanesque San Sigismondo, built in XI century. The interior has been rebuilt in gothic style with crossed vault.

Here you are a very old post about this small church in the post number #87 of this thread:

Quote:
Originally Posted by tommolo View Post
San Sigismondo ancient romanesque church baroque side
The cloisters you see above are the (unfinished) cloisters of Bramante, that you can find at the left side of the Sant'Ambrogio basilica. A door brings you directly into the Basilica from the cloisters.

And now I found also a picture of the interiors of this small church, often closed to the public:



From Flickr profile of Jim Forest.
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Old December 22nd, 2014, 03:04 AM   #1022
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San Marco basilica, one of the largest in Milan after the duomo cathedral.
The neogothic facade by Carlo Maciachini, built in 1871:



On the facade, we can find very ancient gothic statues, probably work of Giovanni di Balduccio, a tuscan artist that made also the amazing Ark of Saint Peter the Martyr in the Portinari Chapel in the Sant'Eustorgio basilica of Milan.
There is also who thinks that the statues are work of the Master of Viboldone (Maestro di Viboldone), another author that worked in the first half of 1300 in Milan.




(The two previous images are from Wikimedia commons, author MarkusMark)

...and another beautiful picture of Jim Forest, published in Flickr:

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Old December 22nd, 2014, 10:04 AM   #1023
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommolo View Post
A very small but ancient church beside Sant'Ambrogio basilica, the romanesque San Sigismondo, built in XI century. The interior has been rebuilt in gothic style with crossed vault.

Here you are a very old post about this small church in the post number #87 of this thread:



The cloisters you see above are the (unfinished) cloisters of Bramante, that you can find at the left side of the Sant'Ambrogio basilica. A door brings you directly into the Basilica from the cloisters.

And now I found also a picture of the interiors of this small church, often closed to the public:



From Flickr profile of Jim Forest.
It's the first time i see the inside of this church.
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Old December 22nd, 2014, 11:30 AM   #1024
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Yes, It's very often closed, they only open it for concerts (gospel concerts) or marriages (I first saw it on a friend's marriage, unluckily, I had no camera in that occasion ). You can see the events when they open it in Sant'Ambrogio parish webpage, the interiors are so simple and...so sweet that is just impossible not to love them!
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Old December 22nd, 2014, 01:54 PM   #1025
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Tahnks, and thanks for the nice collection of beautiful churches also unknown in Milan.
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Old December 23rd, 2014, 01:02 AM   #1026
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Tired of historical architecture? Now let's enter a little bit into a modern monumental church. This one is San Francesco al Fopponino church, designed by the great modern architect Gị Ponti between 1961 and 1964. It is a modern interpretation of a Gothic church, a style that is very often present in the milanese churches. There is the presence of angular structural elements instead of the pointed arches, yet resembling them. Another element is the hexagon, a sort of diamond very used as a symbol of modern architecture by Gị Ponti, here used as a sort of modern way to trascend the pointed stained glass windows of gothic architecture. Gị Ponti was a deep spiritual man, he used to attend the mass in this very church, "his own".

This church is a part of the vast programme about building churches in the newly added outskirts of the city that at the time had no churches or, where there were, they were too small. The programme was called "22 new churches for the 22 Councils", to celebrate the Vatican Council II.

I love this church, I think that with Gị Ponti we have the last architect that produces pieces of art everyone loves. After him, modern architecture have become somewhat controversial and a little bit too academical and unintellegible to the public opinion in many cases...
"Architecture is a diamond", he used to say...we see it in his creations...











The apsis, containing the largest painted altarpiece of all the 1900s, the "Canticle of the Sun", by Francesco Tabusso. We can appreciate Saint Francis and Saint Claire with an idyllic natural scenery, with a wood and a river. If you focus on the shape of the painting, you'll see that it is shaped like an "open book". Tabucchi also did all the 8 tryptics decorating the sides of the main nave of the church, representing episodes of the life of St. Francis.





Side chapel, all the (most beautiful) stained glass windows are works of art of Cristoforo de Amicis.





Side exit:



All pictures are mine.

