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Old August 16th, 2015, 10:03 PM   #1121
aljuarez
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Breathtaking, as usual, my friend!
Milano and its region are definitely not behind much more visited places, such as Venice, Florence and Rome! 2016 is the year I will finally visit this beautiful region!
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Old August 16th, 2015, 10:23 PM   #1122
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You'll be very welcome then!
Who knows? Maybe sometime soon this thread will have your pictures shown here!
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Old September 14th, 2015, 01:00 AM   #1123
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I officially declare this thread back from Summer vacations!

Let's start a new year of beautiful surprises and hidden jewel from where we left it before the august nap: Monza.
I found these beautiful images of the Duomo di Monza cathedral taken from the website www.milanofotografo.it
I find these pictures very beautiful and very representativeof what you find when you actually enters into the Duomo of Monza.



The main altar:



The dome:



The main nave:



the beautiful organ at the crossing of the nave, just before the dome and the altar:



The beautiful transept:



The main nave as seen from the entrance:



The main altar:





The vault of the apse:



The chapel beside of the apse, on the transept:



The main nave and the very big stained-glass rose window on the counterfacade:



Very baroque side chapels (from 1700s):



The dome (at the top of the image) and the "Tree of Jesse" fresco on the wall of the transept, from the mannerist painters Giuseppe Arcimboldo and Giuseppe Meda:



Yes, Giuseppe Arcimboldo is the artist famous for his fruit-made portraits like this one:



The vault of the transept:



Medieval details facing from the baroque frescoes:



Will continue on part II
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Old September 14th, 2015, 01:51 AM   #1124
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...and here we are! Monza Cathedral part II:









The pulprit:



The baptistry:





The gothic apse and the bell tower:



Detail of the Lombard brick gothic apse of the Monza cathedral:



As I mentioned before, all the pictures are to be credited to www.milanofotografo.it
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Old September 21st, 2015, 04:17 AM   #1125
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Beside Sant'Ambrogio basilica, central Milan, you can find this little chapel, the Chapel of the Passion, a very tiny structure built in XVI century that was once filled with frescoes. Now it has lost part of its artistical richness, but you can see beautiful artworks from the 1500s when you enter this structure. It may results curious to notice that part of the frescoes decorating the Chapel of the Passion are now shown at the Victoria and Albert museum in London.
We hope to see them back in town anytime soon!



The chapel is now used for exhibitions:



details of the beautiful vault:









The apsis and the fresco of the Blessing Christ:



Very Bergognone-ish this fresco...



other frescoes and details:







The counter facade:





All pictures are mine.
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Old September 21st, 2015, 02:56 PM   #1126
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Next exhibition at the Prado Museum, translated with google

Seamless art. The size of the crystal in the Milanese Renaissance
*Madrid, Prado Museum
October 14, 2015 January 10, 2016
Room D

Since the mid-sixteenth century, artists and workshops of the Italian city of Milan stressed in size rock crystal, a natural gem, creating masterpieces difficult to overcome, who enjoyed the common admiration of his contemporaries, with an economic valuation much higher the great creations of the painting of his time.

Aimed at large princely collections are, at once, sculptures and useful objects, strange and wonderful unusual inventions whose proportions evident in many cases, a thorough knowledge of the classical world, to which is added the skill in carving mineral, made with closely guarded methods in an environment of constant experimentation close to the ideas of Leonardo da Vinci.

From the point of view sculptures they stand out for their aesthetic and technical quality, and figurative representations in them. As intellectual elaborations, it consider reflection of Renaissance thought and Renaissance tardo-, even to visually interpret esoteric and magical affairs.

