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Old March 22nd, 2015, 04:35 PM   #1061
tommolo
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...and a touch of gorgeous and heavy roman mannerism in the heart of Milan, very close to Sant'Ambrogio romanesque basilica. This is the basilica of San Vittore al corpo, one of the largest in Milan, built by the mannerist architect Galeazzo Alessi in late 1500s.



and the beautiful dome:



Pictures found in Milano da Vedere's Facebook page shot by Marta Segre and Juan Gutierrez.
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Old March 22nd, 2015, 09:45 PM   #1062
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The San Barnaba church in Milan, a splendid example of mannerist church built by the great architect Galeazzo Alessi in year 1561. The interiors have been decorated by Camillo Procaccini in year 1625.



The interiors:







Details of the beautifully carved mannerist facade:



Pictures found in Milano da Vedere's Facebook profile.

A beautiful reliquary in a side chapel:



Picture found in Wikimedia Commons, image published by Maurizio OM Ongaro
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Old March 31st, 2015, 08:43 PM   #1063
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The grandest Art Deco basilica in Milan, the Santi Nereo e Achilleo church. It was built between 1937 and 1940 by architect Giovanni Maria Maggi by will of the Cardinal and Archbishop of Milan Ildefonso Schuster.
The dimensions are huge: the interiors are 65 meters long and 28 meters wide. The church is a Minor Basilica since January the 17th of 1990, by will of Pope John Paul II.
it is a very scenographical church that stand at the end of a huge alley (viale Argonne) with sometimes spoil interiors that definitely needs more (even modern) frescoes on the inside to fulfil its monumental potential.









A vintage picture:









The porticoes facing the main facade, like in St. Ambroise, a very neoromanesque structure. Even the lombard romanesque bricks are a tribute to tradition:



The interiors:







The counterfacade:



The side naves:







The main altar:





The interior of the huge dome:





All images are coming from the Urbanfile Milano article: www.urbanfilemilano.blogspot.com
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Old March 31st, 2015, 09:02 PM   #1064
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Santi Nereo e Achilleo art deco basilica part II, the main jewel, the chapel of Our Lady of Fatima (Madonna di Fatima), frescoed at the end of World War II (1948) by the painter Vanni Rossi, and strongly wanted by the citizen of the neoghborhood. It is a sort of a "modern Sixtine chapel", with deep anti-war meanings. It is definitely worth a close analisis:





The vault:







The crucifixion:





Details of the crucifixion:



Above the Cross:



Details of the frescoes, everyday people:





The three sheperd childrens of Fatima:



Details of the vault, above the altar:



The Baptism of Jesus:



The entrance to the chapel, with frescoed a Holy Family:



The main altar, depicting the appearence of Our Lady of Fatima at the three shepherd childrens:



...and here it is the highest lyrical moment in these frescoes, yet one of the lowest moment in the whole history of mankind: the depiction of the atomic fungus, presumably of Hiroshima or Nagasaki, behing the scene where Christ bear its Cross. The symbolical meaning is clear. Never more!



Detail of it:



Pictures published by Urbanfile Milano at www.urbanfilemilano.blogspot.com
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Old April 8th, 2015, 04:21 PM   #1065
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Some important artworks from the San Giorgio a Palazzo church, a very ancient church (the first mention of it dates back to year 750) which now has a baroque and neoclassical looking.

The baroque facade by Francesco Croce:



The interior, rebuilt in neoclassical style between the years 1800 and 1821 and then the dome, the apsis and the campanile was built in year 1899 by Alfonso Parrocchetti.





The first chapel on the right has a most important renaissance masterpiece from one of the northern Italy renaissance old masters: Gaudenzio Ferrari, which painted it in 1545.



the baroque chapel:



detail of the Masterpiece of Ferrari:



Another masterpiece, even greater than the painting of ferrari, is the Cappella della Passione, painted in year 1516 by the leonardesque high renaissance master Bernardino Luini, an amazing artist totally underrated yet. It deserves to stay in the Olympus of the great renaissance painters, really:





Wow, this is really breathtaking!



a close up of the central scene, the Deposition of Christ:



All the pictures comes from the post dedicated to San Giorgio al Palazzo church published in the Urbanfile Milano website (in Italian).