(thanks to the very interesting Wikipedia article about this church, excellently written by SSC Italia user Friedrichstrasse)
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Old December 23rd, 2014, 01:12 AM   #1027
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San Gregorio Magno neoromanesque church, built between 1903 and 1908.

Facade:



Image from Wikimedia Commons, author Pufui Pc Pifpef I

And now the interiors, that actually have a more neogothic feelings in them than neoromanesque (see the pointed arch):







The fresco on the arch behind the altar, the "Crucifixion" of Luigi Morgari:





Google + auto composition:



All pictures but the first one are mine.
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Old December 23rd, 2014, 01:26 AM   #1028
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San Camillo de Lellis neogothic sanctuary, designed by the great "medievalist" architect Spirito Maria Chiappetta in 1900 and completed in 1912. Focus on the rose window above the main vault, a sort of big eye, a very original element.

The exteriors:



(image from the website: www.milanoneicantieridellarte.it)







The main altarpiece:



(the images above are from the website ttp://www.piazzascala.altervista.org)

And these are my images:

















the counterfacade:



The rose windows with stained glasses at the center of the vault:



Behind the apse, you can walk upon a stair and reach the Chapel of the Madonna della Salute (Madonna of the health), where you can find a pretty neomedieval painting and a window where you can see the whole church from "above", very beautiful. Spirito Maria Chiappetta, the architect, used this solution also for other neogothic churches he designed, like for instance the Madonna di Pompeii church in Vigevano that we saw earlier this year (see post number #908 of this forum or click here)



The nave seen from above the chapel:





One of the two transepts:



...and this is the most important part of the church, artistically speaking, a wooden carved via crucis, running around the whole church. It has been carved by Annibale Pagnone of the Artigianelli of Monza, and it shows more than 500 figures. It is amazing, let's watch it in detail:













As you can see, above the columns there is a huge cleristory, according a model used in french gothic:



An "artistical" image:

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Old December 23rd, 2014, 02:37 AM   #1029
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I prefer the last two Not that I don't like Gio Ponti architecture, but I think that in some way modern style kills the "sense of sacrality" you should feel inside a church.
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Old December 23rd, 2014, 02:52 AM   #1030
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I see your point! Modern architecture is "cold", formal, lines and surfaces, modules, schemes...while ornate architecture are of course more "human"...but I can see in Ponti's diamond-shaped building a reflection of a modern man stranded in a dizzy world trying to get back to truth, to an universal truth, a truth that shines like a diamond...Ponti's building are only "formally" modern to me, but in their essence are a critics to the modern architecture: he still follows beautiful harmonical shapes...his architecture has also been called as "neo liberty", that is neo Art Nouveau, because of his "ornate" yet modern architectures...but I see, the churches have canonical forms...you won't eat spaghetti shaped like a sausage, don't you? Same here, you would hesitate in calling "church" a modern building...the church have to be old, sacred, somewhat far from you, from a different age, a different period...thank you for your comment, you're always very welcome!
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Old December 24th, 2014, 04:43 PM   #1031
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...since today is Christmas Eve, I want to share with all you very kind readers and followers my dearest whish for you of a great, unique and merry Christmas! I can't find another way to tell you but using an old picture of the monumental church of Milan par excellence: the Duomo cathedral!



Merry Christmas and happy new year! In 2015 you know what to do, go and visit Milan during the World Expo fair!
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Old December 24th, 2014, 09:01 PM   #1032
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Regarding the church of San Vicenzo in Prato is curious facade paleochristian.
After the conquest of the lombards by Charlemagne and the Treaty of Verdun, Milan in the ninth century is in the kingdom of Italy, logically would have to be a church lombard or carolingian.
There are many churches paleochristian later in northern Italy.
This shows the great influence classical and Byzantine (from the focus of Ravenna) and because the high middle ages italian is not as dark as in other parts of Europe.
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Old December 24th, 2014, 09:28 PM   #1033
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Yes it is interesting indeed, and it shows that in Milan the civil power have always been in the hands of those who detained the religious power, from Saint Ambrose on.
Milan may have changed its formal administration and have been under many many different dominions, the Germans, the French, the Spanish, the Austrians...but at the end of the day, who commanded in Milan was the Bishop, and the "dominator" always knew this so well...this is the reason because of the lack of grand civil buildings in Milan and the presence of one of the biggest churches of Christianity (see above): this have something to say about who was actually in charge!