The main objective of this exhibition is to present to the public a concept of art with which you are unfamiliar, for what have been selected fourteen of the most beautiful parts of the "Treasure of the Dolphin" (part of the estate of Philip V Bourbon), which works by first rank from Florence and Paris meet
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Old September 21st, 2015, 03:57 PM   #1127
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Extremely interesting! I was in Madrid on Friday for a stop over, next time I'll try to go and visit this exhibition!
Milan was specialized in goldsmith and armory techniques, but also has definitely a tradition in crystal artworks. In the decorative arts museum of the Sforza Castle you can find an extensive collection of it, and also in two other institutions, the Pinacoteca Ambrosiana and of course in the Poldi Pezzoli museum, lots of crystal glasses.
But the root of this art is definitely one of the most beautiful roman crystal pieces:
the Diatreta Trivulzio, a crystal knitwork that draws your breath away shown at the Archeological Museum of Milan:



This IV century jewel shows the tradition of crystal artworks in Milan, a late roman art form that shone at the time when Milan was capital of the Western Roman empire.

Thanks for sharing, Franciscoc!
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Old September 21st, 2015, 05:33 PM   #1128
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Indeed, besides the work of the glass, arms production in the sixteenth century in Milan was the most prestigious of Europe together with Augsburg, with the outstanding example of Filippo Negroli
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Old September 24th, 2015, 07:50 PM   #1129
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Yes, it indeed was!

I think many of the milanese armours can be now found at the Palacio Real, at the Real Armeria, isn't it? Next time I'll visit it, by the way, are there plan of opening anytime soon the Collecciones Reales? I read somewhere so...

Santo Sepolcro church, we are very close to the Duomo cathedral of Milan, in the heart of the Cinque Vie district, the most ancient part of Milan.
This church was originally built in the year 1030 but was later renovated in baroque style. At the end of the XIX century, at least the facade was restored to romanesque style.

Let's see some picture of the interiors!



The two side chapel at the entrance, architecture by Francesco Maria Richini and paintings by Carlo Francesco Nuvolone (early baroque):







sorry, this one is lame



The most beautiful terracotta statues of the Last Supper, it reminds me of the Sacro Monte of Lombardy and Piedmont, it's the same kind of artistical sensibility, and done during XVI century, so contemporary to some Sacro Monte:





Tryptich of the death of Christ:





Details, the artistical level of the statues is incredibly high:



Look at the facial expressions:



Saint Peter's betrayal:



More details of the other sculptural work, the Last Supper:





So real!





A beautiful painting on the inside:



The righ chapel at the entrance:



All the pictures are mine.
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Old September 25th, 2015, 10:05 PM   #1130
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Another "modern" church, the Santi Pietro e Paolo church in Lissone, one of the biggest around Milan. It has been built in neoromanesque/neogotic style in 1926, and due to its huge dimensions (80 meters long, 50 meters wide at the transept, the bell tower is 78 meters tall) it is also called the "duomo di Lissone", like it was a cathedral, which is not. It's anyway considerably big.
We're 17 kilometers north of the Duomo cathedral of Milan.



The campanile, or bell tower, is one of the tallest of the area, is 77,45 meters tall.



The interiors, in a beautiful italianate neogotic style:

















The main altar:



The counterfacade:





The left transept:



The right transept:





Wow! I'm very proud of this picture hehehe! (it was the camera's merit anyway, I just pushed a button, it's an all automatic camera!)



The beautifully decorated dome, that reminds us the Portinari chapel in Sant'Eustorgio:



Also the carved marble altar is somewhat Sant'Eustorgio-eish



Detail of the beautiful and tall dome:



Main nave and side aisles:



Beside the main altar:





From the transept looking at the nave:







The beautifully wooden carved confessional was a joy of ecleptic decorative arts & skills:



There were a LOT of carved confessionals!



One last awe before going out:



All the pictures are mine.