Here you can also enjoy a video with many images of the interiors of this little yet very rich and artsy church
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Old April 14th, 2015, 03:55 AM   #1066
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Santi Gervasio e Protasio church in Gorgonzola, Metropolitan city of Milan, 18,5 kilometers east to the Duomo cathedral of Milan, easy to reach with the Milan Underground line 2.
This is a really interesting and "different" neoclassical church designed by the architect Simone Cantoni between the years 1806 and 1820 by the will of Gian Galeazzo Serbelloni, lord of Gorgonzola. Yes, this is the place where the mythical blue cheese Gorgonzola draws its name, even if it's produced all over the milanese green belt.

The exteriors:



The main facade:





Please compare it with another creation of Simone Cantoni in Milan, the Palazzo Serbelloni, built for the same noble family, the Serbelloni, in year 1793 (the facade):



At both sides of the main facades, thre are two symmetrical chapels:



The church reflected by the Naviglio Martesana, linking Gorgonzola to the northern districts of Milan. The bell tower is 52 meters tall:



Here you can see well the two symmetrical chapels at the sides of the facade. On the
left, the Serbelloni Mausoleum, built by Simone Cantoni in year 1776, the same year of the American Declaration of Indipendence .
As well as many Serbellonis, Simone Cantoni is buried there too, in the crypt.
On the right, the Santissima Trinità chapel, built in the half of the XIX century.





The interiors:



The apsis:



Detail of the apsis:



The main nave and the counterfacade:



Details of the dome:



The Serbelloni Mausoleum by Simone Cantoni, with frescoes of Domenico Pozzi, representing the "Vision of the Prophet Ezekiel":



A global view of the main facade:



All the picture without watermark are from Wikimedia Commons.
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Old April 15th, 2015, 01:25 AM   #1067
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wow, it's fantastic art-deco church and a link to the lombard tradition, the cimborrio reminds me of santa maria della grazie
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Old April 15th, 2015, 02:21 AM   #1068
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Thank you! Yes, it's a very interesting church, very scenographical too since it is located at the end of Viale Argonne, a 1 kilometer long and 90-meters wide boulevard at the east end of the city. And I'm really glad you've notice the typical lombard red bricks and the red-white drawing of the dome reminding the Bramantesque Santa Maria alle Grazie yet in an art deco design. In that phase of Italian art (late twenties, thirties) there was a sort of Ritorno all'Ordine, "Return to order", or to a simplified neoclassical design (or in this case, simplified neoromanesque) in the step of the Art Deco movement, exalting the geometry and the pure volumes of buildings. In Italy that style was called "Novecento" and was seen with favour by the infamous regime for its rethorical value (even if -to tell you the truth- the Razionalismo Italiano, or italian modernism, was actually promoted by fascism, unlike it was in Germany, where modernism was seen as "degenerated art").
In this Ritorno all'ordine, we can see early romanesque features in church architecture coming back from romanesque era, like the external baptistry or the external portico, like we can see in this basilica.

Here you can see the external baptistry on the right of the basilica, external to the (romanesque themed) portico:



Here you are the baptistry:



And this is the interior of the baptistry:



The dome of the baptistry:



Here on the side of the basilica you can see the baptistry:

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Old April 15th, 2015, 02:49 AM   #1069
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommolo View Post
The San Barnaba church in Milan, a splendid example of mannerist church built by the great architect Galeazzo Alessi in year 1561. The interiors have been decorated by Camillo Procaccini in year 1625.
The interiors:



Very beautiful interiors.
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“In keeping silent about evil, in burying it so deep within us that no sign of it appears on the surface, we are implanting it, and it will rise up a thousand fold in the future. When we neither punish nor reproach evildoers we are thereby ripping the foundations of justice from beneath new generations.”

“The meaning of earthly existence lies not, as we have grown used to thinking, in prospering but in the development of the soul.”
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"We are more closely connected to the invisible than to the visible"

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Old April 15th, 2015, 02:55 AM   #1070
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Thank you!
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Old April 15th, 2015, 12:19 PM   #1071
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Yes, the truth is that it is a very suggestive church with the play of volumes, with the pace of openings, and with those allusions to vernacular architecture. Flying the imagination could be part of a painting of Giorgio de Chirico
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Old April 20th, 2015, 04:55 AM   #1072
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San Martino basilica dedicated to Saint Martin of Tours, in Treviglio, 32,5 kilometers east of the Duomo cathedral of Milan.