So, rebuilding a facade or a church even in the German Milan of the Ninth century, was a bishop's business, and few words were left to speak to the Germanic lords...

Thank for your comment and Feliz Navidad, prospero año y felicidad jejejeejej!
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Old December 28th, 2014, 04:15 AM   #1034
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As you may have notice, the title of this thread has changed, to let us feel more free to add the many monumental churches & temples you can find not just in the city centre, but also around Milan.

Santa Maria della Croce renaissance central plan church, in Crema, some 40 kms east of the Duomo cathedral of Milan. The Sanctuary was designed by one of the best Bramante's followers: Giovanni Battagio. He was inspired also by Giovanni Antonio Amadeo and Leonardo da Vinci (in his studies of a perfect central plan building). Giovanni Battagio also worked in Milan, in the bramantesque Santa Maria presso San Satiro church and also in Lodi, where he designed another domed central plan building, the Tempio Civico dell'Incoronata, that we saw earlier in this thread. Construction started in 1490 and the temple was completed around year 1500. In the interior, we can appreciate the early XVIII century frescoes by Giacomo Pallavicino, in the lower order he painted the Episodes of St. Theresa of Avila and in the dome he painted the Triumph of the Cross.

From Wikimedia commons, images shot in a sunny day:





The exteriors, images taken by me today, in a very snowy day as you can see. So much christmasy was the atmosphere I have to admit!













The interiors:





























One of the four little apsis:



The beautiful altarpiece, the "Assumption of the Virgin", a Renaissance painting by Giovanni Rusconi, a High Renaissance painter also known as "il Diana", a follower of Giovanni Bellini, Vittore Carpaccio and Jacopo Palma the Older, the chromatism choosen in this work shows a strong Venetian influence in his paintings.



The crypt:





All of the previous pictures but the first two are mine.

A sight of the interior:



Picture found on Lombardia da Vedere's Facebook page, image shot by Stefano Bertelli.

...And this is a photo I found in Panoramio of the interior of one of the little cross-shaped little apse:



Image by Panoramio user Roberto Rubiliani.
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Old December 28th, 2014, 11:24 AM   #1035
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The "duomo" or the cathedral of Crema, built in lombard romanesque-brick gothic style between year 1284 and 1341. It is the most ancient
religious building in Crema.



(image from the webpage http://rete.comuni-italiani.it )

It shows on the facade many lombard style terracotta decorations, and also two "finestra a vento", that is "windy windows", two windows that are not opened to the inside of the church to bring in the light but directly to the sky, a very frequent element in Lombardy romanesque and gothic churches (in Lombardy there has never been a fracture between romanesque and gothic style, just a gradual evolution: nave just started to grow taller and taller and the arches become gradually pointed arches).

Here you are a "Finestra a Vento" from Wikimedia commons:



...and here you are my pictures taken yesterday in a snowy day:







The ghirlandina, the campanile of the duomo:



The interiors, recently restored:











Delicately carved steps:



Left side carved steps:



right side apsis:





the counterfacade:



The flat main apse:



The main apse altarpiece:



It is a huge painting:





The nave seen from the main altar:



The right side nave:



A very ancient hanging golden cross:



The miraculous crucifixion of the Duomo of Crema: it is a wooden sculpture from year 1250 to 1275, probably of french manufacture, with a very suffering facial expression. It is interesting to see its history to understand why it is considered to be miraculous: We are in year 1448, a harsh period of Crema, during a Guelphs and Ghibelline religious civil war, it was threatened of being burned. Incredibly, not only the cross did not burn, but the two feet were find opened, as if the wooden legs, carved as one, have moved by their own will!



(image by www.cremaonline.it)

All pictures except the first two and the last one are mine.
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Old December 28th, 2014, 09:24 PM   #1036
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommolo View Post
...since today is Christmas Eve, I want to share with all you very kind readers and followers my dearest whish for you of a great, unique and merry Christmas! I can't find another way to tell you but using an old picture of the monumental church of Milan par excellence: the Duomo cathedral!