Here you are some more pictures I found this time in Wikimedia commons:



The tall bell tower or campanile:



The interior decoration of the dome:



Another beautiful wooden carved confessional, this one is called "del Monsignor Prevosto", of the "monseigneur provost", one of the best of the collection:



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Old September 28th, 2015, 08:14 PM   #1131
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how wonderful these terracotta sculptures, a few decades later groups in terracotta by Guido Mazzoni and Niccolò dell'Arca, early Renaissance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tommolo View Post
I think many of the milanese armours can be now found at the Palacio Real, at the Real Armeria, isn't it? Next time I'll visit it, by the way, are there plan of opening anytime soon the Collecciones Reales? I read somewhere so...
there are some fantastic armor of the Milanese workshops, authentic works of art of his time (It's the best collection of weapons along with Vienna). It would be included in the future museum of Royal Collections, which will also house some of the world's best collections of tapestries and Stradivarius instruments of Cremona. The opening is scheduled for late 2016.
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Old September 29th, 2015, 06:52 PM   #1132
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Thank you very much! I'll visit the new Royal Collection museum when it'll open!

A picture about San Fedele church I found on Milano da Vedere's Facebook page, credited to Stefano Paletti. This church is very important because it's the archetypical counter-reformation church with all the features that St. Charles Borromeo wanted in an ideal counter-reformed temple. St. Charles, at the time he led the counter-reformation movement (with St. Ignatius of Loyola and St. Philip Neri) at the Council of Trento, was the Archbishop of Milan. There are many formal-proportional similarities with this church and the Il Gesù church in Rome, the mother church of the Jesuites, even though this Milanese church is quite smaller:

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Old September 30th, 2015, 11:48 PM   #1133
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San Giorgio church and Canonica (rectory) of Bernate Ticino.
The story of the church and the rectory of Bernate begun in 1186,when the pope Urban III let the Augustian Friars to set in Bernate Ticino.
Today's mannerist church was begun in the year 1582, under the architect Martino Bassi. Under the church there is also a crypt that is almost 800 years old, from the 1200s. This is the most ancient part of the church, still in romanesque style, made with bricks. Unfortunately, at the moment I have no pictures of this crypt. Beside of the church, there is the very important Renaissance building (from the 1500s) of the Canonica (the Rectory), also known as "Il Castello", the castle, because of its very monumental and solid palatial looking. The Canonica is also known as Palazzo Visconti...this building have just too many nicknames!

Here you are some picture of San Giorgio church of Bernate Ticino, these are pictures I found on Panoramio, shot by the user antonio.aina:





The XVI century Palazzo Visconti:



And the interiors:



These ones are screenshots I made from the google streetview inside view:

















You can see the interiors of the San Giorgio church with the virtual visit of Google Streetview at this link.
The interior of the church of San Giorgio (scanned image):



And these are my pictures of the exteriors (the door was closed, unluckily):









The bell tower and the side of the Palazzo Visconti:





Detail of the beautiful loggia (facing the Naviglio di Bereguardo) of the Palazzo Visconti (XVI century):

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Old October 1st, 2015, 10:27 PM   #1134
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Some not so well known revivalist church in Milan, let's start with the neogotic Santa Maria del Buon Consiglio alla Bovisa, the facade and the exteriors are quite dull:



And this is the apse, only the dimensions seems noteworthy from the outside:



But the interesting part is the neogotic interiors, very elaborated:











Notice the twirling columns:





















The counterfacade as seen from the altar:



All pictures (except the first two) are mine.
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Old October 1st, 2015, 10:53 PM   #1135
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Another revivalist church is San Pio V church in the Calvairate district, just a few kilometers south east of the Duomo:



This was the original project, as you can see is quite unfinished



And these are the interiors, in a delicious revivalist lombard bricks neoromanesque style, I have to admit that this church is one of my faves since is one of the "warmest" modern churches in the City:













The dome, which should have been sooo much taller in the original project:















This last one is quite blurry, sorry for that...