The baroque facade and the very tall bell tower, 65 meters high:



The bell tower was built in year 1100-1200 in romanesque-gothic style to be a civic tower to observe the borders (Treviglio was for many centuries the border between two enemy states: Milan and Venice, separated by the river Adda):



The facade is really beautiful:



The piazza in front of the basilica:





...and this is the most valued masterpiece of this important basilica, the Polyptych of Saint Martin of Tours, by Bernardo Butinone and Bernardino Zenale, a Masterpiece of Lombard Renaissance.
This global masterpiece represent the frames of this complex work as an immaginary "bramantesque" architecture. In this masterpiece we can find still gothic element in the style of painting of the figures yet renaissance
atmosphere in the composition, somewhat like we can find in Vincenzo Foppa, an High Renaissance Lombardy old Master. This style will be swept off by Tuscan Renaissance masters like Leonardo da Vinci, visting Milan at the end of 1400s.
The Polyptych was painted between year 1485 and 1505 and its dimensions are huge: 594X363 cm! 6 meters tall and 3,5 wide! Monumental! This explain why they took 20 years to finish it. But the result is totally awe-inspiring!



Details of the painted scenes:





others scenes:



Detail:







Of course, for this work they took inspiration from the Pala di San Zeno in Verona, by Andrea Mantegna, the very first Renaissance piece of art produced in northern Italy between years 1457 and 1460. There you have the Pala di San Zeno, just watch the "architecture" of the painting, with columns and so on...it is just so similar to the polyptyc of San Martin of Tours in Treviglio isn't it?



Some images of the beautiful baroque interiors.

The main nave:



The counterfacade:



Detail of the illusionistic baroque frescoes on the main nave, simulating an architecture beyond the vault, towards the skies:



More details of the beautiful interiors:



the apsis:



the frescoed vault:

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Old April 20th, 2015, 06:53 AM   #1073
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Wonderful post with such beautiful detail. Thanks Tommolo.
Martin of Tours is very interesting to me.
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“In keeping silent about evil, in burying it so deep within us that no sign of it appears on the surface, we are implanting it, and it will rise up a thousand fold in the future. When we neither punish nor reproach evildoers we are thereby ripping the foundations of justice from beneath new generations.”

“The meaning of earthly existence lies not, as we have grown used to thinking, in prospering but in the development of the soul.”
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

"We are more closely connected to the invisible than to the visible"

-Novalis

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Old April 21st, 2015, 03:24 AM   #1074
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Thank you very much! And now a church that is really impressive, yet is closed and impossible to see, we hope to see it open anytime soon because it really deserves it.
It is San Paolo Converso, the twin church of San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore that we have enjoyed many many times here. The church, built in mannerist style between 1546 and 1631, is now used by privates as an architectural studio and it was opened during the Milan Design Week (the "Fuorisalone").
The structures of the office are completely removable, but we hope to see a deep restoration of this amazing monument very very soon to let it open to enjoy.
All pictures are from SSC Italia user Balthazar, that kindly agreed in letting me republish his interesting pictures. Thank you!



The main altar:



the side chapels, what you see are the design installations of the Fuorisalone:



A beautiful altarpiece:



The illusionistic vault, painted by the most important lombard mannerist author in the second half of the XVI century, Giulio Campi. The Campi family (and in this case the brothers Giulio, Antonio and Vincenzo) was
very important artistical team in the Charles Borromeo's Milan, and the San Paolo Converso church houses paintings and canvas by all of the three brothers. According Marco Tanzi, the frescoes in San Paolo Converso represents one of their highest artistical achievement (source: this post in Italian). The style of the Campis painters was based upon Giulio Romano's school, that was the pupil of Raffaello Sanzio.



Fake architectures, early ones, we're still in 1500s, not in the Baroque era!



The complete sight of the vault:



---------- these pictures were all by SSC Italia user Balthasar-------------------------------

The main altar of the public hall, behind it there is the hall once reserved to the nuns, frescoes as well, now used as a private office:



Ready?