Merry Christmas and happy new year! In 2015 you know what to do, go and visit Milan during the World Expo fair!
Great! Do you know how the cleaning of the interior surfaces is progressing?

...and Merry Xmas (sorry for the delay )
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Old December 28th, 2014, 10:06 PM   #1037
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...and a happy new year to you!

They've finished the right trasept, but when I walked in for the last time, a few day before christmas, I saw no signs of further cleaning, at least not for now...I guess we'll see progress after the Expo, meanwhile they'd want to keep the cathedral 100% open to the public, me thinks!
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Old January 3rd, 2015, 02:03 AM   #1038
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Ok let's move a little bit around Milan to discover another romanesque jewel almost 1000 years old! I hope you like it as I do!

Abbazia del Cerreto former abbey, originally dedicated to the saint Peter and Paul, a former Cistercian monastry located in Abbadia Cerreto, near Lodi, 36 kms south east of the Duomo cathedral of Milan.
This abbey was created in year 1084 by Alberico da Cassino (Alberic of Monte Cassino), as a Benedectine Monastry. It was later given to the Cistercians in year 1139 by Pope Innocent II. The monastry was closed during the Napoleonic domination, and it is used still today as the main parish of Abbadia Cerreto, the Beata Vergine Maria church.

Architecturally, it shows all the main features of the great early phase of Lombard Romanesque style, or Lombard Gothic. Its crossed vault main nave and its brick facade are a living manifesto of how advanced was the sacred architecture in Lombardy right after the year 1000.



the side and the tower:





Images from SSC Italia user Friederichstrasse



Image from the website www.avvenire.it

Interiors:



Pictures by SSC Italia user Friederichstrasse.



from the webpage www.andreadamontefeltro.it



Image from put.edidomus.it



Image from Gabriele Bellotti



Image from Panoramio user elio1952



Image from Panoramio user Gaudenzio Ghilardi







Pictures from the website www.lombardiabeniculturali.it

Last edited by tommolo; January 3rd, 2015 at 02:15 AM.
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Old January 18th, 2015, 04:30 PM   #1039
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An Ecleptic and Liberty (Art Nouveau) style church, Sant'Andrea, in the Porta Romana district of Milan:



The building of this large church (55 meters long) was started in 1902 and stopped in 1904, when the facade and part of the interiors were still unfinished. The design iof this church is from Cesare Nava, that designed many others temples in Milan and Lombardy. The interiors are really regal because of the different marbles used for the columns (each column has a different kind of marble) and the floor is in marble too (marble Botticino and Nero Olicchio). The facade has been completed just in 1987, and this shows how beautiful buildings may still be completed still in modern era in a classical way, even in the most "classical orthodox" european country that Italy is.

[IMG]http://oi60.************/25p798z.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://oi62.************/2wlzps0.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i59.************/2u9mqe1.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://oi61.************/1zd2m3t.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://oi57.************/1624j9t.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://oi62.************/1zwgcxe.jpg[/IMG]

Ancent columns of the previous church reutilized in the "new" church. Prior to Sant'Andrea, there was the church of San Rocco, built at the end of 1400s. A second church, bigger, was built in 1791 and demolished in 1900 to build this new, even bigger church, since the district grew in population. The dedication name was changed from San Rocco to Sant'Andrea in honout to the Archbishop of Milan Andrea Ferrari.

[IMG]http://oi62.************/25ivyut.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://oi58.************/969wtu.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://oi62.************/2l95anm.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://oi62.************/23mt2rc.jpg[/IMG]

This is the polyptich of the renaissance Leonardesque painter Cesare da Sesto from year 1521, that was the masterpiece of the ancient San Rocco church, now at the Pinacoteca del Castello Sforzesco of Milan.



This statue is the only work of art that comes from the ancient church of San Rocco still present in the modern Sant'Andrea church:

[IMG]http://oi59.************/14d2hyc.jpg[/IMG]

Thanks to the friends of www.urbanfilemilano.blogspot.com that published these beautiful images, where SSC Italia user Skymino is credited as the author of the article.

Last edited by tommolo; January 18th, 2015 at 11:23 PM.
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Old January 20th, 2015, 09:53 AM   #1040
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Those stations of the cross are absolutely amazing examples of talented wood carvers.
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