All the pictures are mine, except the first two.
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Old October 1st, 2015, 11:07 PM   #1136
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Santa Maria alla Porta church, early baroque architecture by the master of lombard baroque architecture, Francesco Maria Richino:







The beautiful and classy interiors:



The side chapels are decorated with the best of baroque sculptures of the time, in a Bernini fashon:







Detail of the beautiful baroque sculptures:





There are no transepts, just the balconies for the organs:



The little dome:







Detail of the dome:









All the pictures are mine.
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Old October 1st, 2015, 11:33 PM   #1137
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This one I'm bound to show you now is technically not even a church, it's a crypt, it's a tomb, but in many senses it's a sanctuary: it's Giuseppe Verdi's tomb, where is buried one of the biggest italian genius ever, and for me one of the very best composer ever.
This is the retirement house for musicians that Verdi donated to the city of Milan.
At the center of the court, there is this neogotic building. The lower part is the crypt where Verdi is buried...the upper part..well, we'll see it!









The amazing interiors are covered with Liberty/Art nouveau mosaics from the early XX century:





The ceilings:





The tomb of Giuseppe Verdi:











...and now, take the stairs and let's see what there is above of the crypt where lies Giuseppe Verdi, in the upper part of the neogotic building:



It's a chapel! Usually it's not opened to the public, but I was allowed to visit it because other people was visiting the Casa di Riposo Giuseppe Verdi and so they let me visit it with them. What a luck!

The liberty/Art nouveau stained glass windows are of exquisit artistical quality:







The counterfacade of the tiny chapel has a balcony too:



Details of the very elegant Liberty/Art nouveau decoration of the interiors of the little chapel:







All the pictures are mine.

To complete the post, here is the neogotic exterior of the Retirement House for musician "Giuseppe Verdi", designed by the architect Camillo Boito. The building was completed in 1899, but wasn't opened until 1902, the year after the Maestro Giuseppe Verdi's death, as by his will:



Picture found in Wikimedia commons, author Paolobon140
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Old October 2nd, 2015, 04:18 AM   #1138
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San Bernardino alle Monache's church, dating back to the first half of the XV century:





Details of the frescoes:



The beautiful frescoed apse:



The counter facade:



More details:







The amazing frescoes of the apse:



The facade:



And the little bell tower:



All the pictures are to be credited to www.milanofotografo.it
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Old October 2nd, 2015, 10:30 PM   #1139
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Another neoromanesque (it's the last one, I promise!) church, this last one is Sacra Famiglia church in Rogoredo district, sout-eastern outskirt of Milan municipality (yet very close to the city centre of course!).
This revivalist architecture temple was started in 1905 and finished in 1911, while the bell tower was finished in 1922.





The interior is actually nice in its neoromanesque style:

















The transept:





As you can see, the facade of the Sacra Famiglia in Rogoredo church is very similar to another neoromanesque church, this time in central Milan, the San Pietro in Sala church, that is because the two churches comes from the same architect, Oreste Benedetti, and the same engineer, Stefano Casati.

This is the facade of San Pietro in Sala:



And this is the facade of Sacra Famiglia in Rogoredo church, which is a little bit smaller than San Pietro in Sala anyway:



All pictures except the last three (taken from Wikimedia Commons and chiesadimilano.it respectively) are mine.
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Old October 2nd, 2015, 11:50 PM   #1140
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We have seen in a previous post San Fedele church:

Quote:
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Now let's see the most beautiful Monumental Sacristy of this church, rich of wooden carvings from 1500s in precious wood:

The entrance:





The stuccoes on the vault:







Details of the mannerist carvings on ebony:







After the Sacristy, you find the "Cappella delle Ballerine", where the dancers of the very close Opera theater of Milano La Scala used to came before the shows to pray for a successful exhibition:



As you can see, there are dancer shoes on the wall.

Behind that, the XIII century Madonna del Latte or Madonna dei Torriani chapel (in high middle ages, the Torriani were the Lords of Milan):











The carved wooden choir, the central panels of the seats represent perspectives and architectures:



The nave as seen from the choir:



The tall dome:



The apse and the main altar:



Another seen of the dome from right under:



The beautiful crypt:







With beautiful baroque terracotta statues decorating it:



The beautiful and elegant altar of the crypt:



All pictures are mine.
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