This is the removable office inside the nun's hall:



We hope to see it removed soon!



The vault of the nun's hall:



And this is the crypt:



This is the beautiful late mannerist/early baroque facade of the church, built between 1611 and 1619 by design of Giovan Battista Crespi, called the Cerano, another very big name in the Milanese Seicento.





We hope to see this deconsecrated church reopened to tourism and totally restored very soon!
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Old April 21st, 2015, 01:47 PM   #1075
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fascinating deconsecrated church that seems neapolitan or palermitan atmosphere, with candle smoke accumulated over centuries
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Old April 21st, 2015, 03:47 PM   #1076
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Yes you're right! During the last years lots of similar churches have been restored and opened to the public, but this one is still private and generally not visitable, that's a pity...I'd like to see it restored, even if it would means to lose that "shabby chic" southern italian allure
The frescoes there definately needs a restorations because they're one of the most important late 1500s frescoes in Lombardy...thanks for the comment!
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Old May 3rd, 2015, 04:15 AM   #1077
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Milano - città dei miracoli
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Old May 4th, 2015, 03:41 AM   #1078
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grazie del commento!

Translation: "Milan, the city of miracles". In a sense it is so, it's very hard to find a modern looking city with such a continuum of hight to excellent standart of artistical and architectural production. Not necessarily Milan is the best city to look at any of the architectural styles that one can appreciate there, but definitely it offers you a very complete landscape of Europe's artistical high points throughout the last, say, 1700 years. Not a single style has been skipped, and not a single style has been completely deleted since then.

That said, let's move noth west of Milan, to see one of the biggest city of the Milan metro area, Varese. We are 48,5 kms northwest of the Duomo cathedral of Milan. Here you can find the Basilica of San Vittore. This basilica had a very large and complex building process: the apse is the oldest part, since it has been built after year 1542, and in the year 1580, when Charles Borromeo was the archbishop of Milan, the church interiors were designed by Pellegrino Tibaldi, the most important architect of the Milan's counter-reformation period. The neoclassical façade was built at the end of 1700s by Leopold Pollack, the pupil of Giuseppe Piermarini, the architect of the Teatro alla Scala of Milan.

The facade:





...and the huuuge bell tower, standing 77 meters tall. The bell tower has been built between years 1617 and 1773.







The amazing interiors:



The frescoes of the vault of the main nave are from year 1846 (painter G.B. Zari) and the stoccoeas of the vault are from Luigi Pogliaghi (1929), the author of the Main Portal of the Duomo cathedral of Milan.

The apse:



The chapel of the rosary (cappella del rosario) on the inside, by the Morazzone, painted between 1598-1599 and 1615-1617.



The dome:



The most important piece of art of the inside of the basilica, the painting "St. Gregory delivers the soul of a Monk", by Giovan Battista Crespi said "Il Cerano", an intense early baroque piece of art painted in 1617:



...and this is the external Baptistry of San Giovanni Battista, and high medieval builting built before the year 1061, the year of the first mention of the existence of this building in an official document.



All the previous pictures are from Wikimedia commons.

Others pictures of the Baptistry:



The interiors in some vintage pictures:













All the previous images are from the website www.lombardiabeniculturali.it
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Old May 4th, 2015, 07:11 PM   #1079
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The bell tower by Giuseppe Bernascone is one of my favourites in Lombardy, so elegant!


http://www.panoramio.com/photo/37841...=kh.google.com


http://static.panoramio.com/photos/large/37376372.jpg


Bernascone was also the main architect behind the design of the Sacred Mount of Varese chapels


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Old May 4th, 2015, 07:19 PM   #1080
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Yes it's very legant...it looks like a skyscraper when you actually see it, so tall! It reminds me a little bit the bell tower of the Basilica of Santo Stefano maggiore near the duomo in Milan, started in 1643 by Carlo Buzzi and completed in 1674 by Gerolamo Quadrio. It's actually a lot smaller, but it's the same kind of...what can we say? Lombard early baroque?







Maybe we'll talk about the UNESCO World Heritage site of the Sacro Monte of Varese and its loads of arts anytime soon. What do you readers think?

All pictures comes from Wikimedia Commons.
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